Absolutely on Music: Conversations [EPUB]

Absolutely on Music: Conversations [EPUB]
Absolutely on Music: Conversations by Haruki Murakami, Seiji Ozawa
2016 | EPUB | 5.0MB

A deeply personal, intimate conversation about music and writing between the internationally acclaimed, best-selling author and the former conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

In Absolutely on Music, internationally Haruki Murakami sits down with his friend Seiji Ozawa, the revered former conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, for a series of conversations on their shared passion: music. Over the course of two years, Murakami and Ozawa discuss everything from Brahms to Beethoven, from Leonard Bernstein to Glenn Gould, from Bartók to Mahler, and from pop-up orchestras to opera. They listen to and dissect recordings of some of their favorite performances, and Murakami questions Ozawa about his career conducting orchestras around the world.

Culminating in Murakami’s ten-day visit to the banks of Lake Geneva to observe Ozawa’s retreat for young musicians, the book is interspersed with ruminations on record collecting, jazz clubs, orchestra halls, film scores, and much more. A deep reflection on the essential nature of both music and writing, Absolutely on Music is an unprecedented glimpse into the minds of two maestros.

Life on a Young Planet: The First Three Billion Years of Evolution on Earth [EPUB]

Life on a Young Planet: The First Three Billion Years of Evolution on Earth [EPUB]
Life on a Young Planet: The First Three Billion Years of Evolution on Earth by Andrew H Knoll
2015 | EPUB | 4.03MB

Australopithecines, dinosaurs, trilobites--such fossils conjure up images of lost worlds filled with vanished organisms. But in the full history of life, ancient animals, even the trilobites, form only the half-billion-year tip of a nearly four-billion-year iceberg. Andrew Knoll explores the deep history of life from its origins on a young planet to the incredible Cambrian explosion, presenting a compelling new explanation for the emergence of biological novelty.

The very latest discoveries in paleontology--many of them made by the author and his students--are integrated with emerging insights from molecular biology and earth system science to forge a broad understanding of how the biological diversity that surrounds us came to be. Moving from Siberia to Namibia to the Bahamas, Knoll shows how life and environment have evolved together through Earth's history. Innovations in biology have helped shape our air and oceans, and, just as surely, environmental change has influenced the course of evolution, repeatedly closing off opportunities for some species while opening avenues for others.

Readers go into the field to confront fossils, enter the lab to discern the inner workings of cells, and alight on Mars to ask how our terrestrial experience can guide exploration for life beyond our planet. Along the way, Knoll brings us up-to-date on some of science's hottest questions, from the oldest fossils and claims of life beyond the Earth to the hypothesis of global glaciation and Knoll's own unifying concept of ''permissive ecology.''

In laying bare Earth's deepest biological roots, Life on a Young Planet helps us understand our own place in the universe--and our responsibility as stewards of a world four billion years in the making.

In a new preface, Knoll describes how the field has broadened and deepened in the decade since the book’s original publication.

Ancestors in Our Genome: The New Science of Human Evolution [EPUB]

Ancestors in Our Genome: The New Science of Human Evolution [EPUB]
Ancestors in Our Genome: The New Science of Human Evolution by Eugene E Harris
2014 | EPUB | 5.83MB

In 2001, scientists were finally able to determine the full human genome sequence, and with the discovery began a genomic voyage back in time. Since then, we have sequenced the full genomes of a number of mankind's primate relatives at a remarkable rate. The genomes of the common chimpanzee (2005) and bonobo (2012), orangutan (2011), gorilla (2012), and macaque monkey (2007) have already been identified, and the determination of other primate genomes is well underway. Researchers are beginning to unravel our full genomic history, comparing it with closely related species to answer age-old questions about how and when we evolved. For the first time, we are finding our own ancestors in our genome and are thereby gleaning new information about our evolutionary past.

In Ancestors in Our Genome, molecular anthropologist Eugene E. Harris presents us with a complete and up-to-date account of the evolution of the human genome and our species. Written from the perspective of population genetics, and in simple terms, the book traces human origins back to their source among our earliest human ancestors, and explains many of the most intriguing questions that genome scientists are currently working to answer. For example, what does the high level of discordance among the gene trees of humans and the African great apes tell us about our respective separations from our common ancestor? Was our separation from the apes fast or slow, and when and why did it occur? Where, when, and how did our modern species evolve? How do we search across genomes to find the genomic underpinnings of our large and complex brains and language abilities? How can we find the genomic bases for life at high altitudes, for lactose tolerance, resistance to disease, and for our different skin pigmentations? How and when did we interbreed with Neandertals and the recently discovered ancient Denisovans of Asia?

Harris draws upon extensive experience researching primate evolution in order to deliver a lively and thorough history of human evolution. Ancestors in Our Genome is the most complete discussion of our current understanding of the human genome available.

Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe [Audiobook]

Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe [Audiobook]
Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe [Audiobook] by Lisa Randall, read by Carrington MacDuffie
2015 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 12 hrs 32 mins | 344.9MB

In this brilliant exploration of our cosmic environment, the renowned particle physicist and New York Times best-selling author of Warped Passages and Knocking on Heaven's Door uses her research into dark matter to illuminate the startling connections between the furthest reaches of space and life here on Earth.

Sixty-six million years ago, an object the size of a city descended from space to crash into Earth, creating a devastating cataclysm that killed off the dinosaurs, along with three-quarters of the other species on the planet. What was its origin? In Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs, Lisa Randall proposes it was a comet that was dislodged from its orbit as the solar system passed through a disk of dark matter embedded in the Milky Way. In a sense it might have been dark matter that killed the dinosaurs.

Working through the background and consequences of this proposal, Randall shares with us the latest findings - established and speculative - regarding the nature and role of dark matter and the origin of the universe, our galaxy, our solar system, and life, along with the process by which scientists explore new concepts. In Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs, Randall tells a breathtaking story that weaves together the cosmos' history and our own, illuminating the deep relationships that are critical to our world and the astonishing beauty inherent in the most familiar things.

