Tools for Survival: What You Need to Survive When You're on Your Own [Audiobook]

Tools for Survival: What You Need to Survive When You're on Your Own [Audiobook]
Tools for Survival: What You Need to Survive When You're on Your Own [Audiobook] by James Wesley Rawles, read by Phil Gigante
2014 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 12 mins | 176.52MB

In his earlier bestselling nonfiction book, How to Survive the End of the World as We Know It, James Wesley, Rawles, outlined the foundations for survivalist living.

Now, he details the tools needed to survive anything from a short-term disruption to a long-term, grid-down scenario. Rawles covers tools for every aspect of self sufficient living, including:

  • Food Preservation and Cooking
  • Welding and Blacksmithing
  • Timber, Firewood, and Lumber
  • Firefighting

Field-tested and comprehensive, Tools for Survival is certain to become a must-have reference for the burgeoning survivalist/prepper movement.

The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer [Audiobook]

The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer [Audiobook]
The Man Who Knew Too Much: Alan Turing and the Invention of the Computer [Audiobook] by David Leavitt, read by Paul Michael Garcia
2014 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 262.84MB

A '"skillful, literate'" (New York Times Book Review) biography of the persecuted genius who helped create the modern computer.

To solve one of the great mathematical problems of his day, Alan Turing proposed an imaginary computer. Then, attempting to break a Nazi code during World War II, he successfully designed and built one, thus ensuring the Allied victory. Turing became a champion of artificial intelligence, but his work was cut short. As an openly gay man at a time when homosexuality was illegal in England, he was convicted and forced to undergo a humiliating "treatment" that may have led to his suicide.

With a novelist's sensitivity, David Leavitt portrays Turing in all his humanity - his eccentricities, his brilliance, his fatal candor - and elegantly explains his work and its implications.

The Last Unicorn: A Search for One of Earth's Rarest Creatures [Audiobook]

The Last Unicorn: A Search for One of Earth's Rarest Creatures [Audiobook]
The Last Unicorn: A Search for One of Earth's Rarest Creatures [Audiobook] by William deBuys, read by the Author
2015 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 18 hours | 357.06MB

An award-winning author's stirring quest to find and understand an elusive and exceptionally rare species in the heart of Southeast Asia's jungles.

In 1992, in a remote mountain range, a team of scientists discovered the remains of an unusual animal with beautiful, long horns. It turned out to be a living species new to Western science - a saola, the first large land mammal discovered in 50 years.

Rare then and rarer now, no Westerner had glimpsed a live saola in the wild before Pulitzer Prize finalist and nature writer William deBuys and conservation biologist William Robichaud set off to search for it in the wilds of central Laos. The team endured a punishing trek, up and down whitewater rivers and through mountainous terrain ribboned with the snare lines of armed poachers.

In the tradition of Bruce Chatwin, Colin Thubron, and Peter Matthiessen, The Last Unicorn is deBuys' look deep into one of the world's most remote places. As in the pursuit of the unicorn, the journey ultimately becomes a quest for the essence of wildness in nature and an encounter with beauty.

Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows [Audiobook]

Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows [Audiobook]
Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows [Audiobook] by Will Bagley, read by Charles Henderson Norman
2015 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB + MOBI | 20 hrs 17 mins | 575.59MB

The massacre at Mountain Meadows on September 11, 1857, was the single most violent attack on a wagon train in the 30-year history of the Oregon and California trails. Yet it has been all but forgotten. Will Bagley's Blood of the Prophets is an award-winning, riveting account of the attack on the Baker-Fancher wagon train by Mormons in the local militia and a few Paiute Indians. Based on extensive investigation of the events surrounding the murder of over 120 men, women, and children, and drawing from a wealth of primary sources, Bagley explains how the murders occurred, reveals the involvement of territorial governor Brigham Young, and explores the subsequent suppression and distortion of events related to the massacre by the Mormon Church and others.

