Eisenhower: Becoming the Leader of the Free World [EPUB]

Eisenhower: Becoming the Leader of the Free World [EPUB]
Eisenhower: Becoming the Leader of the Free World by Louis Galambos
2018 | EPUB | 14.83MB

In this engaging, fast-paced biography, Louis Galambos follows the career of Dwight D. "Ike" Eisenhower, offering new insight into this singular man who guided America toward consensus at home and a peaceful victory in the Cold War.

The long-time editor of the Eisenhower papers, Galambos may know more about this president than anyone alive. In this compelling book, he explores the shifts in Eisenhower’s identity and reputation over his lifetime and explains how he developed his distinctive leadership skills. As a career military officer, Eisenhower’s progress was uneven. Galambos shows how Ike, with the help of Brigadier General Fox Conner, his mentor and patron, learned how to profit from his mistakes, pivot quickly, and grow as a military and civilian leader. On D-Day, Eisenhower guided the largest amphibian force in history to a successful invasion of France and a decisive victory. After the defeat of Nazi Germany, he turned to politics and was elected president in 1952.

While today’s fiercely partisan political climate makes it difficult to imagine a president forging consensus in Washington, that’s exactly what Eisenhower did. As America’s leader in an era of profound postwar changes at home and abroad, President Eisenhower sought a middle way with compromise and coalition building. He provided his country with firm-handed leadership, bringing prosperity and peace to the American people in the dangerous years of the Cold War―an accomplishment that made him one of the most influential men of the twentieth century.

Destined to be the best short biography of the 34th president of the United States, Eisenhower conclusively demonstrates how and why this master of the middle way became the successful leader of the free world.

Theodore Roosevelt for Nature Lovers: Adventures with America's Great Outdoorsman [EPUB]

Theodore Roosevelt for Nature Lovers: Adventures with America's Great Outdoorsman [EPUB]
Theodore Roosevelt for Nature Lovers: Adventures with America's Great Outdoorsman edited by Mark Dawidziak
2017 | EPUB | 12.17MB

For history and nature fans

  • Theodore Roosevelt is one of the most beloved U.S. presidents of all time.
  • Handsomely designed with more than 40 illustrations and photographs.
  • A nice gift for history buffs and naturalists.

In addition to being a politician, frontiersman, and rancher, Roosevelt was an enthusiastic hunter who fought passionately for conservation. He played a significant role in setting aside land for the national parks. He participated in expeditions to benefit the New York Museum of Natural History and the Smithsonian, and while in the White House, his children enjoyed the company of a menagerie of ponies, cats, dogs, lizards, rabbits, a macaw, snakes, and guinea pigs. Theodore Roosevelt for Nature Lovers is a collection of delightful anecdotes—including the famous story about the “Teddy” bear—that reveal the Bull Moose’s ongoing fascination with the natural world.

Young Hitler: The Making of the Fuhrer [EPUB]

Young Hitler: The Making of the Fuhrer [EPUB]
Young Hitler: The Making of the Fuhrer by Paul Ham
2017 | EPUB | 2.31MB

By looking deeply into the Führer's childhood, war experiences, and early political career, this rigorous narrative seeks to answer this question: How did the early, defining years of Hitler’s life affect his rise to power?

When Adolf Hitler went to war in 1914, he was just 25 years old. It was a time he would later call the “most stupendous experience of my life.”

That war ended with Hitler in a hospital bed, temporarily blinded by mustard gas. The world he eventually opened his newly healed eyes to was new and it was terrible: Germany had been defeated, the Kaiser had fled, and the army had been resolutely humbled.

Hitler never accepted these facts. Out of his fury rose a white-hot hatred, an unquenchable thirst for revenge against the “criminals” who had signed the armistice, the socialists he accused of stabbing the army in the back, and, most violently, the Jews―a direct threat to the master race of his imagination―on whose shoulders he would pile all of Germany’s woes.

By peeling back the layers of Hitler’s childhood, his war record, and his early political career, Paul Ham’s Young Hitler: The Making of the Führer seeks the man behind the myth. More broadly, Paul Ham seeks to answer the question: Was Hitler’s rise to power an extreme example of a recurring type of demagogue―a politician who will do and say anything to seize power; who thrives on chaos; and who personifies, in his words and in his actions, the darkest prejudices of humankind?

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