Humankind: How Biology and Geography Shape Human Diversity [EPUB]

Humankind: How Biology and Geography Shape Human Diversity [EPUB]
Humankind: How Biology and Geography Shape Human Diversity by Alexander H Harcourt
2015 | EPUB | 6.16MB

An innovative and illuminating look at how the evolution of the human species has been shaped by the world around us, from anatomy and physiology, to cultural diversity and population density.

Where did the human species originate? Why are tropical peoples much more diverse than those at polar latitudes? Why can only Japanese peoples digest seaweed? How are darker skin, sunlight, and fertility related? Did Neanderthals and Homo Sapiens ever interbreed? In Humankind, U. C. Davis professor Alexander Harcourt answers these questions and more, as he explains how the expansion of the human species around the globe and our interaction with our environment explains much about why humans differ from one region of the world to another, not only biologically, but culturally.

What effects have other species had on the distribution of humans around the world, and we, in turn, on their distribution? And how have human populations affected each other’s geography, even existence? For the first time in a single book, Alexander Harcourt brings these topics together to help us understand why we are, what we are, where we are.

It turns out that when one looks at humanity's expansion around the world, and in the biological explanations for our geographic diversity, we humans are often just another primate. Humanity's distribution around the world and the type of organism we are today has been shaped by the same biogeographical forces that shape other species.

Domesticated: Evolution in a Man-Made World [Audiobook]

Domesticated: Evolution in a Man-Made World [Audiobook]
Domesticated: Evolution in a Man-Made World [Audiobook] by Richard C Francis, read by Eric Martin
2015 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 13 hrs 6 mins | 360.82MB

Without our domesticated plants and animals, human civilization as we know it would not exist.

We would still be living at subsistence level as hunter-gatherers if not for domestication. It is no accident that the cradle of civilization - the Middle East - is where sheep, goats, pigs, cattle, and cats commenced their fatefully intimate associations with humans.

Before the agricultural revolution, there were perhaps 10 million humans on Earth. Now there are more than seven billion of us. Our domesticated species have also thrived, in stark contrast to their wild ancestors. In a human-constructed environment - or manmade world - it pays to be domesticated.

Domestication is an evolutionary process first and foremost. What most distinguishes domesticated animals from their wild ancestors are genetic alterations resulting in tameness, the capacity to tolerate close human proximity. But selection for tameness often results in a host of seemingly unrelated by-products, including floppy ears, skeletal alterations, reduced aggression, increased sociality, and reduced brain size. It's a package deal known as the domestication syndrome.

Elements of the domestication syndrome can be found in every domesticated species - not only cats, dogs, pigs, sheep, cattle, and horses but also more recent human creations, such as domesticated camels, reindeer, and laboratory rats. That domestication results in this suite of changes in such a wide variety of mammals is a fascinating evolutionary story, one that sheds much light on the evolutionary process in general.

We humans, too, show signs of the domestication syndrome, which some believe was key to our evolutionary success. By this view human evolution parallels the evolution of dogs from wolves, in particular.

The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack: And Other Cautionary Tales from Human Evolution [Audiobook]

The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack: And Other Cautionary Tales from Human Evolution [Audiobook]
The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack: And Other Cautionary Tales from Human Evolution [Audiobook] by Ian Tattersall, read by Tom Perkins
2015 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 24 mins | 259.05MB

In his new book The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack, human paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall argues that a long tradition of "human exceptionalism" in paleoanthropology has distorted the picture of human evolution. Drawing partly on his own career―from young scientist in awe of his elders to crotchety elder statesman―Tattersall offers an idiosyncratic look at the competitive world of paleoanthropology, beginning with Charles Darwin 150 years ago, and continuing through the Leakey dynasty in Africa, and concluding with the latest astonishing findings in the Caucasus.

The book's title refers to the 1856 discovery of a clearly very old skull cap in Germany's Neander Valley. The possessor had a brain as large as a modern human, but a heavy low braincase with a prominent brow ridge. Scientists tried hard to explain away the inconvenient possibility that this was not actually our direct relative. One extreme interpretation suggested that the preserved leg bones were curved by both rickets, and by a life on horseback. The pain of the unfortunate individual's affliction had caused him to chronically furrow his brow in agony, leading to the excessive development of bone above the eye sockets.

The subsequent history of human evolutionary studies is full of similarly fanciful interpretations. With tact and humor, Tattersall concludes that we are not the perfected products of natural processes, but instead the result of substantial doses of random happenstance.

Lone Survivors: How We Came to Be the Only Humans on Earth [EPUB]

Lone Survivors: How We Came to Be the Only Humans on Earth [EPUB]
Lone Survivors: How We Came to Be the Only Humans on Earth by Chris Stringer
2012 | EPUB | 1.35MB

A leading anthropology researcher on human evolution proposes a new and controversial theory of how our species came to be

In this groundbreaking and engaging work of science, world-renowned paleoanthropologist Chris Stringer sets out a new theory of humanity's origin, challenging both the multiregionalists (who hold that modern humans developed from ancient ancestors in different parts of the world) and his own "out of Africa" theory, which maintains that humans emerged rapidly in one small part of Africa and then spread to replace all other humans within and outside the continent. Stringer's new theory, based on archeological and genetic evidence, holds that distinct humans coexisted and competed across the African continent-exchanging genes, tools, and behavioral strategies.

Stringer draws on analyses of old and new fossils from around the world, DNA studies of Neanderthals (using the full genome map) and other species, and recent archeological digs to unveil his new theory. He shows how the most sensational recent fossil findings fit with his model, and he questions previous concepts (including his own) of modernity and how it evolved.

Lone Survivors is the definitive account of who and what we were, and will change perceptions about our origins and about what it means to be human.

