How to Live a Good Life: A Guide to Choosing Your Personal Philosophy [EPUB]

How to Live a Good Life: A Guide to Choosing Your Personal Philosophy [EPUB]
How to Live a Good Life: A Guide to Choosing Your Personal Philosophy edited by Massimo Pigliucci, Skye Cleary, Daniel Kaufman
2020 | EPUB | ISBN: 9780525566144 | 6.42MB

A collection of essays by fifteen philosophers presenting a thoughtful, introductory guide to choosing a philosophy for living an examined and meaningful life.

Socrates famously said "the unexamined life is not worth living," but what does it mean to truly live philosophically?

This thought-provoking, wide-ranging collection brings together essays by fifteen leading philosophers reflecting on what it means to live according to a philosophy of life. From Eastern philosophies (Daoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism) and classical Western philosophies (such as Aristotelianism and Stoicism), to the four major religions, as well as contemporary philosophies (such as existentialism and effective altruism), each contributor offers a lively, personal account of how they find meaning in the practice of their chosen philosophical tradition.

Together, the pieces in How to Live a Good Life provide not only a beginner's guide to choosing a life philosophy but also a timely portrait of what it means to live an examined life in the twenty-first century.

The Occult I Ching: The Secret Language of Serpents [EPUB]

The Occult I Ching: The Secret Language of Serpents [EPUB]
The Occult I Ching: The Secret Language of Serpents by Maja D’Aoust
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781620559048 | 18.8MB

An illustrated guide to the occult history, serpent magic, and practical application of the I Ching

  • Reveals how the sacred language of the original eight trigrams of the I Ching was discovered by a wisdom serpent known as Fu Xi
  • Explores how the I Ching formed the basis of the earliest Taoist philosophies, its complex correlation with human DNA, and its relationship with artificial intelligence
  • Provides new contemporary analysis of each of the 64 hexagrams, their changing lines, and archetypes of the I Ching
  • Includes original artwork highlighting the serpent magic within the system and tools to help you interpret the I Ching based on your own individual experience

One of the oldest books in the world, the I Ching has been used in China for millennia to open a dialogue with divinity, gain insight and wisdom, and pull aside the curtain of reality to reveal the light of the heavens. Yet, despite its popularity over thousands of years, few understand its mysterious origins, symbolism, or occult connections.

In this illustrated guide, Maja D’Aoust applies her significant experience as a professional practitioner and scholar of the I Ching to provide a history of the oracle, explain the mechanisms at work behind it, and offer a new experiential approach to its interpretation. The author begins by examining the discovery of the I Ching by the first mythical emperor of China, Fu Xi, a divine being with the body of a serpent. She reveals how Fu Xi’s eight original trigrams, also called the Ba Gua, provided a sacred language of symbols that allowed for communication between the diviner and the spirit world. Using the I Ching’s principles of cosmology as a basis, the shamans of ancient China developed the earliest Taoist philosophies of nature, medicine, martial arts, and mathematics as well as ecstatic practices, war strategies, birth and death rituals, agricultural systems, and alchemical studies. D’Aoust further shows how the I Ching relates to the mathematical sequences of biology and human DNA, examining the correlation between the serpent’s tail and the double helix. She reveals how the ways the oracle connects with your own inner knowing parallel the ways in which DNA repairs itself.

Providing a new analysis of each of the 64 hexagrams and their changing lines and archetypes, the author explores each hexagram’s meanings in depth, alongside original artwork highlighting the serpent magic within the system and tools to help you interpret the I Ching based on your own individual experience. Revealing how the oracle holds complex networks of meaning that language alone fails to capture, D’Aoust offers a new understanding of the Book of Changes and its many hidden lessons.

Historical Dictionary of Daoism [EPUB]

Historical Dictionary of Daoism [EPUB]
Historical Dictionary of Daoism (Historical Dictionaries of Religions, Philosophies, and Movements Series) by Ronnie L. Littlejohn
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781538122730 | 1.42MB

Daoism is the oldest indigenous philosophic-spiritual tradition of China and one of the most ancient of the world’s spiritual structures. The name Daoism comes from the term dao, which means a “way” or a “road” through the field or woods to one’s village. It is also means the “way” to do something, such as how a master craftsman carves wood, makes a bell, or even butchers an ox. But dao is also a nominative in the history of Daoism, referring to the energizing process that permeates and animates all of reality and moves it along. However, both text and practice in this tradition insist that dao itself cannot be described in words; it is not God in the sense of Western philosophy or religion. Daoism has no supreme being, even if there is an extensive grammar about nominally self-conscious entities and powers for which the Chinese use the word “spirit” (shen). For example, the highest powers of Daoism are variously called Taishang Laojun (the deified Laozi), the Celestial Worthy of Primordial Beginning (Yuanshi tianzun), the Jade Emperor (Yuhuang Shangdi), or the Perfected Warrior (Zhenwu). But these are expressions of dao in specific shen; they are not identical to Dao, except in the most unique case—when Laozi, the putative founder of Daoism and author of its major work, Daodejing, is said to be one with the dao.

Historical Dictionary of Daoism contains a chronology, an introduction, appendixes, an extensive bibliography, and more than 400 cross-referenced entries related to the Chinese belief and worldview known as Daoism, including dozens of Daoist terms, names, and practices. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Daoism.

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