The Thirty-Year Genocide: Turkey's Destruction of Its Christian Minorities, 1894-1924 [Audiobook]

The Thirty-Year Genocide: Turkey's Destruction of Its Christian Minorities, 1894-1924 [Audiobook]
The Thirty-Year Genocide: Turkey's Destruction of Its Christian Minorities, 1894-1924 [Audiobook] by Benny Morris, Dror Ze'evi, Claire Bloom, read by Stefan Rudnicki
2019 | M4B@64 kbps | 21h 56m | 597.83MB

A reappraisal of the giant massacres perpetrated by the Ottoman Empire and then the Turkish Republic against their Christian minorities from 1894 to 1924

Between 1894 and 1924, three waves of violence swept across Anatolia, targeting the region's Christian minorities, who had previously accounted for 20 percent of the population. By 1924 the Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks had been reduced to two percent. Most historians have treated these waves as distinct, isolated events, and successive Turkish governments presented them as an unfortunate sequence of accidents. The Thirty-Year Genocide is the first account to show that the three were actually part of a single, continuing, and intentional effort to wipe out Anatolia's Christian population.

The years in question, the most violent in the recent history of the region, began during the reign of the Ottoman sultan Abdulhamid II, continued under the Young Turks, and ended during the first years of the Turkish Republic founded by Ataturk. Yet despite the dramatic swing from the Islamizing autocracy of the sultan to the secularizing republicanism of the post-World War I period, the nation's annihilationist policies were remarkably constant, with continual recourse to premeditated mass killing, homicidal deportation, forced conversion, mass rape, and brutal abduction. And one thing more was a constant: the rallying cry of jihad. While not justified under the teachings of Islam, the killing of two million Christians was effected through the calculated exhortation of the Turks to create a pure Muslim nation.

Revelatory and impeccably researched, Benny Morris and Dror Ze'evi's account is certain to transform how we see one of modern history's most horrific events.

The Lost Art of Handwriting: Rediscover the Beauty and Power of Penmanship [EPUB]

The Lost Art of Handwriting: Rediscover the Beauty and Power of Penmanship [EPUB]
The Lost Art of Handwriting: Rediscover the Beauty and Power of Penmanship by Brenna Jordan
2019 | EPUB | 70.73MB

Revisit the lost art of writing with these fun prompts, worksheets, exercises—and more!—and experience the many benefits of writing by hand, including increased focus and memory, relaxation, and creative expression.

Writing by hand may seem passé in the digital age, but it shouldn’t be dismissed as simply an activity for grade schoolers—it offers countless benefits that have been studied by researchers, brain neurologists, therapists, educators, and others who are invested in helping handwriting thrive in an age of advancing technology. Handwriting may be slower than typing—but this gives your brain more time to process information, and stimulates neurological connections that aid in memory, focus, and composition. The process of handwriting can also have a soothing, calming effect and can even serve as a great form of meditation. And of course, it’s a great way of expressing your individuality and personal style.

The Lost Art of Handwriting explores the history of writing longhand, and reintroduces proper stroke sequences, letter forms, and techniques for evaluating and improving your handwriting. You will discover how the amazing variety of letter forms provide endless opportunities for making these alphabets your own, and how to choose alternatives that fit your preferences while keeping your writing neat, consistent, and unique to you. You’ll learn how to connect letters in cursive writing to help you write more smoothly, and with practice, more efficiently. Learn how easy it is to apply what you’ve learned into your everyday life with tips for integrating handwriting practice into already jam-packed schedules.

Soon, you’ll notice a steady increase in the relaxation, value, and joy that handwriting offers to everyone who persists in putting the pen or pencil to paper.

Defying Hitler: The Germans Who Resisted Nazi Rule [Audiobook]

Defying Hitler: The Germans Who Resisted Nazi Rule [Audiobook]
Defying Hitler: The Germans Who Resisted Nazi Rule [Audiobook] by Gordon Thomas, Greg Lewis, read by Mark Bramhall
2019 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 22h 1m | 605.1/23.21MB

An enthralling story that vividly resurrects the web of everyday Germans who resisted Nazi rule.