A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race, and Human History [Audiobook]

A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race, and Human History [Audiobook]
A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race, and Human History [Audiobook] by Nicholas Wade, read by Alan Sklar
2014 | MP3 VBR V5 kbps + EPUB | 10 hrs 49 mins | 446.92MB

Drawing on startling new evidence from the mapping of the genome, an explosive new account of the genetic basis of race and its role in the human story.

Fewer ideas have been more toxic or harmful than the idea of the biological reality of race, and with it the idea that humans of different races are biologically different from one another. For this understandable reason, the idea has been banished from polite academic conversation. Arguing that race is more than just a social construct can get a scholar run out of town, or at least off campus, on a rail. Human evolution, the consensus view insists, ended in prehistory.

Inconveniently, as Nicholas Wade argues in A Troublesome Inheritance, the consensus view cannot be right. And in fact, we know that populations have changed in the past few thousand years - to be lactose tolerant, for example, and to survive at high altitudes. Race is not a bright-line distinction; by definition it means that the more human populations are kept apart, the more they evolve their own distinct traits under the selective pressure known as Darwinian evolution. For many thousands of years, most human populations stayed where they were and grew distinct, not just in outward appearance but in deeper senses as well.

Wade, the longtime journalist covering genetic advances for The New York Times, draws widely on the work of scientists who have made crucial breakthroughs in establishing the reality of recent human evolution. The most provocative claims in this book involve the genetic basis of human social habits. What we might call middle-class social traits - thrift, docility, nonviolence - have been slowly but surely inculcated genetically within agrarian societies, Wade argues. These "values" obviously had a strong cultural component, but Wade points to evidence that agrarian societies evolved away from hunter-gatherer societies in some crucial respects. Also controversial are his findings regarding the genetic basis of traits we associate with intelligence, such as literacy and numeracy, in certain ethnic populations, including the Chinese and Ashkenazi Jews.

Wade believes deeply in the fundamental equality of all human peoples. He also believes that science is best served by pursuing the truth without fear, and if his mission to arrive at a coherent summa of what the new genetic science does and does not tell us about race and human history leads straight into a minefield, then so be it. This will not be the last word on the subject, but it will begin a powerful and overdue conversation.

The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution [EPUB]

The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution [EPUB]
The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution by Gregory Cochran, Henry Harpending
2009 | EPUB | 1.15MB

Resistance to malaria. Blue eyes. Lactose tolerance. What do all of these traits have in common? Every one of them has emerged in the last 10,000 years.

Scientists have long believed that the “great leap forward” that occurred some 40,000 to 50,000 years ago in Europe marked end of significant biological evolution in humans. In this stunningly original account of our evolutionary history, top scholars Gregory Cochran and Henry Harpending reject this conventional wisdom and reveal that the human species has undergone a storm of genetic change much more recently. Human evolution in fact accelerated after civilization arose, they contend, and these ongoing changes have played a pivotal role in human history. They argue that biology explains the expansion of the Indo-Europeans, the European conquest of the Americas, and European Jews' rise to intellectual prominence. In each of these cases, the key was recent genetic change: adult milk tolerance in the early Indo-Europeans that allowed for a new way of life, increased disease resistance among the Europeans settling America, and new versions of neurological genes among European Jews.

Ranging across subjects as diverse as human domestication, Neanderthal hybridization, and IQ tests, Cochran and Harpending's analysis demonstrates convincingly that human genetics have changed and can continue to change much more rapidly than scientists have previously believed. A provocative and fascinating new look at human evolution that turns conventional wisdom on its head, The 10,000 Year Explosion reveals the ongoing interplay between culture and biology in the making of the human race.

Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose [EPUB]

Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose [EPUB]
Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose by Deirdre Barrett
2010 | EPUB | 1.27MB

A Harvard psychologist explains how our once-helpful instincts get hijacked in our garish modern world.

Our instincts―for food, sex, or territorial protection― evolved for life on the savannahs 10,000 years ago, not in today’s world of densely populated cities, technological innovations, and pollution. We now have access to a glut of larger-than-life objects, from candy to pornography to atomic weapons―that gratify these gut instincts with often-dangerous results. Animal biologists coined the term “supernormal stimuli” to describe imitations that appeal to primitive instincts and exert a stronger pull than real things, such as soccer balls that geese prefer over eggs.

Evolutionary psychologist Deirdre Barrett applies this concept to the alarming disconnect between human instinct and our created environment, demonstrating how supernormal stimuli are a major cause of today’s most pressing problems, including obesity and war. However, Barrett does more than show how unfettered instincts fuel dangerous excesses. She also reminds us that by exercising self-control we can rein them in, potentially saving ourselves and civilization.

Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters [Audiobook]

Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters [Audiobook]
Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters: From Dating, Shopping, and Praying to Going to War and Becoming a Billionaire [Audiobook] by Satoshi Kanazawa, Alan S Miller, read by Stephen Hoye
2007 | MP3@128 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 11 mins | 333.64MB

A lively and provocative look at how evolution shapes our behavior and our lives.

Contrary to conventional wisdom, our brains and bodies are hardwired to carry out an evolutionary mission that determines much of what we do, from life plans to everyday decisions.

With an accessible tone and a healthy disregard for political correctness, this lively and eminently readable book popularizes the latest research in a cutting-edge field of study-one that turns much of what we thought we knew about human nature upside-down.

Every time we fall in love, fight with our spouse, enjoy watching a favorite TV show, or feel scared--walking alone at night, we are in part behaving as a human animal with its own unique nature-a nature that essentially stopped evolving 10,000 years ago. Alan S. Miller and Satoshi Kanazawa re-examine some of the most popular and controversial topics of modern life-and shed a whole new light on why we do the things we do.

Reader beware: You may never look at human nature the same way again.

