Dancing with the Devil in the City of God [EPUB]

Dancing with the Devil in the City of God [EPUB]
Dancing with the Devil in the City of God: Rio de Janeiro on the Brink by Juliana Barbassa
2015 | EPUB | 25.33MB

In the tradition of Detroit: An American Autopsy and Maximum City comes a deeply reported and beautifully written biography of the seductive and chaotic city of Rio de Janeiro from prizewinning journalist and Brazilian native Juliana Barbassa.

Juliana Barbassa moved a great deal throughout her life, but Rio was always home. After twenty-one years abroad, she returned to find the city that once ravaged by inflation, drug wars, corrupt leaders, and dying neighborhoods was now on the precipice of a major change.

Rio has always aspired to the pantheon of global capitals, and under the spotlight of the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games it seems that its moment has come. But in order to prepare itself for the world stage, Rio must vanquish the entrenched problems that Barbassa recalls from her childhood. Turning this beautiful but deeply flawed place into a predictable, pristine showcase of the best that Brazil has to offer in just a few years is a tall order—and with the whole world watching, the stakes couldn’t be higher.

With a cast of larger-than-life characters who are driving this fast-moving juggernaut or who risk getting caught in its gears, this kaleidoscopic portrait of Rio introduces the reader to the people who make up this city of extremes, revealing their aspirations and their grit, their violence, their hungers and their splendor, and shedding light on the future of this city they are building together.

Dancing with the Devil in the City of God is an insider perspective into a city on the brink from a native daughter whose life, hopes, and fortunes are entwined with those of the city she portrays.

Kingmakers: The Invention of the Modern Middle East [EPUB]

Kingmakers: The Invention of the Modern Middle East [EPUB]
Kingmakers: The Invention of the Modern Middle East by Shareen Blair Brysac, Karl E Meyer
2009 | EPUB | 3.48MB

A brilliant narrative history tracing today's troubles back to grandiose imperial overreach of Great Britain and the United States.

Kingmakers is the story of how the modern Middle East came to be, told through the lives of the Britons and Americans who shaped it. Some are famous (Lawrence of Arabia and Gertrude Bell); others infamous (Harry St. John Philby, father of Kim); some forgotten (Sir Mark Sykes, Israel's godfather, and A. T. Wilson, the territorial creator of Iraq); some controversial (the CIA's Miles Copeland and the Pentagon's Paul Wolfowitz). All helped enthrone rulers in a region whose very name is an Anglo-American invention. As a bonus, we meet the British Empire's power couple, Lord and Lady Lugard (Flora Shaw): she named Nigeria, he ruled it; she used the power of the Times of London to attempt a regime change in the gold-rich Transvaal. The narrative is character-driven, and the aim is to restore to life the colorful figures who for good or ill gave us the Middle East in which Americans are enmeshed today.

Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time [EPUB]

Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time [EPUB]
Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time by Ira Katznelson
2013 | EPUB | 8.74MB

“A powerful argument, swept along by Katznelson’s robust prose and the imposing scholarship that lies behind it.”—Kevin Boyle, New York Times Book Review

A work that “deeply reconceptualizes the New Deal and raises countless provocative questions” (David Kennedy), Fear Itself changes the ground rules for our understanding of this pivotal era in American history. Ira Katznelson examines the New Deal through the lens of a pervasive, almost existential fear that gripped a world defined by the collapse of capitalism and the rise of competing dictatorships, as well as a fear created by the ruinous racial divisions in American society. Katznelson argues that American democracy was both saved and distorted by a Faustian collaboration that guarded racial segregation as it built a new national state to manage capitalism and assert global power. Fear Itself charts the creation of the modern American state and “how a belief in the common good gave way to a central government dominated by interest-group politics and obsessed with national security” (Louis Menand, The New Yorker).

