The Doctor’s Guide to Surviving When Modern Medicine Fails [EPUB]

The Doctor’s Guide to Surviving When Modern Medicine Fails [EPUB]
The Doctor’s Guide to Surviving When Modern Medicine Fails: The Ultimate Natural Medicine Guide to Preventing Disease and Living Longer by Scott A Johnson
2015 | EPUB | 1.31MB

Instead of running to the doctor every time you get sick, you can avoid the illness in the first place with the unique solutions offered in The Doctor's Guide to Surviving When Modern Medicine Fails. No matter your current state of health you are in, these easy-to-follow steps will help you elevate your health, prevent disease and live a longer life. The specific strategies outlined by Dr. Scott A. Johnson will promote an environment inhospitable to heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and more!

Discover how to eat better, get the most out of physical activity, employ proven dietary supplements as allies in your health, regularly cleanse your body of toxins and harmful chemicals, and balance your mental, spiritual, and emotional health.

The Doctor's Guide to Surviving When Modern Medicine Fails empowers individuals of all ages to simultaneously realize optimum health and reduce the risk of illness. Through Dr. Johnson's sensible approach and natural medicine practices, readers will discover how to make better choices for their own health and that of their families. Once these practices are established, they will be able to say "no doctor, no problem."

Sugar Crush [EPUB]

Sugar Crush [EPUB]
Sugar Crush: How to Reduce Inflammation, Reverse Nerve Damage, and Reclaim Good Health by Richard Jacoby, Raquel Baldelomar
2015 | EPUB | 1.05MB

What Grain Brain did for wheat, this book by a leading peripheral nerve surgeon now does for sugar, revealing how it causes crippling nerve damage throughout the body—in our feet, organs, and brain—why sugar and carbohydrates are harmful to the body's nerves, and how eliminating them can mitigate and even reverse the damage.

Sugar Crush exposes the shocking truth about how a diet high in sugar, processed carbohydrates, and wheat compresses and damages the peripheral nerves of the body, leading to pain, numbness, and tingling in the hands and feet, along with a host of related conditions, including migraines, gall bladder disease, and diabetes. If you suffer from ailments your doctors can’t seem to diagnose or help—mysterious rashes, unpredictable digestive problems, debilitating headaches, mood and energy swings, constant tiredness—nerve compression is the likely cause.

Over the years, Dr. Richard Jacoby has treated thousands of patients with peripheral neuropathy. Now, he shares his insights as well as the story of how he connected the dots to determine how sugar is the common denominator of many chronic diseases. In Sugar Crush, he offers a unique holistic approach to understanding the exacting toll sugar and carbs take on the body. Based on his clinical work, he breaks down his highly effective methods, showing how dietary changes reducing sugar and wheat, coinciding with an increase of good fats, can dramatically help regenerate nerves and rehabilitate their normal function.

Sugar Crush includes a quiz to assess your nerve damage, practical dietary advice, and the latest thinking on ways to prevent and reverse neuropathy. If you have diabetes, this essential guide will help you understand the dangers and give you the tools you need to make a difference beyond your doctor’s prescriptions. If you have the metabolic syndrome or prediabetes, or are just concerned about your health, it will help you reverse and prevent nerve damage.

Grain Brain [EPUB]

Grain Brain [EPUB]
Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar--Your Brain's Silent Killers by David Perlmutter, Kristin Loberg
2014 | EPUB | 1.23MB

Renowned neurologist Dr David Perlmutter, blows the lid off a topic that's been buried in medical literature for far too long: gluten and carbs are destroying your brain. And not just unhealthy carbs, but even healthy ones like whole grains can cause dementia, ADHD, anxiety, chronic headaches, depression, and much more.

Dr Perlmutter explains what happens when the brain encounters common ingredients in your daily bread and fruit bowls, why your brain thrives on fat and cholesterol, and how you can spur the growth of new brain cells at any age. He offers an in-depth look at how we can take control of our 'smart genes' through specific dietary choices and lifestyle habits, demonstrating how to remedy our most feared maladies without drugs.

With a revolutionary 30-day plan, GRAIN BRAIN teaches us how we can reprogram our genetic destiny for the better.

Basic Illustrated Map and Compass [EPUB]

Basic Illustrated Map and Compass [EPUB]
Basic Illustrated Map and Compass by Cliff Jacobson
2008 | EPUB | 5.97MB

Richly illustrated and information-packed tools for the novice or handy reference for the veteran, BASIC ILLUSTRATED books distill years of knowledge into affordable and visual guides. Whether you're planning a trip or thumbing for facts in the field, the BASIC ILLUSTRATED series shows you what you need to know.

