DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule that Shook the World [EPUB]

DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule that Shook the World [EPUB]
DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule that Shook the World by Israel Rosenfield, Edward Ziff, Borin Van Loon
2011 | EPUB | 36.92MB

With humor, depth, and philosophical and historical insight, DNA reaches out to a wide range of readers with its graphic portrayal of a complicated science. Suitable for use in and out of the classroom, this volume covers DNA's many marvels, from its original discovery in 1869 to early-twentieth-century debates on the mechanisms of inheritance and the deeper nature of life's evolution and variety.

Even readers who lack a background in science and philosophy will learn a tremendous amount from this engaging narrative. The book elucidates DNA's relationship to health and the cause and cure of disease. It also covers the creation of new life forms, nanomachines, and perspectives on crime detection, and considers the philosophical sources of classical Darwinian theory and recent, radical changes in the understanding of evolution itself. Already these developments have profoundly affected our notions about living things. Borin Van Loon's humorous illustrations recount the contributions of Gregor Mendel, Frederick Griffith, James Watson, and Francis Crick, among other biologists, scientists, and researchers, and vividly depict the modern controversies surrounding the Human Genome Project and cloning.

A Question of Time: The Ultimate Paradox [EPUB]

A Question of Time: The Ultimate Paradox [EPUB]
A Question of Time: The Ultimate Paradox by Scientific American Editors
2012 | EPUB + MOBI | 0.7/0.9MB

“What time is it?” That simple question is probably asked more often in contemporary society than ever before. In our clock-studded world, the answer is never more than a glance away, and so we can blissfully partition our days into ever smaller increments for ever more tightly scheduled tasks.

Modern scientific revelations about time, however, make the question endlessly frustrating. If we seek a precise knowledge of the time, the infinitesimal flash of now dissolves into a scattering flock of nanoseconds. Because we are bound by the speed of light and the velocity of nerve impulses, our perception of the “present” reflects the world as it occurred an instant ago – for all that human consciousness pretends otherwise, we can never catch up. Even in principle, perfect synchronicity escapes us. Relativity dictates that, like a strange syrup, time flows slower on moving trains than in the stations and faster in the mountains than in the valleys. The time for our wristwatch is not exactly the same as the time for our head.

This eBook, A Question of Time, summarizes what science has discovered about how time permeates and guides both our physical world and our inner selves. That knowledge should enrich the imagination and provide practical advantages to anyone hoping to beat the clock, or at least to stay in step with it. Synchronize your watches…

How Women Got Their Curves and Other Just-So Stories [PDF]

How Women Got Their Curves and Other Just-So Stories [PDF]
How Women Got Their Curves and Other Just-So Stories: Evolutionary Enigmas by David P Barash, Judith Eve Lipton
2009 | PDF | 2.64MB

So how did women get their curves? Why do they have breasts, while other mammals only develop breast tissue while lactating, and why do women menstruate, when virtually no other beings do so? What are the reasons for female orgasm? Why are human females kept in the dark about their own time of ovulation and maximum fertility, and why are they the only animals to experience menopause?

David P. Barash and Judith Eve Lipton, coauthors of acclaimed books on human sexuality and gender, discuss the theories scientists have advanced to explain these evolutionary enigmas (sometimes called "Just-So stories" by their detractors) and present hypotheses of their own. Some scientific theories are based on legitimate empirical data, while others are pure speculation. Barash and Lipton distinguish between what is solid and what remains uncertain, skillfully incorporating their expert knowledge of biology, psychology, animal behavior, anthropology, and human sexuality into their entertaining critiques. Inviting readers to examine the evidence and draw their own conclusions, Barash and Lipton tell an evolutionary suspense story that captures the excitement and thrill of true scientific detection.