City of Ambition: FDR, LaGuardia, and the Making of Modern New York [EPUB]

City of Ambition: FDR, LaGuardia, and the Making of Modern New York [EPUB]
City of Ambition: FDR, LaGuardia, and the Making of Modern New York by Mason B Williams
2013 | EPUB | 4.87MB

“Fascinating. . . . Williams tells the story of La Guardia and Roosevelt with insight and elegance.”―Edward Glaeser, New York Times Book Review

City of Ambition is a brilliant history of the New Deal and its role in the making of modern New York City. The story of a remarkable collaboration between Franklin Roosevelt and Fiorello La Guardia, this is a case study in creative political leadership in the midst of a devastating depression. Roosevelt and La Guardia were an odd couple: patrician president and immigrant mayor, fireside chat and tabloid cartoon, pragmatic Democrat and reform Republican. But together, as leaders of America’s two largest governments in the depths of the Great Depression, they fashioned a route to recovery for the nation and the master plan for a great city.

Roosevelt and his “Brain Trust”―shrewd, energetic advisors such as Harold Ickes and Harry Hopkins―sought to fight the Depression by channeling federal resources through America’s cities and counties. La Guardia had replaced Tammany Hall cronies with policy experts, such as the imperious Robert Moses, who were committed to a strong public sector. The two leaders worked closely together. La Guardia had a direct line of communication with FDR and his staff, often visiting Washington carrying piles of blueprints. Roosevelt relied on the mayor as his link to the nation’s cities and their needs. The combination was potent. La Guardia’s Gotham became a laboratory for New Deal reform. Roosevelt’s New Deal transformed city initiatives into major programs such as the Works Progress Administration, which changed the physical face of the United States. Together they built parks, bridges, and schools; put the unemployed to work; and strengthened the Progressive vision of government as serving the public purpose.

Today everyone knows the FDR Drive as a main route to La Guardia Airport. The intersection of steel and concrete speaks to a pair of dynamic leaders whose collaboration lifted a city and a nation. Here is their story.

Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression [EPUB]

Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression [EPUB]
Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression by Morris Dickstein
2009 | EPUB | 1.8MB

Finalist for the 2009 National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism: from Agee to Astaire, Steinbeck to Ellington, the creative energies of the Depression against a backdrop of poverty and economic disaster.

Only yesterday the Great Depression seemed like a bad memory, receding into the hazy distance with little relevance to our own flush times. Economists assured us that the calamities that befell our grandparents could not happen again, yet the recent economic meltdown has once again riveted the world’s attention on the 1930s.

Now, in this timely and long-awaited cultural history, Morris Dickstein, whom Norman Mailer called “one of our best and most distinguished critics of American literature,” explores the anxiety and hope, the despair and surprising optimism of a traumatized nation. Dickstein’s fascination springs from his own childhood, from a father who feared a pink slip every Friday and from his own love of the more exuberant side of the era: zany screwball comedies, witty musicals, and the lubricious choreography of Busby Berkeley. Whether analyzing the influence of film, design, literature, theater, or music, Dickstein lyrically demonstrates how the arts were then so integral to the fabric of American society.

While any lover of American literature knows Fitzgerald and Steinbeck, Dickstein also reclaims the lives of other novelists whose work offers enduring insights. Nathanael West saw Los Angeles as a vast dream dump, a Sargasso Sea of tawdry longing that exposed the pinched and disappointed lives of ordinary people, while Erskine Caldwell, his books Tobacco Road and God’s Little Acre festooned with lurid covers, provided the most graphic portrayal of rural destitution in the 1930s. Dickstein also immerses us in the visions of Zora Neale Hurston and Henry Roth, only later recognized for their literary masterpieces.

Just as Dickstein radically transforms our understanding of Depression literature, he explodes the prevailing myths that 1930s musicals and movies were merely escapist. Whether describing the undertone of sadness that lurks just below the surface of Cole Porter’s bubbly world or stressing the darker side of Capra’s wildly popular films, he shows how they delivered a catharsis of pain and an evangel of hope. Dickstein suggests that the tragic and comic worlds of Broadway and Hollywood preserved a radiance and energy that became a bastion against social suffering. Dancing in the Dark describes how FDR’s administration recognized the critical role that the arts could play in enabling “the helpless to become hopeful, the victims to become agents.” Along with the WPA, the photography unit of the FSA represented a historic partnership between government and art, and the photographers, among them Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange, created the defining look of the period.