Discover how to:

  • Choose and use the right type of compass
  • Use a map and compass in concert with a GPS receiver
  • Read and understand contour lines and other map features
  • Plot a course and find your way through the wilderness
  • Use the stars to navigate rivers, streams, and trails at night
  • Find and order the maps you need

100 Skills You'll Need for the End of the World (as We Know It) [EPUB]

100 Skills You'll Need for the End of the World (as We Know It) [EPUB]
100 Skills You'll Need for the End of the World (as We Know It) by Ana Maria Spagna
2015 | EPUB | 22.09MB

What skills will you need after a global catastrophe? Whether it’s the end of oil, an environmental disaster, or something entirely unforeseen, Ana Maria Spagna outlines 100 skills you’ll find indispensable for life after the apocalypse. Once the dust has settled, you’ll need to know how to barter, perform basic first aid, preserve food, cut your own hair, clean a chimney, navigate by the stars, stitch a wound, darn socks, and sharpen blades. You’ll also want to build a stable and safe community, so you’ll need to master the arts of conversation, child raising, listening, music making, and storytelling. This fascinating and entertaining book, full of quirky illustrations by artist Brian Cronin, will provoke surprise, debate, and laughter while it provides a road map to greater self-reliance and joy, whatever the future brings.

Hatha Yoga: The Hidden Language, Symbols, Secrets & Metaphors [EPUB]

Hatha Yoga: The Hidden Language, Symbols, Secrets & Metaphors [EPUB]
Hatha Yoga: The Hidden Language, Symbols, Secrets & Metaphors by Swami Sivananda Radha
2006 | EPUB | 2.82MB

Long considered essential reading for Hatha Yoga students and teachers, the revised 20th anniversary edition of Hatha Yoga: The Hidden Language presents 22 classical Hatha asanas with in-depth investigations into their symbolic natures. Swami Sivananda Radha explores the mythological meaning of each posture as she encourages the hatha yogi to stretch beyond the physical. Building on the classical foundations of an ancient tradition, Swami Radha brilliantly synthesizes the ancient wisdom of yoga with an understanding of psychological and spiritual facets of contemporary life. With this approach, one can penetrate the mystical messages of the asanas so that the body is truly understood as a spiritual tool. It was twenty years ago when Swami Radha first introduced the transformational Hidden Language method to students interested in going deeper with their practice.

Now, with expanded instructions on how to incorporate the Hidden Language method into a personal practice, beautiful photographs by Derek Shapton and an introduction by ascent columnist, Swami Lalitananda, the 20th anniversary edition of HLHY is essential reading for the serious student of yoga.

American Tempest [Audiobook]

American Tempest [Audiobook]
American Tempest: How the Boston Tea Party Sparked a Revolution [Audiobook] by Harlow Giles Unger, read by William Hughes
2011 | M4A@256 kbps | 8 hrs 11 mins | 913.94MB

On Thursday, December 16, 1773, an estimated seven dozen men, many amateurishly disguised as Indians - then a symbol of freedom - dumped about £10,000 worth of tea in the harbor. Whatever their motives at the time, they unleashed a social, political, and economic firestorm that would culminate in the Declaration of Independence two and a half years later.

The Boston Tea Party provoked a reign of terror in Boston and other American cities, with Americans inflicting unimaginable barbarities on each other. Tea parties erupted in American cities up and down the colonies. The turmoil stripped tens of thousands of Americans of their dignity, their homes, their properties, and their birthrights - in the name of liberty and independence. Nearly 100,000 Americans left the land of their forefathers forever in what was history's largest exodus of Americans from America. Nonetheless, John Adams called the Boston Tea Party nothing short of "magnificent." And he went on to say that the "destruction of tea is so bold, so daring, so firm...it must have important consequences."

Ironically, few if any Americans today - even those who call themselves Tea Party Patriots - would be able to name even one of the estimated eighty participants in the original Boston Tea Party. Nor are many Americans aware of the "important consequences" of the Tea Party. The acute shortage of tea that followed the Tea Party, of course, helped transform Americans into coffee drinkers, but its effects went far beyond culinary tastes.

The Tea Party would affect so many American minds, hearts, and souls that it helped spawn a new, independent nation whose citizens would govern themselves.

Meaning of Life [TTC Video]

Meaning of Life [TTC Video]
Meaning of Life: Perspectives from the World's Great Intellectual Traditions [TTC Video] by Professor Jay L Garfield
Course No 4320 | AVI, XviD, 904 kbps, 640x480 | MP3, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 36x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 7.81GB

What is the meaning of life? It's a question every thoughtful person has pondered at one time or another. Indeed, it may be the biggest question of all. Most of us have asked ourselves this question at some time, or posed it to somebody we respect. It is at once a profound and abstract question, and a deeply personal one. We want to understand the world in which we live, but we also want to understand how to make our own lives as meaningful as possible; to know not only why we're living, but that we're doing it with intention, purpose, and ethical commitment.