Nazi Germany is remembered as a nation of willing fanatics. But beneath the surface, countless ordinary, everyday Germans actively resisted Hitler. Some passed industrial secrets to Allied spies. Some forged passports to help Jews escape the Reich. For others, resistance was as simple as writing a letter denouncing the rigidity of Nazi law. No matter how small the act, the danger was the same - any display of defiance was met with arrest, interrogation, torture, and even death.

Defying Hitler follows the underground network of Germans who believed standing against the Fuhrer to be more important than their own survival. Their bravery is astonishing - a schoolgirl beheaded by the Gestapo for distributing anti-Nazi fliers; a German American teacher who smuggled military intel to Soviet agents, becoming the only American woman executed by the Nazis; a pacifist philosopher murdered for his role in a plot against Hitler; a young idealist who joined the SS to document their crimes, only to end up, to his horror, an accomplice to the Holocaust. This remarkable account illuminates their struggles, yielding an accessible narrative history with the pace and excitement of a thriller.

The New Evil: Understanding the Emergence of Modern Violent Crime [Audiobook]

The New Evil: Understanding the Emergence of Modern Violent Crime [Audiobook]
The New Evil: Understanding the Emergence of Modern Violent Crime [Audiobook] by Michael H. Stone MD, Gary Brucato PhD, read by Charles Constant
2019 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 18h 25m | 502.09/3.33MB

A chilling follow-up to the popular true-crime book The Anatomy of Evil.

Revisiting Dr. Michael Stone's groundbreaking 22-level Gradations of Evil Scale, a hierarchy of evil behavior first introduced in the book The Anatomy of Evil, Stone and Dr. Gary Brucato, a fellow violence and serious psychopathology expert, here provide even more detail, using dozens of cases to exemplify the categories along the continuum. The New Evil also presents compelling evidence that, since a cultural tipping-point in the 1960s, certain types of violent crime have emerged that in earlier decades never or very rarely occurred.

The authors examine the biological and psychiatric factors behind serial killing, serial rape, torture, mass and spree murders, and other severe forms of violence. They persuasively argue that, in at least some cases, a collapse of moral faculties contributes to the commission of such heinous crimes, such that "evil" should be considered not only a valid area of inquiry, but, in our current cultural climate, an imperative one. They consider the effects of new technologies and sociological, cultural, and historical factors since the 1960s that may have set the stage for "the new evil."

Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World [Audiobook]

Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World [Audiobook]
Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World [Audiobook] by Clive Thompson, read by René Ruiz
2019 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 13h 22m | 364.31/1.14MB

Hello, world.

Facebook's algorithms shaping the news. Self-driving cars roaming the streets. Revolution on Twitter and romance on Tinder. We live in a world constructed of code - and coders are the ones who built it for us. From acclaimed tech writer Clive Thompson comes a brilliant anthropological reckoning with the most powerful tribe in the world today, computer programmers, in a book that interrogates who they are, how they think, what qualifies as greatness in their world, and what should give us pause. They are the most quietly influential people on the planet, and Coders shines a light on their culture.

In pop culture and media, the people who create the code that rules our world are regularly portrayed in hackneyed, simplified terms, as ciphers in hoodies. Thompson goes far deeper, dramatizing the psychology of the invisible architects of the culture, exploring their passions and their values, as well as their messy history. In nuanced portraits, Coders takes us close to some of the great programmers of our time, including the creators of Facebook's News Feed, Instagram, Google's cutting-edge AI, and more. Speaking to everyone from revered "10X" elites to neophytes, back-end engineers, and front-end designers, Thompson explores the distinctive psychology of this vocation - which combines a love of logic, an obsession with efficiency, the joy of puzzle-solving, and a superhuman tolerance for mind-bending frustration.

Along the way, Coders thoughtfully ponders the morality and politics of code, including its implications for civic life and the economy. Programmers shape our everyday behavior: When they make something easy to do, we do more of it. When they make it hard or impossible, we do less of it. Thompson wrestles with the major controversies of our era, from the "disruption" fetish of Silicon Valley to the struggle for inclusion by marginalized groups.

In his accessible, erudite style, Thompson unpacks the surprising history of the field, beginning with the first coders - brilliant and pioneering women, who, despite crafting some of the earliest personal computers and programming languages, were later written out of history. Coders introduces modern crypto-hackers fighting for your privacy, AI engineers building eerie new forms of machine cognition, teenage girls losing sleep at 24/7 hackathons, and unemployed Kentucky coal-miners learning a new career.