The symbolic end to this cultural flowering came finally with the New York World’s Fair of 1939–40, a collective event that presented a vision of the future as a utopia of streamlined modernity and, at long last, consumer abundance. Retrieving the stories of an entire generation of performers and writers, Dancing in the Dark shows how a rich, panoramic culture both exposed and helped alleviate the national trauma. This luminous work is a monumental study of one of America’s most remarkable artistic periods.

Plato's Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts [EPUB]

Plato's Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts [EPUB]
Plato's Animals: Gadflies, Horses, Swans, and Other Philosophical Beasts edited by Michael Naas, Jeremy Bell
2015 | EPUB + MOBI | 1.65/1.92MB

Plato's Animals examines the crucial role played by animal images, metaphors, allusions, and analogies in Plato's Dialogues. These fourteen lively essays demonstrate that the gadflies, snakes, stingrays, swans, dogs, horses, and other animals that populate Plato's work are not just rhetorical embellishments. Animals are central to Plato's understanding of the hierarchy between animals, humans, and gods and are crucial to his ideas about education, sexuality, politics, aesthetics, the afterlife, the nature of the soul, and philosophy itself. The volume includes a comprehensive annotated index to Plato’s bestiary in both Greek and English.

Plato's Cratylus: The Comedy of Language [EPUB]

Plato's Cratylus: The Comedy of Language [EPUB]
Plato's Cratylus: The Comedy of Language by S Montgomery Ewegen
2013 | EPUB + PDF | 0.66/1.62MB

Plato’s dialogue Cratylus focuses on being and human dependence on words, or the essential truths about the human condition. Arguing that comedy is an essential part of Plato's concept of language, S. Montgomery Ewegen asserts that understanding the comedic is key to an understanding of Plato's deeper philosophical intentions. Ewegen shows how Plato’s view of language is bound to comedy through words and how, for Plato, philosophy has much in common with playfulness and the ridiculous. By tying words, language, and our often uneasy relationship with them to comedy, Ewegen frames a new reading of this notable Platonic dialogue.

How the West Came to Rule: The Geopolitical Origins of Capitalism [EPUB]

How the West Came to Rule: The Geopolitical Origins of Capitalism [EPUB]
How the West Came to Rule: The Geopolitical Origins of Capitalism by Alexander Anievas, Kerem Nisancioglu
2015 | EPUB | 1.45MB

Mainstream historical accounts of the development of capitalism describe a process which is fundamentally European - a system that was born in the mills and factories of England or under the guillotines of the French Revolution. In this groundbreaking book, a very different story is told.

How the West Came to Rule offers a unique interdisciplinary and international historical account of the origins of capitalism. It argues that contrary to the dominant wisdom, capitalism’s origins should not be understood as a development confined to the geographically and culturally sealed borders of Europe, but the outcome of a wider array of global processes in which non-European societies played a decisive role.

Through an outline of the uneven histories of Mongolian expansion, New World discoveries, Ottoman-Habsburg rivalry, the development of the Asian colonies and bourgeois revolutions, Alexander Anievas and Kerem Nisancioglu provide an account of how these diverse events and processes came together to produce capitalism.

The House That Trane Built [EPUB]

The House That Trane Built [EPUB]
The House That Trane Built: The Story of Impulse Records by Ashley Kahn
2007 | EPUB | 6.85MB

The dynamic fifteen-year saga of the enduringly popular jazz record label guided by legendary saxophonist John Coltrane.

Following the path of its star musician John Coltrane, Impulse Records cut a creative swath through the 1960s and 1970s with the politically charged avant-garde jazz that defined the label's musical and spiritual identity. The House That Trane Built tells the story of the label, balancing tales of individual passion, artistic vision, and commercial motivation. Weaving together research, dynamic album covers, session photographs, and nearly one hundred interviews with executives, journalists, producers, and musicians from Ray Charles and Alice Coltrane to Quincy Jones, Pharoah Sanders, McCoy Tyner, and others--this is the riveting tale of an era-shaping jazz label in the age of rock. The thirty-eight Album Profiles--a veritable book within a book--offer a consumer's guide to the best and most timeless titles on Impulse.

Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits [EPUB]

Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits [EPUB]
Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits by Linda Gordon
2010 | EPUB | 24.7MB

Winner of the 2010 Bancroft Prize and finalist for the 2009 Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Biography: The definitive biography of a heroic chronicler of America's Depression and one of the twentieth century's greatest photographers.

We all know Dorothea Lange's iconic photos―the Migrant Mother holding her child, the shoeless children of the Dust Bowl―but now renowned American historian Linda Gordon brings them to three-dimensional life in this groundbreaking exploration of Lange's transformation into a documentarist. Using Lange's life to anchor a moving social history of twentieth-century America, Gordon masterfully re-creates bohemian San Francisco, the Depression, and the Japanese-American internment camps. Accompanied by more than one hundred images―many of them previously unseen and some formerly suppressed―Gordon has written a sparkling, fast-moving story that testifies to her status as one of the most gifted historians of our time. Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; a New York Times Notable Book; New Yorker's A Year's Reading; and San Francisco Chronicle Best Book.

Eva Braun: Life with Hitler [Audiobook]

Eva Braun: Life with Hitler [Audiobook]
Eva Braun: Life with Hitler [Audiobook] by Heike B Gortemaker, read by Suzanne Toren
2011 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB + MOBI | 11 hrs 29 mins | 323.85MB

'I want to be a beautiful corpse, I will take poison' Eva Braun, 1945

Eva Braun and Adolf Hitler were together for fourteen years, a relationship that ended only with their marriage and double suicide in Berlin. Braun was obsessed with sport, fashion, photography and films, and seems to have had no real interest in politics. She and Hitler were unmarried and they had no children. And so, at the heart of the Nazi regime there was an odd paradox: the leader of a ferocious dictatorship, himself obsessed with imposing an idea of the 'German family' on an entire nation, who chose to spend much of his adult life with a woman 23 years younger than himself in a way that was unideological and bohemian.

So who was Eva Braun? Heike Görtemaker's highly praised new book is the first to take Braun's role in the Nazi hierarchy seriously. It uses her to throw fascinating light on a regime that prided itself on its harsh, coherent and unsentimental ideology, but which was in practice a chaos of competing individuals fighting for space around the overwhelmingly dominant figure of Hitler. Braun had a special place 'at court'. She was both marginal and exceptional: a more powerful figure than 'the First Ladies of the Third Reich' such as Magda Goebbels and Margarete Speer, but someone who almost never chose to use that power.

Braun's life tells us a huge amount about a particular, catastrophic era in German history, both in her role as Hitler's companion and as the hostess at Nazi social events at the Berghof. Heike Görtemaker's book allows Braun to step out as much as possible from the shadows and fully inhabit her strange role at the heart of a terrible regime.

Loneliness: Human Nature and the Need for Social Connection [EPUB]

Loneliness: Human Nature and the Need for Social Connection [EPUB]
Loneliness: Human Nature and the Need for Social Connection by John T Cacioppo, William Patrick
2008 | EPUB | 0.79MB

A pioneering neuroscientist reveals the reasons for loneliness and what to do about it.

John T. Cacioppo’s groundbreaking research topples one of the pillars of modern medicine and psychology: the focus on the individual as the unit of inquiry. By employing brain scans, monitoring blood pressure, and analyzing immune function, he demonstrates the overpowering influence of social context—a factor so strong that it can alter DNA replication. He defines an unrecognized syndrome—chronic loneliness—brings it out of the shadow of its cousin depression, and shows how this subjective sense of social isolation uniquely disrupts our perceptions, behavior, and physiology, becoming a trap that not only reinforces isolation but can also lead to early death. He gives the lie to the Hobbesian view of human nature as a “war of all against all,” and he shows how social cooperation is, in fact, humanity’s defining characteristic. Most important, he shows how we can break the trap of isolation for our benefit both as individuals and as a society.