But how, exactly, do we find that meaning, and develop that commitment? How can we grasp why we are here? Or how we should proceed? And to whom, exactly, are we supposed to listen as we shape the path we will walk?

The Meaning of Life: Perspectives from the World's Great Intellectual Traditions is an invigorating way to begin or to continue your pursuit of these questions, with no previous background in philosophical or religious thought required. Its 36 lectures offer a rigorous and wide-ranging exploration of what various spiritual, religious, and philosophical traditions from both the East and the West have contributed to this profound line of questioning.

Guided by Professor Jay L. Garfield of Smith College—as well as of the University of Massachusetts, Melbourne University in Australia, and the Central University of Tibetan Studies in India—you'll gain insights from a broad array of sources, including these:

  • Ancient Indian texts, including the Bhagavad-Gita
  • Foundational Chinese texts such as the Daodejing and the Chuang Tzu
  • Classical Western texts such as Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics and Marcus Aurelius's Meditations
  • Modern philosophers such as David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Leo Tolstoy
  • The unique perspectives offered by Native Americans; in this case, the Lakota Sioux medicine man and writer, John Lame Deer
  • More recent and contemporary philosophers, such as Mohandas Gandhi and the Dalai Lama

Enjoy a Journey Rich in Knowledge and Perspective

The ability to ponder your own relationship with the universe and with others is perhaps one of the greatest benefits of being human. Even if you do not find a final answer to the question this course poses, each answer you consider cannot help but add depth and nuance to your own contemplation of how to live.

In considering the range of approaches to this question developed over the course of human intellectual history, you'll increase your own storehouse of wisdom, enabling you to shape a life that is as meaningful and satisfying as possible, heightening your appreciation of every moment.

The Meaning of Life is a course rich in wisdom, including the realization that although a single answer to the question may forever elude you, that elusiveness is no great tragedy. More important is the search itself, and the insights you'll gain as you realize that just as different traditions provide a vast diversity of answers, so, too, do they consistently return to recurring themes:

  • One's relationship to a larger context
  • The boundaries created by temporality and impermanence
  • The pursuit of a larger purpose, or even the goal of perfection
  • The value of spontaneity, even though the ideal of that characteristic differs from one tradition to another
  • The importance of freedom, whether from social norms and standards; religious, social, or political authority; external constraints; consumerism; or even philosophical ideas themselves
  • The commitment to live authentically
  • Find Common Ground with History's Most Profound Thinkers

For anyone who has spent time grappling with these ideas themselves, it is a comfort to see that even some of history's most profound thinkers have wrestled with these problems, engaging in a conversation thousands of years in length and rich in insight.

For example, while many of them agree on the importance of authenticity, their agreement marks not the end of the conversation, but its beginning.

  • Should that authenticity, as Kant and Mill believed, be epistemic, found in the hard work of serious reasoning over political, moral, and scientific issues so that we can propagate the answers we discover?
  • Should it be what we might call an aesthetic authenticity—a life lived truly in harmony with a beautifully visualized fundamental reality? Such a view attracted figures as varied as Nietzsche, the Zen writer Dogen, and Laozi, the possibly mythical figure credited with authorship of the Daodejing.
  • Or should it be instead a natural authenticity, so that you live your life as Lame Deer advocated, striving for harmony with the natural world in the face of a modern civilization whose every construct seems designed to make that impossible?

One of The Meaning of Life's great virtues is the ease with which Professor Garfield organizes and makes cohesive the vast range of perspectives. At every stage of the course, the relationship of each writer or tradition to all of the others is clear and logical, no matter how intricate or demanding a line of argument might be.

Dr. Garfield—teaching his material with extraordinary passion and thoroughness—shows great skill in unpacking the substance of each source, presenting it clearly and positioning it in its proper place within a philosophical conversation that has been going on for millennia.

And when an idea might otherwise present vexing complexities, he unveils an additional—and superbly useful—teaching skill. For Professor Garfield has the gift of analogy, enabling him to relate even the most ancient or subtle texts to your own life in ways that show their relevance to how you live today.

With The Meaning of Life, Professor Garfield has put together an intellectually gripping course that is every bit the equal of the monumental subject it sets out to explore.