At the same time, the book deftly illustrates how programming has become a marvelous new art form - a source of delight and creativity, not merely danger. To get as close to his subject as possible, Thompson picks up the thread of his own long-abandoned coding skills as he reckons with what superb programming looks like.

To understand the world today, we need to understand code and its consequences. With Coders, Thompson gives a definitive look into the heart of the machine.

The Accidental Homo Sapiens: Genetics, Behavior, and Free Will [Audiobook]

The Accidental Homo Sapiens: Genetics, Behavior, and Free Will [Audiobook]
The Accidental Homo Sapiens: Genetics, Behavior, and Free Will [Audiobook] by Ian Tattersall, Rob DeSalle, read by Jonathan Todd Ross
2019 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 7h 42m | 210.27/6.88MB

What happens now that human population has outpaced biological natural selection? Two leading scientists reveal how we became who we are - and what we might become.

When you think of evolution, the picture that most likely comes to mind is a straight-forward progression, the iconic illustration of a primate morphing into a proud, upright human being. But in reality, random events have played huge roles in determining the evolutionary histories of everything from lions to lobsters to humans. However, random genetic novelties are most likely to become fixed in small populations. It is mathematically unlikely that this will happen in large ones.

With our enormous, close-packed, and seemingly inexorably expanding population, humanity has fallen under the influence of the famous (or infamous) "bell curve." Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle's revelatory new book explores what the future of our species could hold, while simultaneously revealing what we didn't become - and what we won't become.

A cognitively unique species, and our actions fall on a bell curve as well. Individual people may be saintly or evil; generous or grasping; narrow-minded or visionary. But any attempt to characterize our species must embrace all of its members and so all of these antitheses. It is possible not just for the species, but for a single individual to be all of these things - even in the same day. We all fall somewhere within the giant hyperspace of the human condition that these curves describe.

The Accidental Homo Sapiens shows listeners that though humanity now exists on this bell curve, we are far from a stagnant species. Tattersall and DeSalle reveal how biological evolution in modern humans has given way to a cultural dynamic that is unlike anything else the Earth has ever witnessed, and that will keep life interesting - perhaps sometimes too interesting - for as long as we exist on this planet.

This Searing Light, the Sun and Everything Else: Joy Division: The Oral History [EPUB]

This Searing Light, the Sun and Everything Else: Joy Division: The Oral History [EPUB]
This Searing Light, the Sun and Everything Else: Joy Division: The Oral History by Jon Savage
2019 | EPUB | 4.34MB

Joy Division emerged in the mid-70s at the start of a two-decades long Manchester scene that was to become much mythologised. It was then a city still labouring in the wake of the war and entering a phase of huge social and physical change, and something of this spirit made its way into the DNA of the band. Over the course of two albums, a handful of other seminal releases, and some legendary gigs, Joy Division became the most successful and exciting underground band of their generation. Then, on the brink of a tour to America, Ian Curtis took his own life.

In This searing light, the sun and everything else, Jon Savage has assembled three decades worth of interviews with the principle players in the Joy Division story: Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook, Stephen Morris, Deborah Curtis, Peter Saville, Tony Wilson, Paul Morley, Alan Hempsall, Lesley Gilbert, Terry Mason, Anik Honoré, and many more. It is the story of how a band resurrected a city, how they came together in circumstances that are both accidental and extraordinary, and how their music galvanised a generation of fans, artists and musicians. It is a classic story of how young men armed with electric guitars and good taste in literature can change the world with four chords and three-and-a-half minutes of music. And it is the story of how illness and demons can rob the world of a shamanic lead singer and visionary lyricist.

This searing light, the sun and everything else presents the history of Joy Division in an intimate and candid way, as orchestrated by the lodestar of British music writing, Jon Savage.

The Book of the Moon: A Guide to Our Closest Neighbor [EPUB]

The Book of the Moon: A Guide to Our Closest Neighbor [EPUB]
The Book of the Moon: A Guide to Our Closest Neighbor by Maggie Aderin-Pocock
2019 | EPUB | 7.73MB

Have you ever wondered if there are seasons on the moon or if space tourism will ever become commonplace? So has Dr. Maggie Aderin-Pocock. In fact, she earned her nickname “Lunatic” because of her deep fascination for all things lunar. In her lucidly written, comprehensive guide to the moon, Aderin-Pocock takes readers on a journey to our closest celestial neighbor, exploring folklore, facts, and future plans.