What Galileo Saw: Imagining the Scientific Revolution [PDF]

What Galileo Saw: Imagining the Scientific Revolution [PDF]
What Galileo Saw: Imagining the Scientific Revolution by Lawrence Lipking
2014 | PDF | 1.52MB

The Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century has often been called a decisive turning point in human history. It represents, for good or ill, the birth of modern science and modern ways of viewing the world.

In What Galileo Saw, Lawrence Lipking offers a new perspective on how to understand what happened then, arguing that artistic imagination and creativity as much as rational thought played a critical role in creating new visions of science and in shaping stories about eye-opening discoveries in cosmology, natural history, engineering, and the life sciences.

When Galileo saw the face of the Moon and the moons of Jupiter, Lipking writes, he had to picture a cosmos that could account for them. Kepler thought his geometry could open a window into the mind of God. Francis Bacon's natural history envisioned an order of things that would replace the illusions of language with solid evidence and transform notions of life and death. Descartes designed a hypothetical "Book of Nature" to explain how everything in the universe was constructed. Thomas Browne reconceived the boundaries of truth and error. Robert Hooke, like Leonardo, was both researcher and artist; his schemes illuminate the microscopic and the macrocosmic. And when Isaac Newton imagined nature as a coherent and comprehensive mathematical system, he redefined the goals of science and the meaning of genius.

What Galileo Saw bridges the divide between science and art; it brings together Galileo and Milton, Bacon and Shakespeare. Lipking enters the minds and the workshops where the Scientific Revolution was fashioned, drawing on art, literature, and the history of science to reimagine how perceptions about the world and human life could change so drastically, and change forever.

Satellite Basics For Everyone [EPUB]

Satellite Basics For Everyone [EPUB]
Satellite Basics For Everyone: An Illustrated Guide to Satellites for Non-Technical and Technical People by C Robert Welti
2012 | EPUB | 3.68MB

Learn about satellites that affect us every day, how they work, and how we can place and keep them on orbit.

Satellite Basics for Everyone presents an introduction and overview to satellites. It’s written as clearly and understandably as possible for a wide audience. It provides a learning tool for grade school students. High school and college students can use it for helping them decide on career fields. It’s for people with curious minds who want to know about satellites that affect their daily lives. And, it provides a training tool and an overview for people who build, operate, and use data collected by satellites.

Satellite Basics for Everyone describes satellite missions, orbits, population, closeness, debris, collision risk, builders, owners, operators, launch vehicles, and costs. Focus then turns to describing the orbit, components, environment, and operation of the geostationary communications satellite because it affects our daily lives the most by providing television, radio, commercial business, Internet and telephone services. A description of satellite motion prepares for the included Mission Planning Example of how to place and keep this satellite on orbit and keep the antennas pointing in the right direction to perform its mission.

The main objective of this book is to stimulate a broad interest in engineering and science.

Uncertainty, Expectations, and Financial Instability [EPUB]

Uncertainty, Expectations, and Financial Instability [EPUB]
Uncertainty, Expectations, and Financial Instability: Reviving Allais's Lost Theory of Psychological Time by Eric Barthalon
2014 | EPUB + PDF | 19.41/3.79MB

Eric Barthalon applies the neglected theory of psychological time and memory decay of Nobel Prize--winning economist Maurice Allais (1911--2010) to model investors' psychology in the present context of recurrent financial crises. Shaped by the behavior of the demand for money during episodes of hyperinflation, Allais's theory proves economic agents perceive the flow of clocks' time and forget the past at a context-dependent pace: rapidly in the presence of persistent and accelerating inflation and slowly in the event of the opposite situation. Barthalon recasts Allais's work as a general theory of "expectations" under uncertainty, closing the gap between economic theory and investors' behavior.