Lectures:

  1. The Meaning of the Meaning of Life
  2. The Bhagavad-Gita — Choice and Daily Life
  3. The Bhagavad-Gita — Discipline and Duty
  4. The Bhagavad-Gita — Union and Purpose
  5. Aristotle on Life — The Big Picture
  6. Aristotle — The Highest Good
  7. Aristotle — The Happy Life
  8. Job's Predicament — Life Is So Unfair
  9. Job's Challenge — Who Are We?
  10. Stoicism — Rationality and Acceptance
  11. Human Finitude — The Epicurean Synthesis
  12. Confucius — Order in the Cosmos and in Life
  13. Daodejing — The Dao of Life and Spontaneity
  14. Daodejing — The Best Life Is a Simple Life
  15. Daodejing — Subtlety and Paradox
  16. Zhuangzi on Daoism — Impermanence and Harmony
  17. The Teachings of the Buddha
  18. Santideva — Mahayana Buddhism
  19. Santideva — Transforming the Mind
  20. Zen — The Moon in a Dewdrop and Impermanence
  21. Zen — Being-Time and Primordial Awakening
  22. Taking Stock of the Classical World
  23. Hume's Skepticism and the Place of God
  24. Hume's Careless and Compassionate Vision
  25. Kant — Immaturity and the Challenge to Know
  26. Mill's Call to Individuality and to Liberty
  27. Tolstoy — Is Everyday Life the Real Thing?
  28. Nietzsche — Twilight of the Idols
  29. Nietzsche — Achieving Authenticity
  30. Gandhi — Satyagraha and Holding Fast to Truth
  31. Gandhi — The Call to a Supernormal Life
  32. Lame Deer — Life Enfolded in Symbols
  33. Lame Deer — Our Place in a Symbolic World
  34. HH Dalai Lama XIV — A Modern Buddhist View
  35. HH Dalai Lama XIV — Discernment and Happiness
  36. 36. So, What Is the Meaning of Life?

America in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era [TTC Video]

America in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era [TTC Video]
America in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era [TTC Video] by Professor Edward T. O'Donnell
Course No 8535 | .M4V, AVC, 2000 kbps, 640x360 | English, AAC, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 10.86 GB

America stands at a dramatic crossroads:

  • Massive banks and corporations wield disturbing power.
  • The huge income gap between the 1% and the other 99% grows visibly wider.
  • Astounding new technologies are changing American lives.
  • Conflicts over U.S. military interventionism, the environment, and immigration dominate public debate.

Sound familiar? You might be surprised to know that these headlines were ripped, not from today’s newspaper, but from newspapers over 100 years ago. These and other issues that characterize the early 21st century were also the hallmarks of the transformative periods known as the Gilded Age (1865-1900) and the Progressive Era (1900-1920).

Welcome to one of the most colorful, tumultuous, raucous, and profoundly pivotal epochs in American history. Stretching from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to roughly 1920, this extraordinary time was not only an era of vast and sweeping change—it saw the birth of the United States as we and the world at large now know it.

Before the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, America was a developing nation, with a largely agrarian economy; sharp divisions between North, South, and West; and virtually no role in global affairs. Yet by 1900, within an astonishing 35 years, the U.S. had emerged as the world’s greatest industrial power.

During the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, the U.S. went from “leading by example” and maintaining an isolationist foreign policy to become a major participant in international events, showing itself as a nascent superpower in the Spanish-American War and World War I.

Numerous other events came together during these same periods to create the U.S. that we know now. In a time rife with staggering excess, social unrest, and strident calls for reform, these remarkable events characterized the Gilded Age and Progressive Era:

  • Industrialization directly gave rise to a huge American middle class.
  • New and voluminous waves of immigration added new material to the “melting pot” of U.S. society.
  • A mainly agrarian population became an urban one, witnessing the rise of huge cities.
  • The phenomenon of big business led to the formation of labor unions and the adoption of consumer protections.
  • Electricity, cars, and other technologies forever changed the landscape of American life.

To delve into the catalytic events of these times is to see, with crystal clarity, how the U.S. went from what we now might consider Third World status in the mid-19th century to become the major power it is today. Knowledge of these pivotal eras also provides insightful perspectives on conflicts that dominate our contemporary headlines—from fears surrounding immigration and income inequality to concern for the fate of the environment—and how they were meaningfully addressed in past times.

Now, in the 24 lectures of America in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Professor Edward T. O’Donnell of the College of the Holy Cross leads you in a sprawling, multifaceted journey through this uproarious epoch. In taking the measure of six dramatically innovative decades, you’ll investigate the economic, political, and social upheavals that marked these years, as well as the details of daily life and the critical cultural thinking of the times. In the process, you’ll meet robber barons, industrialists, socialites, crusading reformers, inventors, conservationists, women’s suffragists, civil rights activists, and passionate progressives, who together forged a new United States. These engrossing lectures provide a stunning and illuminating portrait of a nation-changing era.