The Wilderness of Ruin [Audiobook]

The Wilderness of Ruin [Audiobook]
The Wilderness of Ruin: A Tale of Madness, Fire, and the Hunt for America's Youngest Serial Killer [Audiobook] by Roseanne Montillo, read by Emily Woo Zeller
2015 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 8 hrs 58 mins | 253.77MB

An enthralling tale of madness and murder, set against the backdrop of Boston's Great Fire and America's Gilded Age

In 1871, young children were disappearing from Boston's working- class neighborhoods. The few who returned told desperate tales of being taken to the woods and tortured by a boy not much older than themselves. The police were skeptical—these children were from poor families, so their testimony was easily discounted. And after the Great Boston Fire of 1872 reduced much of downtown to rubble, the city had more pressing concerns. Finally, when the police apprehended Jesse Pomeroy for the crimes, he, like any twelve-year-old, was sent off to reform school. Little thought was given to the danger he might pose to society, despite victims' chilling reports of this affectless Boy Torturer.

Sixteen months later, Jesse was released in the care of his mother, and within months a ten-year-old girl and a four-year-old boy went missing, their mutilated bodies later discovered by police. This set off a frantic hunt for Pomeroy, who was now proclaimed America's youngest serial killer. When he was captured and brought to trial, his case transfixed the nation, and two public figures—Herman Melville and Oliver Wendell Holmes—each probed the depths of Pomeroy's character in a search for the meaning behind his madness.

Roseanne Montillo, author of the acclaimed The Lady and Her Monsters, takes us inside those harrowing years, as a city reeling from great disaster reckoned with the moral quandaries posed by Pomeroy's spree. What makes a person good or evil? How do we develop as moral beings? At what age do we hold someone responsible for violating society's moral code? And what does our fascination with such ghastly deeds reveal about us?

The Wilderness of Ruin is a dazzling combination of true-crime thrills, a fresh perspective on mental illness, and a fascinating look at American class turmoil that captures the spirit of a turbulent age.

The Economist Audio Edition [July 11, 2015]

The Economist Audio Edition [July 11, 2015]
The Economist Audio Edition [July 11, 2015]
MP3@48 kbps + EPUB + MOBI | 174.91MB

China embraces the markets

  • Greece: the way ahead
  • Stub out smoking
  • Turkana, a glimpse of Africa's future
  • The travels of an Indian towel

INSIDE: A SPECIAL REPORT ON MENTAL ILLNESS

The Facebook Effectd [Audiobook]

The Facebook Effectd [Audiobook]
The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That Is Connecting the World [Audiobook] by David Kirkpatrick, read by the Author
2010 | MP3 VBR V5 + EPUB | 15 hrs 37 mins | 483.98MB

In a little more than half a decade, Facebook has gone from a dorm-room novelty to a company with 500 million users - and an essential part of the social life not only of teenagers but hundreds of millions of adults worldwide. As Facebook spreads around the globe, it creates surprising effects - even becoming instrumental in political protests.

Veteran technology reporter David Kirkpatrick had the full cooperation of Facebook's key executives in researching this fascinating history. Kirkpatrick tells us how Facebook was created, why it has flourished, and where it is going next. He chronicles its successes and missteps, and gives readers the most complete assessment anywhere of founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, the central figure in the company's remarkable ascent. This is the Facebook story that can be found nowhere else.

Kirkpatrick shows how Zuckerberg refused to compromise, insistently focusing on growth over profits and preaching that Facebook must dominate (his word) communication on the Internet. In the process, he and a small group of key executives have created a company that has changed social life in the United States and elsewhere, a company that has become a ubiquitous presence in marketing, and one that has altered politics, business, and even our sense of our own identity. This is the Facebook Effect.

This special edition also includes an exclusive conversation between the author and Randi Zuckerberg, who offers unique insight as a marketer at Facebook and the CEO's sister. You'll hear them talk about major company milestones, high-profile product launches, and the CEO's growth - emotionally and experientially - as a leader. They also discuss the controversial issues surrounding Facebook's privacy policies.

Triumphs of Experience: The Men of the Harvard Grant Study [Audiobook]

Triumphs of Experience: The Men of the Harvard Grant Study [Audiobook]
Triumphs of Experience: The Men of the Harvard Grant Study [Audiobook] by George E Vaillant, read by Don Hagen
2013 | MP3@96 kbps + PDF Tables | 12 hrs 37 mins | 536.93MB

At a time when many people around the world are living into their 10th decade, the longest longitudinal study of human development ever undertaken offers some welcome news for the new old age: Our lives continue to evolve in our later years and often become more fulfilling than before.