Mate: Become the Man Women Want [Audiobook]

Mate: Become the Man Women Want [Audiobook]
Mate: Become the Man Women Want [Audiobook] by Tucker Max, Geoffrey Miller, read by Geoffrey Miller
2015 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 12 hrs 43 mins | 347.68MB

The number-one best-selling pioneer of "fratire" and a leading evolutionary psychologist team up to create the dating book for guys.

Whether they conducted their research in life or in the lab, experts Tucker Max and Dr. Geoffrey Miller have spent the last 20-plus years learning what women really want from their men, why they want it, and how men can deliver those qualities.

The short answer: Become the best version of yourself possible, then show it off. It sounds simple, but it's not. If it were, Tinder would just be the stuff you use to start a fire. Becoming your best self requires honesty, self-awareness, hard work, and a little help.

Through their website and podcasts, Max and Miller have already helped over one million guys take their first steps toward Miss Right. They have collected all of their findings in Mate, an evidence-driven, seriously funny playbook that will teach you to become a more sexually attractive and romantically successful man, the right way:

  • No "seduction techniques"
  • No moralizing
  • No bullshit

Just honest, straightforward talk about the most ethical, effective way to pursue the win-win relationships you want with the women who are best for you.

Much of what they've discovered will surprise you, some of it will not, but all of it is important and often misunderstood. So listen up, and stop being stupid!

The Mating Mind: How Sexual Choice Shaped the Evolution of Human Nature [EPUB]

The Mating Mind: How Sexual Choice Shaped the Evolution of Human Nature [EPUB]
The Mating Mind: How Sexual Choice Shaped the Evolution of Human Nature by Geoffrey Miller
2011 | EPUB | 2.06MB

At once a pioneering study of evolution and an accessible and lively reading experience, The Mating Mind marks the arrival of a prescient and provocative new science writer. Psychologist Geoffrey Miller offers the most convincing–and radical–explanation for how and why the human mind evolved.

Consciousness, morality, creativity, language, and art: these are the traits that make us human. Scientists have traditionally explained these qualities as merely a side effect of surplus brain size, but Miller argues that they were sexual attractors, not side effects. He bases his argument on Darwin’ s theory of sexual selection, which until now has played second fiddle to Darwin’ s theory of natural selection, and draws on ideas and research from a wide range of fields, including psychology, economics, history, and pop culture. Witty, powerfully argued, and continually thought-provoking, The Mating Mind is a landmark in our understanding of our own species.

The First Idea: How Symbols, Language, and Intelligence Evolved from Our Primate Ancestors to Modern Humans [EPUB]

The First Idea: How Symbols, Language, and Intelligence Evolved from Our Primate Ancestors to Modern Humans [EPUB]
The First Idea: How Symbols, Language, and Intelligence Evolved from Our Primate Ancestors to Modern Humans by Stanley I Greenspan, Stuart Shanker
2009 | EPUB | 1.12MB

In the childhood of every human being and at the dawn of human history there is an amazing and, until now, unexplained leap from simple genetically programmed behavior to language, symbolic thinking, and culture.

In The First Idea, Stanley Greenspan and Stuart Shanker explore this missing link and offer brilliant new insights into two longstanding questions: how human beings first create symbols and how these abilities evolved and were transmitted across generations over millions of years. From fascinating research into the intelligence of both human infants and apes, they identify certain cultural practices that are vitally important if we are to have stable and reflective future societies.

Political Animals: How Our Stone-Age Brain Gets in the Way of Smart Politics [Audiobook]

Political Animals: How Our Stone-Age Brain Gets in the Way of Smart Politics [Audiobook]
Political Animals: How Our Stone-Age Brain Gets in the Way of Smart Politics [Audiobook] by Rick Shenkman, read by Tom Zingarelli
2016 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 11 hrs 4 mins | 302.1MB

Can a football game affect the outcome of an election? What about shark attacks? Or a drought? In a rational world the answer, of course, would be no. But as best-selling historian Rick Shenkman shows in Political Animals, our world is anything but rational.

This isn't because we aren't smart. Instead, modern cues are setting off ancient, instinctive responses that worked to keep us safe in the Stone Age but lead us astray today. Pop culture tells us we can trust our instincts. But science is demonstrating that when it comes to politics, our Stone Age brains can malfunction and misfire. Fortunately, we can learn to override our instincts and ensure that they work in our favor.

Drawing on science, politics, and history, Shenkman explores the hidden reasons behind our political choices and uncovers the invisible forces that are truly responsible for victory or defeat at the ballot box.

The Compassionate Brain: How Empathy Creates Intelligence [EPUB]

The Compassionate Brain: How Empathy Creates Intelligence [EPUB]
The Compassionate Brain: How Empathy Creates Intelligence by Gerald Huther
2013 | EPUB | 0.6MB

Here is the ultimate explanation of the brain for everyone who thinks: a guide to how the brain works, how our brains came to operate the way they do, and, most important, how to use your precious gray matter to its full capacity.

The brain, according to current research, is not some kind of automatic machine that works independently of its user. In fact, the circuitry of the brain actually changes according to how one uses it. Our brains are continuously developing new capacities and refinements—or losing them, depending upon how we use them. Gerald Hüther takes us on a fascinating tour of the brain's development—from one-celled organisms to worms, moles, apes, and on to us humans—showing how we truly are what we think: our behavior directly affects our brain capacity. And the behavior that promotes the fullest development of the brain is behavior that balances emotion and intellect, dependence and autonomy, openness and focus, and ultimately expresses itself in such virtues as truthfulness, considerateness, sincerity, humility, and love.

Hüther's user's-manual approach is humorous and engaging, with a minimum of technical language, yet the book's message is profound: the fundamental nature of our brains and nervous systems naturally leads to our continued growth in intelligence and humanity.