Barthalon extends Allais's theory to the field of financial instability, demonstrating its relevance to nominal interest rates in a variety of empirical scenarios and the positive nonlinear feedback that exists between asset price inflation and the demand for risky assets. Reviewing the works of the leading protagonists in the expectations controversy, Barthalon exposes the limitations of adaptive and rational expectations models and, by means of the perceived risk of loss, calls attention to the speculative bubbles that lacked the positive displacement discussed in Kindleberger's model of financial crises. He ultimately extrapolates Allaisian theory into a pragmatic approach to investor behavior and the natural instability of financial markets. He concludes with the policy implications for governments and regulators. Balanced and coherent, this book will be invaluable to researchers working in macreconomics, financial economics, behavioral finance, decision theory, and the history of economic thought.

A Different Democracy [EPUB]

A Different Democracy [EPUB]
A Different Democracy: American Government in a 31-Country Perspective by Steven L Taylor, Matthew S Shugart, Arend Lijphart, Bernard Grofman
2014 | EPUB | 13.58MB

Four distinguished scholars in political science analyze American democracy from a comparative point of view, exploring how the U.S. political system differs from that of thirty other democracies and what those differences ultimately mean for democratic performance. This essential text approaches the following institutions from a political engineering point of view: constitutions, electoral systems, and political parties, as well as legislative, executive, and judicial power. The text looks at democracies from around the world over a two-decade time frame.

The result is not only a fresh view of the much-discussed theme of American exceptionalism but also an innovative approach to comparative politics that treats the United States as but one case among many. An ideal textbook for both American and comparative politics courses.

Hemingway Lives: Why Reading Ernest Hemingway Matters Today [EPUB]

Hemingway Lives: Why Reading Ernest Hemingway Matters Today [EPUB]
Hemingway Lives: Why Reading Ernest Hemingway Matters Today by Clancy Sigal
2013 | EPUB | 7.52MB

With the release of a flurry of feature and TV films about his life and work, and the publication of new books looking at his correspondence, his boat and even his favorite cocktails, Ernest Hemingway is once again center stage of contemporary culture. Now, in this concise and sparkling account of the life and work of America's most storied writer, Clancy Sigal, himself a National Book Award runner-up, presents a persuasive case for the relevance of Ernest Hemingway to readers today.

Sigal breaks new ground in celebrating Hemingway's passionate and unapologetic political partisanship, his stunningly concise, no-frills writing style, and an attitude to sex and sexuality much more nuanced than he is traditionally credited with. Simply for the pleasure provided by a consummate story teller, Hemingway is as much a must-read author as ever.

Though Hemingway Lives! will provide plenty that's new for those already familiar with Papa's oeuvre, it assumes no prior knowledge of his work. Those venturing into Hemingway's writing for the first time will find in Sigal an inspirational and erudite guide.

Metaphysics: The Fundamentals [PDF]

Metaphysics: The Fundamentals [PDF]
Metaphysics: The Fundamentals by Robert C. Koons and Timothy Pickavance
2015 | PDF | 1.39MB

Metaphysics: The Fundamentals presents readers with a systematic, comprehensive introductory overview of modern analytic metaphysics.

  • Presents an accessible, up-to-date and broad-ranging survey of one of the most dynamic and often daunting sub- fields in contemporary philosophy
  • Introduces readers to the seminal works of contemporary and historic philosophers, including Descartes, Leibniz, Russell, David Lewis, Alvin Plantinga, Kit Fine, Peter van Inwagen, John Hawthorne and many others
  • Explores key questions while identifying important assumptions, axioms, and methodological principles
  • Addresses topics in ontology, modality, causality, and universals; as well as issues surrounding material composition, persistence, space, and time

Reconstructing Reality: Models, Mathematics, and Simulations [PDF]

Reconstructing Reality: Models, Mathematics, and Simulations [PDF]
Reconstructing Reality: Models, Mathematics, and Simulations (Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Science) by Margaret Morrison
2015 | PDF | 1.99MB
  • Addresses several issues that are significant for the philosophical literature as well as subjects of interest to philosophically-minded scientists
  • Puts forward the rather controversial thesis that in certain contexts computer simulation can function as method for experimental measurement
  • Emphasizes the importance of and reliance on simulation in larger experimental contexts, paying particular attention to the search for the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider
  • Argues that the traditional distinction between experiment and simulation is no longer applicable and needs to be rethought

Attempts to understand various aspects of the empirical world often rely on modelling processes that involve a reconstruction of systems under investigation. Typically the reconstruction uses mathematical frameworks like gauge theory and renormalization group methods, but more recently simulations also have become an indispensable tool for investigation.