Quantum Creativity: Think Quantum, Be Creative [EPUB]

Quantum Creativity: Think Quantum, Be Creative [EPUB]
Quantum Creativity: Think Quantum, Be Creative by Amit Goswami
2014 | EPUB | 3.23MB

In this mind-expanding work, physicist Amit Goswami, Ph.D., explores the world of human creativity—the ultimate source of joy and fulfillment—through the lens of quantum physics, and offers up a unique way to nurture and enhance your own creativity.

According to quantum physics, reality occurs on two levels: possibility and actuality. Goswami uses this same duality to explore what he calls "quantum thinking," which focuses on two levels of thinking—the conscious mind of actuality and the unconscious mind of possibility. He then poses questions that probe the wellspring of creation that exists in each of us. What is creativity? Can anyone be creative? What kinds of creativity are there? And through this inquiry, he lays out a guidebook for understanding the power of the mind to access creativity in a whole new way.

Combining the art of creativity with the objectivity of science, Quantum Creativity uses empirical data to support this new method of thinking and outlines how to harness our innate abilities in order to live more creatively. In short, Goswami teaches you how to think quantum to be creative.

The Deeper Genome [EPUB]

The Deeper Genome [EPUB]
The Deeper Genome: Why There is More to the Human Genome Than Meets the Eye by John Parrington
2015 | EPUB | 1.68MB
  • Gives an up-to-date account of our understanding of the human genome in over a decade since the completion of the Human Genome Project
  • Reveals the emerging picture of a genome far more complex than originally thought
  • Discusses the latest research, including much debated findings of the international ENCODE project
  • Reassesses what we are learning about the uniqueness of humans, and the role of genes in disease

Over a decade ago, as the Human Genome Project completed its mapping of the entire human genome, hopes ran high that we would rapidly be able to use our knowledge of human genes to tackle many inherited diseases, and understand what makes us unique among animals. But things didn't turn out that way. For a start, we turned out to have far fewer genes than originally thought - just over 20,000, the same sort of number as a fruit fly or worm. What's more, the proportion of DNA consisting of genes coding for proteins was a mere 2%. So, was the rest of the genome accumulated 'junk'?

Things have changed since those early heady days of the Human Genome Project. But the emerging picture is if anything far more exciting. In this book, John Parrington explains the key features that are coming to light - some, such as the results of the international ENCODE programme, still much debated and controversial in their scope. He gives an outline of the deeper genome, involving layers of regulatory elements controlling and coordinating the switching on and off of genes; the impact of its 3D geometry; the discovery of a variety of new RNAs playing critical roles; the epigenetic changes influenced by the environment and life experiences that can make identical twins different and be passed on to the next generation; and the clues coming out of comparisons with the genomes of Neanderthals as well as that of chimps about the development of our species. We are learning more about ourselves, and about the genetic aspects of many diseases. But in its complexity, flexibility, and ability to respond to environmental cues, the human genome is proving to be far more subtle than we ever imagined.

Readership: Popular science readers and students and scientists in biology, genetics, medicine, and neuroscience.

Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void [EPUB]

Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void [EPUB]
Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach
2011 | EPUB | 0.85MB

The best-selling author of Stiff and Bonk explores the irresistibly strange universe of space travel and life without gravity.

Space is a world devoid of the things we need to live and thrive: air, gravity, hot showers, fresh produce, privacy, beer. Space exploration is in some ways an exploration of what it means to be human. How much can a person give up? How much weirdness can they take? What happens to you when you can’t walk for a year? have sex? smell flowers? What happens if you vomit in your helmet during a space walk? Is it possible for the human body to survive a bailout at 17,000 miles per hour? To answer these questions, space agencies set up all manner of quizzical and startlingly bizarre space simulations. As Mary Roach discovers, it’s possible to preview space without ever leaving Earth. From the space shuttle training toilet to a crash test of NASA’s new space capsule (cadaver filling in for astronaut), Roach takes us on a surreally entertaining trip into the science of life in space and space on Earth.

Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex [Audiobook]

Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex [Audiobook]
Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex [Audiobook] by Mary Roach, read by Sandra Burr
2008 | MP3@48 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 28 mins | 201.25MB

The best-selling author of Stiff turns her outrageous curiosity and infectious wit on the most alluring scientific subject of all: sex.