Secrets from the Sex Lab: From First Kiss to Last Gasp, How You Can Be Better in Bed [EPUB]

Secrets from the Sex Lab: From First Kiss to Last Gasp, How You Can Be Better in Bed [EPUB]
Secrets from the Sex Lab: From First Kiss to Last Gasp, How You Can Be Better in Bed by Judy Dutton
2009 | EPUB | 2.6MB

Did you know that the scent that turns men on the most is pumpkin pie mixed with lavender? And that women have been known to go wild from a whiff of Good & Plenty and cucumber?

For anyone who wants to know more about sex, attraction, and how to improve his or her chances with someone cute comes this indispensable resource from Judy Dutton. Secrets from the Sex Lab takes you into the simmering world of sex researchers who have been documenting the many esoteric aspects of the erotic realm for years. With this book the laboratory door is finally open to you.

Follow the fictional couple John and Jane as they meet, flirt, kiss, have sex, and try to figure out what their attraction means and what to do about it. Backed by hundreds of scientific studies and interviews with people just like you, Judy Dutton reveals the why behind John’s impulse to rip Jane’s clothes off before he gets to know her. Even more than the science, though, Secrets from the Sex Lab gives you hands-on lessons on how to take your sex life up a notch and put science to good use.

  • What’s the best way to handle someone’s hot spots?
  • Are men more promiscuous than women?
  • Does size really matter?
  • What brings on bigger, better orgasms?
  • Can a brain scan tell if you’re in love or just in lust?
  • Will there ever be a women’s version of Viagra?
  • Why should women plan dates around their ovulation schedule?
  • Why are men with names containing i or e more attractive?
  • Why do women always seem to fall for jerks?
  • Why do men chase women who are much younger than they are?

Nowadays, anyone on the Web can call themselves a “sexpert” but have no more credentials than your clueless best friend. Judy Dutton interviews the real experts who devote their lives–and their graduate degrees–to the subject of sex. But all her research wasn’t done solely with people in white coats. She also hit the streets to see just what’s going on in the world of attraction. As a result, Secrets from the Sex Lab is an illuminating and accurate look at what turns us on, what turns us off, and how we can get better in the sack.

The Beauty of a Social Problem: Photography, Autonomy, Economy [EPUB]

The Beauty of a Social Problem: Photography, Autonomy, Economy [EPUB]
The Beauty of a Social Problem: Photography, Autonomy, Economy by Walter Benn Michaels
2015 | EPUB | 7.54MB

Bertolt Brecht once worried that our sympathy for the victims of a social problem can make the problem’s “beauty and attraction” invisible. In The Beauty of a Social Problem, Walter Benn Michaels explores the effort to overcome this difficulty through a study of several contemporary artist-photographers whose work speaks to questions of political economy.

Although he discusses well-known figures like Walker Evans and Jeff Wall, Michaels’s focus is on a group of younger artists, including Viktoria Binschtok, Phil Chang, Liz Deschenes, and Arthur Ou. All born after 1965, they have always lived in a world where, on the one hand, artistic ambition has been synonymous with the critique of autonomous form and intentional meaning, while, on the other, the struggle between capital and labor has essentially been won by capital. Contending that the aesthetic and political conditions are connected, Michaels argues that these artists’ new commitment to form and meaning is a way for them to depict the conditions that have taken US economic inequality from its lowest level, in 1968, to its highest level today. As Michaels demonstrates, these works of art, unimaginable without the postmodern critique of autonomy and intentionality, end up departing and dissenting from that critique in continually interesting and innovative ways.

Photography: The Key Concepts, 2nd Edition [EPUB]

Photography: The Key Concepts, 2nd Edition [EPUB]
Photography: The Key Concepts, 2nd Edition by David Bate
2016 | EPUB | 9.57MB

Providing a thorough and comprehensive introduction to the study of photography, this second edition of Photography: The Key Concepts has been expanded and updated to cover more fully contemporary changes to photography.

Photography is a part of everyday life; from news and advertisements, to data collection and surveillance, to the shaping of personal and social identity, we are constantly surrounded by the photographic image. Outlining an overview of photographic genres, David Bate explores how these varied practices can be coded and interpreted using key theoretical models. Building upon the genres included in the first edition – documentary, portraiture, landscape, still life, art and global photography – this second edition includes two new chapters on snapshots and the act of looking. The revised and expanded chapters are supported by over three times as many photographs as in the first edition, examining contemporary practices in more detail and equipping students with the analytical skills they need, both in their academic studies and in their own practical work.

An indispensable guide to the field, Photography: The Key Concepts is core reading for all courses that consider the place of photography in society, within photographic practice, visual culture, art, media and cultural studies.

Lighting People: A Photographer's Reference [EPUB]

Lighting People: A Photographer's Reference [EPUB]
Lighting People: A Photographer's Reference by Rossella Vanon
2016 | EPUB | 107.29MB

This book utilizes award winning photographer Rossella Vanon’s contemporary style and up-to-the-minute knowledge to teach how each kind of light works. This approach provides a key grounding for photographers, followed by creative techniques that go beyond traditional approaches. Unique to this book is a reference section that clearly presents a series of photographs of the same four models, representing different gender and ethnic groups, shot from different lighting positions and against different backgrounds. This versatile segment is organized in such a way that photographers can study it for hours when time permits or flip through it in moments while shooting.

A Photographer's Life: A Journey from Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photojournalist to Celebrated Nature Photographer [EPUB]

A Photographer's Life: A Journey from Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photojournalist to Celebrated Nature Photographer [EPUB]
A Photographer's Life: A Journey from Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photojournalist to Celebrated Nature Photographer by Jack Dykinga
2016 | EPUB | 13.46MB

It’s not often that a career in photography makes as many twists and turns as it has for Jack Dykinga. Early in Jack's career as a photojournalist he won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography. He then worked as a photo editor and later became a wilderness guide. Today, Jack’s work as a landscape photographer is world-renowned.

