Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City [Audiobook]

Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City [Audiobook]
Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City [Audiobook] by Greg Grandin, read by Jonathan Davis
2010 | MP3 VBR V8 | 15 hrs 30 mins | 308.1MB

In 1927, Henry Ford, the richest man in the world, bought a tract of land twice the size of Delaware in the Brazilian Amazon. His intention was to grow rubber, but the project rapidly evolved into a more ambitious bid to export America itself. Fordlandia, as the settlement was called, soon became the site of an epic clash. On one side was the lean, austere car magnate; on the other, the Amazon, the most complex ecological system on the planet. Indigenous workers rejected Ford's midwestern Puritanism, turning the place into a ribald tropical boomtown. And his efforts to apply a system of regimented mass production to the Amazon's diversity resulted in a rash environmental assault that foreshadowed many of the threats laying waste to the rain forest today.

More than a parable of one man's arrogant attempt to force his will on the natural world, Greg Grandin's Fordlandia is "a quintessentially American fable". (Time).

The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World [Audiobook]

The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World [Audiobook]
The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World [Audiobook] by Greg Grandin, read by Luis Moreno
2014 | M4B@64 kbps + AZW3 | 11 hrs 27 mins | 315.46MB

From the acclaimed author of Fordlandia, the story of a remarkable slave rebellion that illuminates America' s struggle with slavery and freedom during the Age of Revolution and beyond

One morning in 1805, off a remote island in the South Pacific, Captain Amasa Delano, a New England seal hunter, climbed aboard a distressed Spanish ship carrying scores of West Africans he thought were slaves. They weren' t. Having earlier seized control of the vessel and slaughtered most of the crew, they were staging an elaborate ruse, acting as if they were humble servants. When Delano, an idealistic, anti-slavery republican, finally realized the deception, he responded with explosive violence. Drawing on research on four continents, The Empire of Necessity explores the multiple forces that culminated in this extraordinary event - an event that already inspired Herman Melville' s masterpiece Benito Cereno. Now historian Greg Grandin, with the gripping storytelling that was praised in Fordlandia, uses the dramatic happenings of that day to map a new transnational history of slavery in the Americas, capturing the clash of peoples, economies, and faiths that was the New World in the early 1800s.

Kissinger's Shadow: The Long Reach of America's Most Controversial Statesman [Audiobook]

Kissinger's Shadow: The Long Reach of America's Most Controversial Statesman [Audiobook]
Kissinger's Shadow: The Long Reach of America's Most Controversial Statesman [Audiobook] by Greg Grandin, read by Brian O'Neill
2015 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 7 hrs 34 mins | 204.7MB

A new account of America's most controversial diplomat that moves beyond praise or condemnation to reveal Kissinger as the architect of America's current imperial stance. In his fascinating new book, acclaimed historian Greg Grandin argues that to understand the crisis of contemporary America - its never-ending wars abroad and political polarization at home - we have to understand Henry Kissinger.

Examining Kissinger's own writings as well as a wealth of newly declassified documents, Grandin reveals how Richard Nixon's top foreign policy advisor, even as he was presiding over defeat in Vietnam and a disastrous, secret, and illegal war in Cambodia, was helping to revive a militarized version of American exceptionalism centered on an imperial presidency. Believing that reality could be bent to his will, insisting that intuition is more important in determining policy than hard facts, and vowing that past mistakes should never hinder future bold action, Kissinger anticipated, even enabled the ascendance of the neoconservative idealists who took America into crippling wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Going beyond accounts focusing on either Kissinger's crimes or accomplishments, Grandin offers a compelling new interpretation of the diplomat's continuing influence on how the United States views its role in the world.