The Accursed Tower: The Fall of Acre and the End of the Crusades [Audiobook]

The Accursed Tower: The Fall of Acre and the End of the Crusades [Audiobook]
The Accursed Tower: The Fall of Acre and the End of the Crusades [Audiobook] by Roger Crowley, read by Matt Kugler
2019 | MP3@128 kbps + EPUB | 8h 5m | 444.41MB

From a New York Times best-selling author, a stirring account of the siege of Acre in 1291, when the last Christian stronghold fell to the Muslim army

The 1291 siege of Acre was the Alamo of the Christian Crusades -- the final bloody battle for the Holy Land. After a desperate six weeks, the beleaguered citadel surrendered to the Mamluks, bringing an end to Christendom's 200 year adventure in the Middle East.

In The Accursed Tower, Roger Crowley delivers a lively narrative of the lead-up to the siege and a vivid, blow-by-blow account of the climactic battle. Drawing on extant Arabic sources as well as untranslated Latin documents, he argues that Acre is notable for technical advances in military planning and siege warfare, and extraordinary for its individual heroism and savage slaughter. A gripping depiction of the crusader era told through its dramatic last moments, The Accursed Tower offers an essential new view on a crucial turning point in world history.

The Surprising Superpower: America’s Place on the World Stage and How It Got There [Audiobook]

The Surprising Superpower: America’s Place on the World Stage and How It Got There [Audiobook]
The Surprising Superpower: America’s Place on the World Stage and How It Got There [Audiobook] by Professor Robert K. Brigham
2019 | M4B@128 kbps | 9h 34m | 522.27MB

The great American experiment is one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. How did America transform from a scrappy collection of British colonies into a global superpower?

In 24 riveting lectures, acclaimed history professor and American foreign policy expert Robert K. Brigham, PhD leads you on a trek across the globe to explore the dramatic events that shaped America and the world.

Through vivid accounts and insightful analysis, Prof. Brigham shows you that America's ascent into world leadership was neither preordained nor accidental. Rather, from its very beginnings, American foreign policy has been central to the country's national identity. While the Founding Fathers used foreign relations to secure the young republic's political experiment, subsequent leaders have consistently wielded American power to ensure the country's prosperity and security.

As Prof. Brigham ably demonstrates, America's role on the world stage has rarely been uncomplicated. Americans have always debated their place in foreign affairs - their wars, their commitments, their interests - and challenged others' perception of the nation's power. In fact, few issues have divided policy makers and the American public more than US foreign policy.

The Compatriots: The Brutal and Chaotic History of Russia's Exiles, Émigrés, and Agents Abroad [Audiobook]

The Compatriots: The Brutal and Chaotic History of Russia's Exiles, Émigrés, and Agents Abroad [Audiobook]
The Compatriots: The Brutal and Chaotic History of Russia's Exiles, Émigrés, and Agents Abroad [Audiobook] by Andrei Soldatov, Irina Borogan, read by Nick Sullivan
2019 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 10h 25m | 286.26MB

The authors of The Red Web examine the shifting role of Russian expatriates throughout history, and their complicated, unbreakable relationship with the mother country - be it antagonistic or far too chummy.

The history of Russian espionage is soaked in blood, from a spontaneous pistol shot that killed a secret policeman in Romania in 1924 to the attempt to poison an exiled KGB colonel in Salisbury, England, in 2017. Russian émigrés have found themselves continually at the center of the mayhem.

Russians began leaving the country in big numbers in the late 19th century, fleeing pogroms, tsarist secret police persecution, and the Revolution, then Stalin and the KGB - and creating the third-largest diaspora in the world. The exodus created a rare opportunity for the Kremlin. Moscow's masters and spymasters fostered networks of spies, many of whom were emigrants driven from Russia. By the 1930s and 1940s, dozens of spies were in New York City gathering information for Moscow.

But the story did not end with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Some émigrés have turned into assets of the resurgent Russian nationalist state, while others have taken up the dissident challenge once more - at their personal peril. From Trotsky to Litvinenko, The Compatriots is the gripping history of Russian score-settling around the world.

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