After a near-death experience, Jack formed a new perspective that provided a framework for self examination and a deeper look into why images resonate with a photographer’s feelings. As the images displayed in this book progress through the distinct periods in Jack’s life, he describes the influences and events that shaped his changing style and his design sense. With an intense sense of gratitude, he explains the forces that caused his focus to evolve, and he describes the often-subtle changes that define his work.

A virtual “who’s who” of editors, writers, and photographers have influenced Jack’s photographic journey, which has spanned 50 years. His amassed images form a body of work that is diverse and profound. From huddled figures in mental institutions to sweeping landscapes, his images span an enormous emotional range from disturbing to celebratory to sublime. They are touchstones in a life of photography.

Creative Workflow in Lightroom [EPUB]

Creative Workflow in Lightroom [EPUB]
Creative Workflow in Lightroom: The photographer’s guide to managing, developing, and sharing your work by Jason Bradley
2016 | EPUB | 17.29MB

Adobe’s Lightroom has emerged as a must-have software due to its powerful editing tools and time saving organizational capabilities but how you establish a personalized, creative workflow that optimizes this technology, your time, and your art eludes most photographers. Jason Bradley, award-winning photographer and Lightroom pro, shares the answers to these questions in this practical and easy to follow guide that taps into the "how" and the "why" of a professional photographer’s creative workflow in Lightroom.

Bradley will show you how all workflows can be simplified into three steps: establishing, managing, and rendering the file, alongside stunning photographs and explanations from his own experiences. This book will not only teach you how to work within Lightroom but, ultimately, how to make Lightroom work for you.

RSPB Guide to Digital Wildlife Photography, 2nd Edition [EPUB]

RSPB Guide to Digital Wildlife Photography, 2nd Edition [EPUB]
RSPB Guide to Digital Wildlife Photography, 2nd Edition by David Tipling
2016 | EPUB | 15.8MB

This helpful and practical RSPB guide to all aspects of digital wildlife photography is an updated version of our first edition. It is accessibly written by and beautifully illustrated with the work of one of Britain's best known wildlife photographers. The book's elegant design makes the most of the author's incredible photos and informative text. The book discusses all aspects of digital wildlife photography, from equipment, fieldcraft, locations and composition, post-processing and computer manipulation of images, through to getting your photos published.

This is the ultimate reference book for all aspiring and established natural history photographers, and will equip its readers with everything they need to know to help them take better digital wildlife photographs.

Portraits by Damien Lovegrove [PDF]

Portraits by Damien Lovegrove [PDF]
Portraits by Damien Lovegrove
2016 | PDF | 1.17GB

“Everything I know about portrait photography is in this book. I hope it helps you to achieve a lifetime of enjoyment from your photography.”

In this no-holds-barred e-book, I deconstruct my complete portrait making process. From the planning stages and capture, through to delivery and archive – it’s all here. I reveal my secrets of creative success and the proven techniques I employ to capture fabulous portraits anywhere, at any time.

  • 356 richly illustrated pages
  • 384 high res photographs with all the exposure and lighting details used to create them
  • Over 50,000 words of creative vision that took me over two years to write
  • Everything you need to know in one place
  • An expert design with a layout that delivers the best reader experience for you

The Fujifilm X System Guide for Portrait Photographers [PDF]

The Fujifilm X System Guide for Portrait Photographers [PDF]
The Fujifilm X System Guide for Portrait Photographers by Damien Lovegrove
2016 | PDF | 195.12MB

Fujifilm UK X-Ambassador, Damien Lovegrove, gives an in-depth explanation of the Fujifilm X system. This e-book is packed with information and gives a complete overview of the camera system – including technical settings, how to use them and the vast possibilities it provides.

  • 92 richly illustrated pages
  • Details of the cameras and lenses that are currently available
  • Explanations about the camera settings that Damien uses
  • The benefits of individual cameras and lenses
  • Recommendations for ideal lens sets
  • High res photographs with all the exposure and lighting details used to create them

Blizzard of Glass: The Halifax Explosion of 1917 [EPUB]

Blizzard of Glass: The Halifax Explosion of 1917 [EPUB]
Blizzard of Glass: The Halifax Explosion of 1917 by Sally M Walker
2016 | EPUB | 2.33MB

On December 6, 1917, two ships collided in Halifax Harbor in Nova Scotia, Canada. One ship was loaded top to bottom with munitions and the other held relief supplies, both intended for war-torn Europe. The resulting blast flattened two towns, Halifax and Dartmouth, and killed nearly 2,000 people. As if that wasn't devastating enough, a blizzard hit the next day, dumping more than a foot of snow on the area and paralyzing much-needed relief efforts.

Fascinating, edge-of-your-seat storytelling based on original source material conveys this harrowing account of tragedy and recovery.

This thoroughly-researched and documented book can be worked into multiple aspects of the common core curriculum.

The Grid: The Fraying Wires Between Americans and Our Energy Future [Audiobook]

The Grid: The Fraying Wires Between Americans and Our Energy Future [Audiobook]
The Grid: The Fraying Wires Between Americans and Our Energy Future [Audiobook] by Gretchen Bakke, read by Emily Caudwell
2016 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 11 hrs 8 mins | 306.49MB

The grid is an accident of history and of culture, in no way intrinsic to how we produce, deliver and consume electrical power. Yet this is the system the United States ended up with, a jerry-built structure now so rickety and near collapse that a strong wind or a hot day can bring it to a grinding halt.

The grid is now under threat from a new source: renewable and variable energy, which puts stress on its logics as much as its components.

In an entertaining, perceptive and deeply researched fashion, cultural anthropologist Gretchen Bakke uses the history of an increasingly outdated infrastructure to show how the United States has gone from seemingly infinite technological prowess to a land of structural instability. She brings humor and a bright eye to contemporary solutions and to the often surprising ways in which these succeed or fail. And the consequences of failure are significant.