She begins with the basics, unpacking everything from the moon’s topography and composition to its formation and orbit around the Earth. She travels back in time to track humanity’s relationship with the moon — beliefs held by ancient civilizations, the technology that allowed for the first moon landing, a brief history of moongazing, and how the moon has influenced culture throughout the years — and then to the future, analyzing the pros and cons of continued space travel and exploration. Throughout the book are sidebars, graphs, and charts to enhance the facts as well as black-and-white illustrations of the moon and stars. The Book of the Moon will be published for the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

On the Trail of Stardust: The Guide to Finding Micrometeorites [EPUB]

On the Trail of Stardust: The Guide to Finding Micrometeorites [EPUB]
On the Trail of Stardust: The Guide to Finding Micrometeorites: Tools, Techniques, and Identification by Jon Larsen
2019 | EPUB | 25.85MB

On the Trail of Stardust puts the heavens in your hands—in the form of cosmic dust, or micrometeorites. With this handy guide from the author of the international bestseller In Search of Stardust, Jon Larsen, you will learn how to find micrometeorites in your own neighborhood!

Stardust—also known as micrometeorites—is the oldest matter anywhere. Nothing has traveled farther to reach Earth. For a century, scientists have searched everywhere for stardust, but only found it in remote areas like Antarctica and, more recently, outer space. Author and citizen scientist extraordinaire Jon Larsen was the first to find them in populated areas. With this book, you too can discover stardust as near as your own rooftop!

Following his successful debut, In Search of Stardust, Larsen turns his attention from explaining the formation and various kinds of stardust to revealing his methods and techniques for finding micrometeorites in a compact, durable guide. Larsen covers everything from the origins and formation of micrometeorites to assembling the simple array of gear needed to get out there and find stardust in your own neighborhood, rooftop, or rain gutters.

Larsen explains the best places to look and offers step-by-step photo sequences of the techniques he has developed to assemble his collection of 1,500-plus verified micrometeorites (and counting). And you don’t need a multi-million-dollar scanning electron microscope to document your collection; Jon shows how to assemble a serviceable photo setup from easily accessible equipment.

The book is capped off with a field guide of sorts that offers a taxonomy of the various types of micrometeorites, along with sample images, as well as the kinds of man-made and terrestrial spherules that stardust hunters are likely to encounter and how to identify them as imposters.

Once thought to exist only at the bottoms of oceans and atop polar ice, it turns out that stardust is everywhere…and On the Trail of Stardust is your indispensable tool to finding it for yourself.

The Greeks: Lost Civilizations [EPUB]

The Greeks: Lost Civilizations [EPUB]
The Greeks: Lost Civilizations by Philip Matyszak
2018 | EPUB | 17.55MB

This is ancient Greece – but not as we know it. Few people today appreciate that Greek civilization was spread across the Middle East, and that there were Greek cities in the foothills of the Himalayas. This book tells the story of the Greeks outside Greece, such as Sappho, the poet from Lesbos; Archimedes, a native of Syracuse; and Herodotus, who was born in Asia Minor as a subject of the Persian Empire.

From the earliest times of prehistoric Greek colonies around the Black Sea, through settlements in Spain and Italy, to the conquests of Alexander and the glories of the Hellenistic era, Philip Matyszak illuminates the Greek soldiers, statesmen, scientists and philosophers who, though they seldom – if ever – set foot on the Greek mainland, nevertheless laid the foundations of what we call 'Greek culture' today. Instead of following the well-worn path of describing Athenian democracy and Spartan militarism, this book offers a fresh look at what it meant to be Greek by telling the story of the Greeks abroad, from India to Spain.

Philosophy for Busy People [EPUB]

Philosophy for Busy People [EPUB]
Philosophy for Busy People by Alain Stephen
2019 | EPUB | 1.64MB

Do you know your Aristotelianism or Asceticism from your Egalitarianism? No? Well this book will give you all the information you need to tell one from the other and impress your friends with the seeming depth of your knowledge.

From happiness to politics and power, science, religion and love - this compact and accessible primer captures the diverse moral and ethical arguments - and major theories - of Western Philosophy. In his warm and concise narrative, the author brings the great ancient and modern 'thinkers' and their unique perspectives vividly to the page. This is a thought-provoking whistle-stop tour of established philosophical thinking and its continued relevance in our lives today.