A Republic Transforms

In Professor O’Donnell’s description, “The Gilded Age’s amazing innovation and wealth created the conditions—and mobilized the masses—for the Progressive Era’s social reforms.” Across the span of the lectures, you’ll witness this historical progression through subject matter such as:

  • The Industrial Age and the Rise of Big Business: Follow America’s epic industrial ascent in the 19th century, the emergence of vast corporations and trusts, the making of industrial magnates such as John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie, and the transformation of the nation into a consumer society.
  • Revolutionary Technologies and Social Culture: Grasp how steel, electrical power, mass transportation, and recorded sound radically changed American life. Learn about the conspicuous excesses of the new super rich, the lifestyles of the exploding middle class, and the phenomena of American music, spectator sports, and stage entertainment.
  • The Dark Side of Progress: Take account of the devastating social problems that followed advances in industry and technology: extreme income inequality and poverty, graft and political corruption, severe exploitation of industrial workers, rampant labor violence, and the ills of urban crime, squalor, and disease.
  • The Crusade for Rights: Observe how the clash of progress and poverty spurred far-reaching efforts to secure legal rights for the disenfranchised. Study historic activism for workers’ rights, women’s rights, children’s rights, and the rights of consumers, and uncover the early and often overlooked struggle for African–Americans’ civil rights.
  • The New American Woman: Track significant changes in the lives of American women, such as major increases in women in the workforce, new public roles for women, the dynamic presence of women in reform initiatives, and the remarkable story of the women’s suffrage movement.

The Many Faces of Reform: Study the astonishing spectrum of reform movements that defined the Progressive Era, encompassing:

  • the dramatic unfolding of labor organizing, labor/capital conflict, and reform;
  • urban reforms, from regulation of deplorable tenements to sanitation and social work;
  • historic political reforms, from the ballot initiative to the civil service system;
  • the “busting” of powerful trusts and banking conglomerates; and
  • the conservation of wilderness and the world’s first national parks.

A Fascinating Window on Momentous Times

In his teaching, Professor O’Donnell demonstrates an extraordinarily comprehensive and penetrating knowledge of the eras in question, together with a flair for bringing the human realities of the times alive through powerful storytelling. Among numerous impactful episodes, you’ll witness the monumental moment in 1880 when electric arc lighting first lit American streets, causing men to fall on their knees before what seemed to be “lightning brought down from the heavens.” You’ll relive the events of the heartrending Bread and Roses strike of 1912, the wealth-flaunting gaudiness of Mrs. Vanderbilt’s ball of 1883 (which cost six million dollars in today’s currency), and the storm of suffragist picketers who besieged the White House in 1917.

And you’ll encounter great personalities, whose vision and dynamism symbolized and transformed the temper of their times. In addition to luminaries such as Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, you’ll meet the likes of saloon-busting reformer Carrie Nation, African-American rights activist Ida B. Wells, muckraking journalist Lincoln Steffens, suffragist leader Elizabeth Cady Stanton, environmentalist John Muir, and Theodore Roosevelt, whose accomplishments in conservation and economic regulation made him one of the greatest reformers of the times.

In America in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, you’ll contemplate profound shifts in American society that marked what is arguably the most significant period of change in our history. These compelling lectures vividly reveal the thinking, the struggles, the conquests, and the triumphs that made the United States the global force it is today.

Lectures:

  1. 1865: "Bind Up the Nation's Wounds"
  2. The Reconstruction Revolution
  3. Buffalo Bill Cody and the Myth of the West
  4. Smokestack Nation: The Industrial Titans
  5. Andrew Carnegie: The Self-Made Ideal
  6. Big Business: Democracy for Sale?
  7. The New Immigrants: A New America
  8. Big Cities: The Underbelly Revealed
  9. Popular Culture: Jazz, Modern Art, Movies
  10. New Technology: Cars, Electricity, Records
  11. The 1892 Homestead Strike
  12. Morals and Manners: Middle-Class Society
  13. Mrs. Vanderbilt's Gala Ball
  14. Populist Revolt: The Grangers and Coxey
  15. Rough Riders and the Imperial Dream
  16. No More Corsets: The New Woman
  17. Trust-Busting in the Progressive Era
  18. The 1911 Triangle Fire and Reform
  19. Theodore Roosevelt, Conservationist
  20. Urban Reform: How the Other Half Lives
  21. The 17th Amendment: Democracy Restored
  22. Early Civil Rights: Washington or Du Bois?
  23. Over There: A World Safe for Democracy
  24. Upheaval and the End of an Era

Spring Chicken: Stay Young Forever (or Die Trying) [Audiobook]

Spring Chicken: Stay Young Forever (or Die Trying) [Audiobook]
Spring Chicken: Stay Young Forever (or Die Trying) [Audiobook] by Bill Gifford, read by Jeremy Arthur
2015 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 32 mins | 268.59MB

From acclaimed journalist Bill Gifford comes a roaring journey into the world of anti-aging science in search of answers to a universal obsession: what can be done about getting old?