Our national electrical grid grew during an era when monopoly, centralisation and standardisation meant strength. Yet as we've increasingly become a nation that caters to local needs, and as a plethora of new renewable energy sources comes online, our massive system is dangerously out of step.

Charting the history of our electrical grid, Bakke helps us see what we all take for granted, shows it as central to our culture and identity as a people and reveals it to be the linchpin in our aspirations for a clean-energy future.

The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps [EPUB]

The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps [EPUB]
The Phantom Atlas: The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps by Edward Brooke-Hitching
2016 | EPUB | 411.7MB

The Phantom Atlas is an atlas of the world not as it ever existed, but as it was thought to be. These marvellous and mysterious phantoms - non-existent islands, invented mountain ranges, mythical civilisations and other fictitious geography - were all at various times presented as facts on maps and atlases. This book is a collection of striking antique maps that display the most erroneous cartography, with each illustration accompanied by the story behind it.

Exploration, map-making and mythology are all brought together to create a colourful tapestry of monsters, heroes and volcanoes; swindlers, mirages and murderers. Sometimes the stories are almost impossible to believe, and remarkably, some of the errors were still on display in maps published in the 21st century. Throughout much of the 19th century more than 40 different mapmakers included the Mountains of Kong, a huge range of peaks stretching across the entire continent of Africa, in their maps - but it was only in 1889 when Louis Gustave Binger revealed the whole thing to be a fake. For centuries, explorers who headed to Patagonia returned with tales of the giants they had met who lived there, some nine feet tall. Then there was Gregor MacGregor, a Scottish explorer who returned to London to sell shares in a land he had discovered in South America. He had been appointed the Cazique of Poyais, and bestowed with many honours by the local king of this unspoiled paradise. Now he was offering others the chance to join him and make their fortune there, too - once they had paid him a bargain fee for their passage...

The Phantom Atlas is a beautifully produced volume, packed with stunning maps and drawings of places and people that never existed. The remarkable stories behind them all are brilliantly told by Edward Brooke-Hitching in a book that will appeal to cartophiles everywhere.

The Complete History of Black Sabbath: What Evil Lurks [EPUB]

The Complete History of Black Sabbath: What Evil Lurks [EPUB]
The Complete History of Black Sabbath: What Evil Lurks by Joel Mciver
2016 | EPUB | 33.38MB

They are the band that created metal music . . . and they have defined it for more than four decades. Black Sabbath's career spans eleven different line-ups and nineteen studio albums in addition to the twenty-eight solo albums of the original four members.

The band began in 1968 as a blues rock band on the cover circuit of Birmingham, England. Clawing their way up from the postwar bombed-out suburbs of Birmingham, the four members - guitarist and main songwriter Tony Iommi, bassist and main lyricist Geezer Butler, singer Ozzy Osbourne, and drummer Bill Ward - would define a new genre of music and make themselves world famous.

Joel McIver explores the complete history of Sabbath, from the precursor bands to the release of the holy trinity of heavy metal - "Black Sabbath" (the song) on Black Sabbath (the album) by Black Sabbath (the band) - to the present. With over 150 photos, a gatefold family tree tracing the development of the band, a complete discography, and a foreword by Machine Head frontman Robb Flynn, this is the must-have book for any Sabbath fan.

5 Ingredient Fix: Easy, Elegant, and Irresistible Recipes [EPUB]

5 Ingredient Fix: Easy, Elegant, and Irresistible Recipes [EPUB]
5 Ingredient Fix: Easy, Elegant, and Irresistible Recipes by Claire Robinson
2010 | EPUB | 40.87MB

Claire Robinson, the hot new Food Network star of 5 Ingredient Fix and Food Network Challenge, helps people get dinner on the table with little fuss and a few great ingredients.

The quest for simple, affordable, and fresh, mouthwatering food is over. 5 INGREDIENT FIX helps put delicious and sophisticated meals on the table in a snap. With people struggling to simplify, streamline, and budget, the Food Network's Claire Robinson is here to help. Cooking doesn't have to be complicated to be impressive; simplifying the process with fewer ingredients saves time, frustration, and ultimately, money. From breakfast treats like Brioche French Toast with Strawberries and Cream to no-fuss meals like Grown-up Grilled Cheese and Iceberg Wedges with Buttermilk Dressing to a romantic dinner of Grilled Scallops with Saffron Aioli and Green Goddess Rice, all of Robinson's recipes have five or fewer ingredients. A quick trip to the supermarket for one bag of groceries, and a delicious, restaurant-quality meal can be on the table in no time.

Cooking Light Fresh Food Fast: Weeknight Meals: Over 280 Incredible Supper Solutions [EPUB]

Cooking Light Fresh Food Fast: Weeknight Meals: Over 280 Incredible Supper Solutions [EPUB]
Cooking Light Fresh Food Fast: Weeknight Meals: Over 280 Incredible Supper Solutions by Editors of Cooking Light Magazine
2010 | EPUB | 24.57MB

Dinnertime stress is over! Enjoy over 280 all-new 5-ingredient, 5-minute recipes guaranteed to come together easily from start to finish-fast. With options for 2, 4, or 6 servings, households of all sizes can share a home-cooked meal. These Test Kitchen approved recipes are tailor-made for hectic lifestyles and health-conscious families.

More than recipes...
This must-have collection offers over 160 full-color photographs, detailed nutritional analyses, ways to streamline prep so dinner is ready even faster, easy make-ahead options, assorted 10-minute side dishes, and suggestions for turning leftovers into tasty lunches-to-go.

Tips you can trust...
Helpful shortcut kitchen techniques show you how to shave minutes off your prep time, while simple ingredient pairing tips teach you to effortlessly craft a variety of mouthwatering meals from just a few flavor-boosting items.