The study of sexual physiology—what happens, and why, and how to make it happen better—has been a paying career or a diverting sideline for scientists as far-ranging as Leonardo da Vinci and James Watson. The research has taken place behind the closed doors of laboratories, brothels, MRI centers, pig farms, sex-toy R&D labs, and Alfred Kinsey’s attic. Mary Roach, “the funniest science writer in the country” (Burkhard Bilger of The New Yorker), devoted the past two years to stepping behind those doors.

Can a person think herself to orgasm? Can a dead man get an erection? Is vaginal orgasm a myth? Why doesn’t Viagra help women—or, for that matter, pandas? In Bonk, Roach shows us how and why sexual arousal and orgasm, two of the most complex, delightful, and amazing scientific phenomena on earth, can be so hard to achieve and what science is doing to slowly make the bedroom a more satisfying place.

Art Making, Collections, and Obsessions [EPUB]

Art Making, Collections, and Obsessions [EPUB]
Art Making, Collections, and Obsessions: An Intimate Exploration of the Mixed-Media Work and Collections of 35 Artists by Lynne Perrella
2008 | EPUB | 14.06MB

This large format, full-color, inspirational book is about how artists use their collections to make artwork. The gallery-style format allows readers to see what artists collect, and the resulting spectacular artwork they make from it. The book features the collections and the artwork of thirty-five major mixed-media artists. The artwork includes journals, assemblages, altered books, as well as jewelry pieces, and detailed descriptions of the materials and techniques used, plus tips and insights into using unusual materials and collections.

The Forge of Vision [EPUB]

The Forge of Vision [EPUB]
The Forge of Vision: A Visual History of Modern Christianity by David Morgan
2015 | EPUB + MOBI | 28.86/307.35MB

Religions teach their adherents how to see and feel at the same time; learning to see is not a disembodied process but one hammered from the forge of human need, social relations, and material practice. David Morgan argues that the history of religions may therefore be studied through the lens of their salient visual themes.

The Forge of Vision tells the history of Christianity from the sixteenth century through the present by selecting the visual themes of faith that have profoundly influenced its development. After exploring how distinctive Catholic and Protestant visual cultures emerged in the early modern period, Morgan examines a variety of Christian visual practices, ranging from the imagination, visions of nationhood, the likeness of Jesus, the material life of words, and the role of modern art as a spiritual quest, to the importance of images for education, devotion, worship, and domestic life. An insightful, informed presentation of how Christianity has shaped and continues to shape the modern world, this work is a must-read for scholars and students across fields of religious studies, history, and art history.

Everyone Has the Right to My Opinion [EPUB]

Everyone Has the Right to My Opinion [EPUB]
Everyone Has the Right to My Opinion: Investor's Business Daily Pulitzer Prize-Winning Editorial Cartoonist by Michael Ramirez
2011 | EPUB | 53.37MB

An editorial cartoon is not just a funny picture, says two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Michael Ramirez. It is a powerful instrument of journalism, sometimes sharp and refined, its message cutting quickly to the point, and at other times, blunt and overpowering, seizing the readers' attention with its dark imagery.

In Everyone Has the Right to My Opinion, Michael Ramirez, the internationally known editorial cartoonist for Investor's Business Daily who has been making headlines and stirring up controversy since 1983, offers a comprehensive collection of his award-winning cartoons, accompanied by an introduction to the images highlighted throughout the book. Each cartoon shows that a picture is worth a thousand words and transforms the news of the day into eye-catching, provocative, and hilarious images that draw people into the democratic process.

In a world of textual information, Ramirez combines an encyclopedic knowledge of the news with a captivating drawing style to create consistently outstanding and highly incisive satirical cartoons. His commentary on everything from the economy and markets to politics and international affairs offers a unique perspective on today's issues, particularly during presidential election years. They take a humorously insightful look at the world around us, making readers laugh while informing them on the issues of our times.

Some of these cartoons may make you laugh. Some will make you cringe. But all of them will make you think. Throughout Everyone Has the Right to My Opinion, Ramirez's artistic skill, biting humor, and penetrating analysis shine through and shed light on what's really going on in our world today.