SPRING CHICKEN is a full-throttle, high-energy ride through the latest research, popular mythology, and ancient wisdom on mankind's oldest obsession: How can we live longer? And better? In his funny, self-deprecating voice, veteran reporter Bill Gifford takes readers on a fascinating journey through the science of aging, from the obvious signs like wrinkles and baldness right down into the innermost workings of cells. We visit cutting-edge labs where scientists are working to "hack" the aging process, like purging "senescent" cells from mice to reverse the effects of aging. He'll reveal why some people live past 100 without even trying, what has happened with resveratrol, the "red wine pill" that made headlines a few years ago, how your fat tissue is trying to kill you, and how it's possible to unlock longevity-promoting pathways that are programmed into our very genes. Gifford separates the wheat from the chaff as he exposes hoaxes and scams foisted upon an aging society, and arms readers with the best possible advice on what to do, what not to do, and what life-changing treatments may be right around the corner.

An intoxicating mixture of deep reporting, fascinating science, and prescriptive takeaway, SPRING CHICKEN will reveal the extraordinary breakthroughs that may yet bring us eternal youth, while exposing dangerous deceptions that prey on the innocent and ignorant.

Earthquake Storms [Audiobook]

Earthquake Storms [Audiobook]
Earthquake Storms: The Fascinating History and Volatile Future of the San Andreas Fault [Audiobook] by John Dvorak, read by Malcolm Hillgartner
2014 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 8 hrs 49 mins | 250.51MB

It is a prominent geological feature that is almost impossible to see unless you know where to look. Hundreds of thousands of people drive across it every day. The San Andreas Fault is everywhere, and primed for a colossal quake. For decades, scientists have warned that such a sudden shifting of the Earth s crust is inevitable. In fact, it is a geologic necessity.

The San Andreas fault runs almost the entire length of California, from the redwood forest to the east edge of the Salton Sea. Along the way, it passes through two of the largest urban areas of the country San Francisco and Los Angeles. Dozens of major highways and interstates cross it. Scores of housing developments have been planted over it. The words San Andreas are so familiar today that they have become synonymous with earthquake.

Yet, few people understand the San Andreas or the network of subsidiary faults it has spawned. Some run through Hollywood, others through Beverly Hills and Santa Monica. The Hayward fault slices the football stadium at the University of California in half. Even among scientists, few appreciate that the San Andreas fault is a transient, evolving system that, as seen today, is younger than the Grand Canyon and key to our understanding of earthquakes worldwide."

The Woman Who Would Be King [Audiobook]

The Woman Who Would Be King [Audiobook]
The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise To Power In Ancient Egypt [Audiobook] by Kara Cooney, read by the Author
2014 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 10 hrs 26 mins | 293.8MB

An engrossing biography of the longest-reigning female pharaoh in Ancient Egypt and the story of her audacious rise to power in a man’s world.

Hatshepsut, the daughter of a general who took Egypt's throne without status as a king’s son and a mother with ties to the previous dynasty, was born into a privileged position of the royal household. Married to her brother, she was expected to bear the sons who would legitimize the reign of her father’s family. Her failure to produce a male heir was ultimately the twist of fate that paved the way for her inconceivable rule as a cross-dressing king. At just twenty, Hatshepsut ascended to the rank of king in an elaborate coronation ceremony that set the tone for her spectacular twenty-two year reign as co-regent with Thutmose III, the infant king whose mother Hatshepsut out-maneuvered for a seat on the throne. Hatshepsut was a master strategist, cloaking her political power plays with the veil of piety and sexual expression. Just as women today face obstacles from a society that equates authority with masculinity, Hatshepsut had to shrewdly operate the levers of a patriarchal system to emerge as Egypt's second female pharaoh.

Hatshepsut had successfully negotiated a path from the royal nursery to the very pinnacle of authority, and her reign saw one of Ancient Egypt’s most prolific building periods. Scholars have long speculated as to why her images were destroyed within a few decades of her death, all but erasing evidence of her rule. Constructing a rich narrative history using the artifacts that remain, noted Egyptologist Kara Cooney offers a remarkable interpretation of how Hatshepsut rapidly but methodically consolidated power—and why she fell from public favor just as quickly. The Woman Who Would Be King traces the unconventional life of an almost-forgotten pharaoh and explores our complicated reactions to women in power.

Darkwater: Voices from within the Veil [Audiobook]

Darkwater: Voices from within the Veil [Audiobook]
Darkwater: Voices from within the Veil [Audiobook] by W E B Du Bois, read by Bernard K Addison, Dion Graham, Lisa Reneé Pitts, Bahni Turpin, Mirron Willis
2014 | MP3@64 kbps | 9 hours | 261.19MB

W. E. B. Du Bois was a public intellectual, sociologist, and activist on behalf of the African American community. He profoundly shaped black political culture in the United States through his founding role in the NAACP, as well as internationally through the Pan-African movement. Du Bois's sociological and historical research on African-American communities and culture broke ground in many areas, including the history of the post-Civil War Reconstruction period. Du Bois was also a prolific author of novels, autobiographical accounts, innumerable editorials and journalistic pieces, and several works of history.