Serving wholesome, homecooked meals on busy evenings just got easier thanks to Cooking Light Fresh Food Fast Weeknight Meals. Family meals return with these ready-in-minutes recipes for healthy, delicious, satisfying dishes.

Chocolate Holidays: Unforgettable Desserts for Every Season [EPUB]

Chocolate Holidays: Unforgettable Desserts for Every Season [EPUB]
Chocolate Holidays: Unforgettable Desserts for Every Season by Alice Medrich
2015 | EPUB | 63.84MB

Dramatic, seductive, playful, infinite in its variety, otherworldly in its taste: It's chocolate, and here's all the impetus you need to indulge your passion for it every day of the year. The beloved Alice Medrich, renowned for impeccable recipes that produce stellar results, has written Chocolate Holidays especially for people who love to bake but don't have enough hours in the day. Without compromising on flavor, texture, or ingredients, she pares down the preparation steps, teaches us resraint, and comes up with fifty amazing recipes, each a little jewel of elegance and simplicty.

An ideal year in chocolate might start with a New Year's brunch starring Chocolate Blini with Berry Caviar. Then there are Valentine's Day chocolate scones and St. Patrick's Day Irish Coffee Chocolate Mousse. And of course any "holiday" your imagination can conjure up is a perfect reason to indulge: perhaps a decadently rich hot chocolate served in demitasse portions to exorcise those end-of-February blues.

Spring might whisper chocolate Giant Krispy Easter Treats or a Passover Chocolate Nut Sponge Torte, or white chocolate-glazed Apricot Orange Cupcakes for a wedding shower. Summer suggests fruit and ice cream desserts such as the Independence Day red, white, and blue sundaes, followed by autumn's pies and tarts laden with chocolate and nuts. And no matter what you've been putting on the table for Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays past, it will be out-chocolated by Alice's Chocolate Cranberry Pudding and her Chocolate Hazelnut Roulade—both unequivocally year-end musts.

In Chocolate Holidays, Medrich unlocks the secrets of our favorite sweet, offering chocolate desserts for every season, for every reason.

Ingredients: A Visual Exploration of 75 Additives & 25 Food Products [EPUB]

Ingredients: A Visual Exploration of 75 Additives & 25 Food Products [EPUB]
Ingredients: A Visual Exploration of 75 Additives & 25 Food Products by Dwight Eschliman, Steve Ettlinger
2016 | EPUB | 62.77MB

In the bestselling tradition of The Elements and Salt Sugar Fat, an unprecedented visual exploration of what is really inside our food, setting the record straight on the controversial and fascinating science of chemical and synthetic additives in processed food—from Twinkies and McNuggets to organic protein bars and healthy shakes.

What’s really in your food?

We’ve all read the ingredients label on the back of a can, box, or bag from the grocery store. But what do all those mysterious-sounding chemicals and additives actually do?

Focusing on 75 of the most common food additives and 25 ordinary food products that contain them, acclaimed photographer Dwight Eschliman and science writer Steve Ettlinger demystify the contents of processed food. Together they reveal what each additive looks like, where it comes from, and how and why it is used.

Essential for everyone who is concerned about the wholesomeness of their diet or merely curious about “polysorbate 60” or “tertiary butylhydroquinone,” Ingredients is a visually and scientifically stunning journey from ketchup to Cool Whip.

You’ll be surprised at what you find.

The 10 Pounds Off Gluten-Free Diet: The Easy Way to Drop Inches in Just 28 Days [EPUB]

The 10 Pounds Off Gluten-Free Diet: The Easy Way to Drop Inches in Just 28 Days [EPUB]
The 10 Pounds Off Gluten-Free Diet: The Easy Way to Drop Inches in Just 28 Days by John Hastings
2015 | EPUB | 34.17MB

Considering a gluten-free diet? Here's a guide that covers it all, combining a weight loss plan from trusted health experts with delicious recipes from COOKING LIGHT.

Simple, effective, and user-friendly, The 10 Pounds Off Gluten-Free Diet is packed with valuable information and unique features, including:

  • A 28-day meal plan to help you lose a pound a week
  • 100+ gluten-free recipes approved by COOKING LIGHT
  • A customizable fitness plan
  • A stay-on-track journal
  • Handy shopping lists for a gluten-free kitchen
  • Bonus tips, easy-to-read charts, and more

Reviewed by medical doctors and registered dieticians, this proven approach to going gluten-free guarantees you'll meet your weight loss goals, one pound at a time.

The 10 Pounds Off Paleo Diet: The Easy Way to Drop Inches in Just 28 Days [EPUB]

The 10 Pounds Off Paleo Diet: The Easy Way to Drop Inches in Just 28 Days [EPUB]
The 10 Pounds Off Paleo Diet: The Easy Way to Drop Inches in Just 28 Days by John Hastings
2015 | EPUB | 34.65MB

Paleo is the hottest diet trend right now, but for many people, the idea of giving up carbs, gluten and dairy is so overwhelming it's hard to know where to start. The revolutionary 10 Pounds Off: The Paleo Diet makes it easy to go Paleo step by step, and is geared to beginners who are looking for a simple, effective way to lose weight.

Combining guidance from trusted health experts with delicious, guaranteed-to-work recipes from Cooking Light, the 10 Pounds Off: The Paleo Diet offers a foolproof path to healthy weight loss.

The book includes an easy to follow 28-day meal plan to help you lose a pound a week; more than 100 diet-specific Cooking Light-approved recipes; detailed shopping lists; a do-anywhere fitness plan; stay-on-track journal; and hundreds of informative tips, charts and boxes presented in a fun, visually exciting package that will make losing weight easier and more fun than you ever thought possible. Plus, the information is reviewed by an independent expert advisory board to offer a scientifically sound approach and guarantee your weight loss is healthful and sustainable. Do the Diet with a friend or try it solo-the 10 Pounds Off Diet series will help you achieve your weight loss goals, one pound at a time.