Jam packed with all the important ideas but at the same time highly accessible and informative, Philosophy for Busy People is perfect for those who enjoy thinking about the big questions in life.

24 Hours in Ancient Athens: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There [EPUB]

24 Hours in Ancient Athens: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There [EPUB]
24 Hours in Ancient Athens: A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There by Philip Matyszak
2019 | EPUB | 3.17MB

Spend 24 hours with the ancient Athenians. See the city through their eyes as it teeters on the edge of the fateful war that would end its golden age.

Athens, 416 BC. A tenuous peace holds. The city-state's political and military might are feared throughout the ancient world; it pushes the boundaries of social, literary and philosophical experimentation in an era when it has a greater concentration of geniuses per capita than at any other time in human history. Yet even geniuses go to the bathroom, argue with their spouse and enjoy a drink with friends.

Few of the city's other inhabitants enjoy the benefits of such a civilized society, though - as multicultural and progressive as Athens can be, many are barred from citizenship. No, for the average person, life is about making ends meet, whether that be selling fish, guarding the temple or smuggling lucrative Greek figs.

During the course of a day we meet 24 Athenians from all strata of society - from the slave-girl to the councilman, the vase painter to the naval commander, the housewife to the hoplite - and get to know what the real Athens was like by spending an hour in their company. We encounter a different one of these characters every chapter, with each chapter forming an hour in the life of the ancient city. We also get to spy on the daily doings of notable Athenians through the eyes of regular people as the city hovers on the brink of the fateful war that will destroy its golden age.

The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome [TTC Video]

The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome [TTC Video]
The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome [TTC Video] by Professor Gregory S Aldrete, PhD
Course No 3344 | MP4, AVC, 960x540 | AAC, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 8.18GB

In 31 BCE, on an otherwise unremarkable afternoon in the Mediterranean, the Roman general Octavian surveyed the aftermath of the ferocious Battle of Actium, where he’d defeated his rival Mark Antony in a war for control of Rome. This moment, in which a military leader rests and reflects on his next move toward becoming the sole leader of the Western world, is the germ out of which grows one of the most breathtaking stories in world history. This leader would soon ingeniously maneuver his way to become Rome’s first emperor, setting the stage for five centuries of Roman expansion; warfare; and, ultimately, collapse.

When Octavian, who took the title of Augustus as the first emperor of Rome, defeated Mark Antony to become the sole ruler of the Roman world, it was a major turning point in Western civilization. Not only did his decades-long rule completely transform the old Roman Republic into the Roman Empire, but it also profoundly shaped the culture and history of our world today. The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome traces this breathtaking history from the empire’s foundation by Augustus to its Golden Age in the 2nd century CE through a series of ever-worsening crises until its ultimate disintegration.

Taught by acclaimed Professor Gregory S. Aldrete of the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay, these 24 captivating lectures offer you the chance to experience this story like never before, incorporating the latest historical research, perspectives, and insights that challenge our previous notions of Rome’s decline. Professor Aldrete examines the major events and familiar figures of the Roman Empire, including:

  • The political innovations of Augustus—and his one major shortcoming;
  • The mental instability and cruel acts of Caligula and Nero;
  • Writers such as Ovid, Horace, and Virgil;
  • The stoic philosophy of Marcus Aurelius;
  • Attila the Hun, Alaric, and other “barbarians” who threatened the empire; and
  • Christian philosophers such as Augustine and Jerome.

But this course also moves beyond the famous figures and delves deeply into the lives of ordinary Roman women and men. You’ll read the messages they left on tombstones or scribbled on walls as graffiti; examine what life was really like for average city-dwellers and the hazards they faced every day; spend a day in Rome’s spectacular public entertainments, such as gladiator games and chariot races; and explore some of the city’s marvelous architectural and engineering works, including the Pantheon and the aqueducts.

The more you learn about the ancient Romans, the more you will realize how much we still walk in their footsteps. From particulars of the English language to our system of government to our religious practices, we are still experiencing the echoes of the Roman Empire in our world today. Indeed, we cannot truly understand ourselves unless we comprehend the vital influences of Rome on the modern world—and the lessons the empire can still teach us. The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome is an informative—and highly entertaining—guide to one of the most important periods in world history.