Considered a sequel to Du Bois's wildly popular The Souls of Black Folks, Darkwater revisits many of the same themes with a more militant edge, even revising previously published essays and poems to include in this newer volume. Published in 1920, Darkwater focuses on the political climate following World War I. In ten carefully crafted chapters, Du Bois explores the important issues of that period- labor, capital, politics, gender, education, and international relations-in tandem with an overarching theme of race. Blending lyrical autobiography with political thoughts and even poetry, Du Bois makes a powerful, forceful argument regarding race and the color line.

Stuff: Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things [Audiobook]

Stuff: Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things [Audiobook]
Stuff: Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things [Audiobook] by Randy O Frost, Gail Stekeete, read by Joe Caron
2010 | MP3@64 kbps | 9 hrs 8 mins | 262.0MB

What possesses someone to save every scrap of paper thats ever come into his home? What compulsions drive a woman like Irene, whose hoarding cost her her marriage? Or Ralph, whose imagined uses for castoff items like leaky old buckets almost lost him his house?

Randy Frost and Gail Steketee were the first to study hoarding when they began their work a decade ago; they expected to find a few sufferers but ended up treating hundreds of patients and fielding thousands of calls from the families of others. Now they explore the compulsion through a series of compelling case studies in the vein of Oliver Sacks.

With vivid portraits that show us the traits by which you can identify a hoarder - piles on sofas and beds that make the furniture useless, houses that can be navigated only by following small paths called goat trails, vast piles of paper that the hoarders churn but never discard, even collections of animals and garbage - Frost and Steketee illuminate the pull that possessions exert on all of us.

Whether we're savers, collectors, or compulsive cleaners, very few of us are in fact free of the impulses that drive hoarders to the extremes in which they live. For all of us with complicated relationships to our things, Stuff answers the question of what happens when our stuff starts to own us.

Affluenza [Audiobook]

Affluenza [Audiobook]
Affluenza [Audiobook] by Oliver James, read by the Author
2009 | MP3@64 kbps | 5 hrs 54 mins | 166.11MB

There is currently an epidemic of 'affluenza' throughout the world - an obsessive, envious, keeping-up-with-the-Joneses - that has resulted in huge increases in depression and anxiety among millions. Over a nine-month period, best-selling author Oliver James travelled around the world to try and find out why. He discovered how, despite very different cultures and levels of wealth, affluenza is spreading.

Cities he visited include Sydney, Singapore, Moscow, Copenhagen, New York, and Shanghai, and in each place he interviewed several groups of people in the hope of finding out not only why this is happening, but also how one can increase the strength of one's emotional immune system. He asks: why do so many more people want what they haven't got and want to be someone they're not, despite being richer and freer from traditional restraints?

And, in so doing, uncovers the answer to how to reconnect with what really matters and learn to value what you've already got. In other words, how to be successful and stay sane.

Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy Ring [EPUB]

Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy Ring [EPUB]
Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy Ring by Alexander Rose
2007 | EPUB | 5.93MB

Based on remarkable new research, acclaimed historian Alexander Rose brings to life the true story of the spy ring that helped America win the Revolutionary War. For the first time, Rose takes us beyond the battlefront and deep into the shadowy underworld of double agents and triple crosses, covert operations and code breaking, and unmasks the courageous, flawed men who inhabited this wilderness of mirrors—including the spymaster at the heart of it all.

In the summer of 1778, with the war poised to turn in his favor, General George Washington desperately needed to know where the British would strike next. To that end, he unleashed his secret weapon: an unlikely ring of spies in New York charged with discovering the enemy’s battle plans and military strategy.

Washington’s small band included a young Quaker torn between political principle and family loyalty, a swashbuckling sailor addicted to the perils of espionage, a hard-drinking barkeep, a Yale-educated cavalryman and friend of the doomed Nathan Hale, and a peaceful, sickly farmer who begged Washington to let him retire but who always came through in the end. Personally guiding these imperfect everyday heroes was Washington himself. In an era when officers were gentlemen, and gentlemen didn’ t spy, he possessed an extraordinary talent for deception—and proved an adept spymaster.

The men he mentored were dubbed the Culper Ring. The British secret service tried to hunt them down, but they escaped by the closest of shaves thanks to their ciphers, dead drops, and invisible ink. Rose’s thrilling narrative tells the unknown story of the Revolution–the murderous intelligence war, gunrunning and kidnapping, defectors and executioners—that has never appeared in the history books. But Washington’s Spies is also a spirited, touching account of friendship and trust, fear and betrayal, amid the dark and silent world of the spy.