Begun in 1938, the Grant Study of Adult Development charted the physical and emotional health of over 200 men, starting with their undergraduate days. The now-classic Adaptation to Life reported on the men's lives up to age 55 and helped us understand adult maturation. Now George Vaillant follows the men into their 90s, documenting for the first time what it is like to flourish far beyond conventional retirement.

Reporting on all aspects of male life - including relationships, politics and religion, coping strategies, and alcohol use - Triumphs of Experience shares a number of surprising findings. For example, the people who do well in old age did not necessarily do so well in midlife and vice versa. While the study confirms that recovery from a lousy childhood is possible, memories of a happy childhood are a lifelong source of strength. Marriages bring much more contentment after age 70, and physical aging after 80 is determined less by heredity than by habits formed prior to age 50. The credit for growing old with grace and vitality, it seems, goes more to ourselves than to our stellar genetic makeup.

Big Science: Ernest Lawrence and the Invention That Launched the Military-Industrial Complex [EPUB]

Big Science: Ernest Lawrence and the Invention That Launched the Military-Industrial Complex [EPUB]
Big Science: Ernest Lawrence and the Invention That Launched the Military-Industrial Complex by Michael Hiltzik
2015 | EPUB | 45.74MB

From a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and Los Angeles Times contributor, the untold story of how science went “big,” built the bombs that helped win World War II, and became dependent on government and industry—and the forgotten genius who started it all, Ernest Lawrence.

Since the 1930s, the scale of scientific endeavors has grown exponentially. Machines have become larger, ambitions bolder. The first particle accelerator cost less than one hundred dollars and could be held in its creator’s palm, while its descendant, the Large Hadron Collider, cost ten billion dollars and is seventeen miles in circumference. Scientists have invented nuclear weapons, put a man on the moon, and examined nature at the subatomic scale—all through Big Science, the industrial-scale research paid for by governments and corporations that have driven the great scientific projects of our time.

The birth of Big Science can be traced to Berkeley, California, nearly nine decades ago, when a resourceful young scientist with a talent for physics and an even greater talent for promotion pondered his new invention and declared, “I’m going to be famous!” Ernest Orlando Lawrence’s cyclotron would revolutionize nuclear physics, but that was only the beginning of its impact. It would change our understanding of the basic building blocks of nature. It would help win World War II. Its influence would be felt in academia and international politics. It was the beginning of Big Science.

This is the incredible story of how one invention changed the world and of the man principally responsible for it all. Michael Hiltzik tells the riveting full story here for the first time.

The Billion Dollar Spy: A True Story of Cold War Espionage and Betrayal [EPUB]

The Billion Dollar Spy: A True Story of Cold War Espionage and Betrayal [EPUB]
The Billion Dollar Spy: A True Story of Cold War Espionage and Betrayal by David E Hoffman
2015 | EPUB | 0.42MB

From the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning history The Dead Hand comes the riveting story of a spy who cracked open the Soviet military research establishment and a penetrating portrait of the CIA’s Moscow station, an outpost of daring espionage in the last years of the Cold War

While driving out of the American embassy in Moscow on the evening of February 16, 1978, the chief of the CIA’s Moscow station heard a knock on his car window. A man on the curb handed him an envelope whose contents stunned U.S. intelligence: details of top-secret Soviet research and developments in military technology that were totally unknown to the United States. In the years that followed, the man, Adolf Tolkachev, an engineer in a Soviet military design bureau, used his high-level access to hand over tens of thousands of pages of technical secrets. His revelations allowed America to reshape its weapons systems to defeat Soviet radar on the ground and in the air, giving the United States near total superiority in the skies over Europe.

One of the most valuable spies to work for the United States in the four decades of global confrontation with the Soviet Union, Tolkachev took enormous personal risks—but so did the Americans. The CIA had long struggled to recruit and run agents in Moscow, and Tolkachev was a singular breakthrough. Using spy cameras and secret codes as well as face-to-face meetings in parks and on street corners, Tolkachev and his handlers succeeded for years in eluding the feared KGB in its own backyard, until the day came when a shocking betrayal put them all at risk.

Drawing on previously secret documents obtained from the CIA and on interviews with participants, David Hoffman has created an unprecedented and poignant portrait of Tolkachev, a man motivated by the depredations of the Soviet state to master the craft of spying against his own country. Stirring, unpredictable, and at times unbearably tense, The Billion Dollar Spy is a brilliant feat of reporting that unfolds like an espionage thriller.