Study the Roman Emperors—Stable and Strong, Strange and Insane

One major theme throughout the Roman Empire is the tenuous nature of power. Because Augustus selected heredity as his succession plan, each emperor had to reckon with choosing—or, in some cases, adopting—his heir. Frequently, emperors who inherited the title were incompetent at best, and some were downright depraved.

Because history is ultimately about people, Professor Aldrete introduces you to the characters behind the names, and brings their stories to life. You’ll find out who stabilized Rome, and how; who spent money on useless projects such as a 100-foot golden statue of himself in the nude; who the citizens loved and who the citizens feared. For instance:

  • Tiberius was dour and introverted, and was often tight-fisted, which didn’t endear him to the citizens, but he did secure the borders.
  • Caligula, meanwhile, took the throne riding a wave of popularity, but his reign soon degenerated into madness, bizarre actions, and terror.
  • Nero never fiddled while Rome burned, but he did murder senators, citizens, and even his own mother (a process that took numerous Monty Python-esque twists and turns).
  • Domitian had a habit of shutting himself in his room for hours at a time, catching and impaling flies.
  • Constantine founded a second capital city for the Empire at Byzantium and immodestly renamed it Constantinople after himself.

Discover Rome as Experienced by Everyday Citizens

While surveying the major figures gives you a broad look at the empire’s history, Professor Aldrete goes beyond the traditional “kings and battles” approach to show you what life was like for ordinary people—starting with the nature of the city itself.

Given the traditional historical emphasis on Rome as a civilized city of good governance, engineering marvels, and magnificent architecture, you might believe the city was a clean metropolis made up of beautiful marble and elegant baths. In reality, the city was dirty, dank, and disease-ridden. Professor Aldrete cites the five F’s: floods, fires, famine, filth, and fevers—not a place you’d want to visit.

Traditional history has relied on elite, upper-class, and primarily male sources to tell us about life in Rome, but recent historians have focused on additional sources to bring the story of everyday Romans to life. In this course, you’ll examine a variety of sources that were previously overlooked or unexamined, including letters; administrative documents; epitaphs on tombstones; and, perhaps most interestingly, graffiti.

The graffiti gives us exciting insight into the minds of people long gone—and long ignored in the history books. You’ll discover eerily modern-sounding commentary on the walls of Pompeii, preserved thanks to the infamous volcano: advertisements for rooms for rent, creative and amusing political campaign ads, complaints about service in the local tavern, vulgar commentary, and even simple announcements along the lines of “Septimius was here.”

Investigate Why and When Rome Finally Collapsed

Two of the most intriguing questions about the Roman Empire are why, and when, it collapsed. As you’ll discover, historians can make the case for numerous years, including:

  • 31 BCE: The Battle of Actium, which marked the end of the Old Republic
  • 180 CE: The death of Marcus Aurelius, the last in a string of “good” emperors during Rome’s Golden Age
  • 312: Constantine’s conversion to Christianity, the next major force to sweep across the West
  • 410: The Visigoth Alaric’s sack of Rome
  • 1453: The fall of Constantinople to the Turks
  • 1917: The Russian revolution and the final end of a system that had once considered itself the ideological heirs of Rome

Professor Aldrete does not give you an easy answer, but rather shows how history develops over time, driven by a multiplicity of factors. Forces ranging from barbarian invasions to economic collapse to climate change all played a role in the gradual end of the Roman Empire.

He also brings in a fascinating counter-perspective. The traditional story is one of collapse as Rome disintegrated and the gloomy “Dark Ages” emerged in the 4th and 5th centuries. Recently, historians have been re-examining the years from 200-600 and discovering a different story. They see in this era—“late antiquity”—invigorating change and a vibrant mingling of cultures.

Historians could debate the end of the empire all day, but Professor Aldrete simply presents the evidence and leaves it to you to formulate your own answers. One thing is certain: The Roman Empire may be ancient history, but it is far from over. The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome gives you an exciting, informative, often-amusing, and always entertaining look at an era and a people who continue to astound and interest us today.

The Roman Empire: From Augustus to the Fall of Rome [TTC Video]

The Heartland: An American History [Audiobook]

The Heartland: An American History [Audiobook]
The Heartland: An American History [Audiobook] by Kristin L Hoganson, read by Gabra Zackman
2019 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9h 51m | 271.29/58.07MB

A history of a quintessentially American place - the rural and small-town heartland - that uncovers deep yet hidden currents of connection with the world.