Marie Antoinette's Watch [EPUB]

Marie Antoinette's Watch [EPUB]
Marie Antoinette's Watch: Adultery, Larceny & Perpetual Motion
2015 | EPUB + MOBI | 0.52/0.67MB

Across continents and into and out of the hands of royalty, revolutionaries, smugglers, thieves, and the world’s greatest tech engineers, was Marie Antoinette’s watch, the “160,” worth an estimated $40 million in today’s dollars. Perhaps the most sought after personal technology device of the last 200 years, the timepiece, designed by the legendary Abraham-Louis Breguet, is the launching point for a thrilling and fluidly woven set of narratives that are, in part, forbidden love story, historical document, and police procedural.

Nature's Design: Exploring the Mysteries of the Natural World [EPUB]

Nature's Design: Exploring the Mysteries of the Natural World [EPUB]
Nature's Design: Exploring the Mysteries of the Natural World by Richard L Thompson
2011 | EPUB | 2.85MB

What's so special about grass? Why do cows have four stomachs? When will lions give their last roar? How do animals plan menus - and co-ordinate hunts? Why do bees dance? How many elephants are too many?

This compelling book explores and finds answers to some of Nature's most intriguing mysteries. Drawing on the African landscape, the author looks at the biology and physiology of animals and plants, and their adaptations in a world of unpredictable change. Wide-ranging chapters cover, among other topics, mass extinctions, the world's grasslands, predators and prey, FIV in lions, chemical communication and that most contentious of issues - animal consciousness. Playful line drawings illustrate the text, to make a bumper read for anyone with an interest in the workings of the natural world.

Exuberance: The Passion for Life [EPUB]

Exuberance: The Passion for Life [EPUB]
Exuberance: The Passion for Life by Kay Redfield Jamison
2004 | EPUB | 2.87MB

The author of the bestselling An Unquiet Mind–and internationally renowned authority on mood disorders–now gives us something wonderfully different: an exploration of exuberance and how it fuels our most important creative and scientific achievements.

John Muir’s lifelong passion to save America’s wild places, Wilson Bentley’s legendary obsession to record for posterity the beauty of individual snowflakes, the boundless scientific curiosity behind Watson and Crick’s discovery of DNA, sea lions that surf and porcupines that dance–Kay Redfield Jamison shows how these and many more examples both human and animal define the nature of exuberance, and how this exuberance relates to intellectual searching, risk-taking, creativity, and survival itself. She examines the hereditary predisposition to exuberance; the role of the brain chemical dopamine; the connection between positive moods and psychological resilience; and the differences between exuberance and mania. She delves into some of the phenomena of exuberance–the contagiousness of laughter, the giddiness of new love, the intoxicating effects of music and of religious ecstasy–while also addressing the dangerous desire to simulate exuberance by using drugs or alcohol. In a fascinating and intimate coda to the rest of the book, renowned scientists, writers, and politicians share their thoughts on the forms and role of exuberance in their own lives.

Original, inspiring, authoritative, Exuberance brims with the very energy and passion that it celebrates.

How to Behave: Dating and Sex [EPUB]

How to Behave: Dating and Sex [EPUB]
How to Behave: Dating and Sex: A Guide to Modern Manners for the Socially Challenged by Caroline Tiger, Dan Sipple
2006 | EPUB | 3.13MB

Mind your manners!

Is it ever okay to "embellish" your online profile? What's the best way to deal with close-talkers? How can you handle a date who shows too much PDA? Discover the answers to these and other burning questions in Caroline Tiger's guide to modern love, How to Behave: Dating and Sex. You'll learn the proper etiquette for:

  • Disarming the over-toucher
  • Ditching your date with aplomb
  • Accepting rejection gracefully
  • Doing the wet spot tango
  • Avoiding scratchy stubble face-burn
  • Negotiating "ex sex"

With more than 60 scenarios that run the gamut from flirting to first date etiquette to oral sex, this refreshingly new take on social manners deals with the real-life etiquette questions everyone wonders about . . . but has been afraid to ask.

Improve Your Memory Every Day [EPUB]

Improve Your Memory Every Day [EPUB]
Improve Your Memory Every Day by Robert Allen
2015 | EPUB | 10.71MB

Memory is like a muscle: you either use it or lose it. Consider this definitive guide a personal trainer for the brain, one with a huge assortment of entertaining and fast-acting memory-strengthening techniques. Use them to draw upon daily, when trying to find lost keys, recall anniversaries, or study for exams. Test your sharpness with fun instant assessments. Try intriguing short- and long-term memory tasks, such as remembering a series of long words and recalling landmarks on a map. Follow a monthlong plan of “do it in a day” exercises. In addition to invaluable “Tips and Tricks” boxes, there’s advice on boosting concentration, using mnemonics, and other forms of mental association.