When Kristin L. Hoganson arrived in Champaign, Illinois, after teaching at Harvard, studying at Yale, and living in the DC metro area with various stints overseas, she expected to find her new home, well, isolated. Even provincial. After all, she had landed in the American heartland, a place where the nation's identity exists in its pristine form. Or so we have been taught to believe.

Struck by the gap between reputation and reality, she determined to get to the bottom of history and myth. The deeper she dug into the making of the modern heartland, the wider her story became as she realized that she'd uncovered an unheralded crossroads of people, commerce, and ideas. But the really interesting thing, Hoganson found, was that over the course of American history, even as the region's connections with the rest of the planet became increasingly dense and intricate, the idea of the rural Midwest as a steadfast heartland became a stronger and more stubbornly immovable myth. In enshrining a symbolic heart, the American people have repressed the kinds of stories that Hoganson tells, of sweeping breadth and depth and soul.

In The Heartland, Kristin L. Hoganson drills deep into the center of the country, only to find a global story in the resulting core sample. Deftly navigating the disconnect between history and myth, she tracks both the backstory of this region and the evolution of the idea of an unalloyed heart at the center of the land. A provocative and highly original work of historical scholarship, The Heartland speaks volumes about pressing preoccupations, among them identity and community, immigration and trade, and security and global power. And food. To read it is to be inoculated against using the word heartland unironically ever again.

America Before: The Key to Earth's Lost Civilization [Audiobook]

America Before: The Key to Earth's Lost Civilization [Audiobook]
America Before: The Key to Earth's Lost Civilization [Audiobook] by Graham Hancock, read by the Author
2019 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 17h 17m | 470.82/127.05MB

Was an advanced civilization lost to history in the global cataclysm that ended the last Ice Age? Graham Hancock, the internationally best-selling author, has made it his life's work to find out - and in America Before, he draws on the latest archaeological and DNA evidence to bring his quest to a stunning conclusion.

We've been taught that North and South America were empty of humans until around 13,000 years ago - among the last great landmasses on earth to have been settled by our ancestors. But new discoveries have radically reshaped this long-established picture, and we know now that the Americas were first peopled more than 130,000 years ago - many tens of thousands of years before human settlements became established elsewhere.

Hancock's research takes us on a series of journeys and encounters with the scientists responsible for the recent extraordinary breakthroughs. In the process, from the Mississippi Valley to the Amazon rain forest, he reveals that ancient "New World" cultures share a legacy of advanced scientific knowledge and sophisticated spiritual beliefs with supposedly unconnected "Old World" cultures. Have archaeologists focused for too long only on the "Old World" in their search for the origins of civilization while failing to consider the revolutionary possibility that those origins might in fact be found in the "New World"?

America Before: The Key to Earth's Lost Civilization is the culmination of everything that millions of people have loved in Hancock's body of work over the past decades, namely a mind-dilating exploration of the mysteries of the past, amazing archaeological discoveries, and profound implications for how we lead our lives today.

Mind Fixers: Psychiatry's Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness [Audiobook]

Mind Fixers: Psychiatry's Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness [Audiobook]
Mind Fixers: Psychiatry's Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness [Audiobook] by Anne Harrington, read by Joyce Bean
2019 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 11h 50m | 326.8MB

The story of the unfulfilled quest to find the biological basis of mental illness, and its profound effects on patients, families, and American society.

In the 1980s, American psychiatry announced that it was time to toss aside Freudian ideas of mental disorder because the true path to understanding and treating mental illness lay in brain science, biochemistry, and drugs. This sudden call to revolution, however, was not driven by any scientific breakthroughs. Nor was it as unprecedented as it seemed. Why had previous efforts stalled? Was this latest call really any different?

In Mind Fixers, Anne Harrington offers the first comprehensive history of the troubled search for the biological basis of mental illness. She makes clear that this story is not just about laboratories and clinical trials, but also momentous public policies, acrid professional rivalries, cultural upheavals, grassroots activism, and profit-mongering. Harrington traces a consistent thread of over-promising and frustrated hopes. Above all, she helps us understand why psychiatry's biological program is in crisis today, and what needs to happen next.