This book is a philosophical examination of techniques and assumptions related to modelling and simulation with the goal of showing how these abstract descriptions can contribute to our understanding of the physical world. Particular issues include the role of fictional models in science, how mathematical formalisms can yield physical information, and how we should approach the use of inconsistent models for specific types of systems. It also addresses the role of simulation, specifically the conditions under which simulation can be seen as a technique for measurement, replacing more traditional experimental approaches. Inherent worries about the legitimacy of simulation <"knowledge>" are also addressed, including an analysis of verification and validation and the role of simulation data in the search for the Higgs boson. In light of the significant role played by simulation in the Large Hadron Collider experiments, it is argued that the traditional distinction between simulation and experiment is no longer applicable in some contexts of modern science. Consequently, a re-evaluation of the way and extent to which simulation delivers empirical knowledge is required.

Nietzsche: A Beginner's Guide [EPUB]

Nietzsche: A Beginner's Guide [EPUB]
Nietzsche: A Beginner's Guide by Robert Wicks
2010 | EPUB | 0.2MB

Often quoted, influential, and highly divisive, Nietzsche remains an enigma long after his death. This clear primer moves deftly through the controversy to examine the philosopher’s work in the context of his tumultuous childhood and Christian upbringing. Discussing his infamous declaration that “God is dead”, his posthumous association with Nazism, and his criticisms of conventional morality, this book is the ideal introduction to the much debated thinker and his extensive legacy.

George Whitefield: America's Spiritual Founding Father [EPUB]

George Whitefield: America's Spiritual Founding Father [EPUB]
George Whitefield: America's Spiritual Founding Father by Thomas S Kidd
2014 | EPUB | 2.83MB

In the years prior to the American Revolution, George Whitefield was the most famous man in the colonies. Thomas Kidd’s fascinating new biography explores the extraordinary career of the most influential figure in the first generation of Anglo-American evangelical Christianity, examining his sometimes troubling stands on the pressing issues of the day, both secular and spiritual, and his relationships with such famous contemporaries as Benjamin Franklin, Jonathan Edwards, and John Wesley.

Based on the author’s comprehensive studies of Whitefield’s original sermons, journals, and letters, this excellent history chronicles the phenomenal rise of the trailblazer of the Great Awakening. Whitefield’s leadership role among the new evangelicals of the eighteenth century and his many religious disputes are meticulously covered, as are his major legacies and the permanent marks he left on evangelical Christian faith. It is arguably the most balanced biography to date of a controversial religious leader who, though relatively unknown three hundred years after his birth, was a true giant in his day and remains an important figure in America’s history.

Romanticism, Origins, and the History of Heredity [PDF]

Romanticism, Origins, and the History of Heredity [PDF]
Romanticism, Origins, and the History of Heredity (New Studies in the Age of Goethe) by Christine Lehleiter
2014 | PDF | 4.27MB

At the turn of the eighteenth century, selfhood was understood as a “tabula rasa” to be imprinted in the course of an individual’s life. By the middle of the nineteenth-century, however, the individual had become defined as determined by heredity already from birth. Examining novels by Goethe, Jean Paul, and E.T.A. Hoffmann, studies on plant hybridization, treatises on animal breeding, and anatomical collections, Romanticism, Origins, and the History of Heredity delineates how romantic authors imagined the ramifications of emerging notions of heredity for the conceptualization of selfhood.

Focusing on three fields of inquiry—inbreeding and incest, cross-breeding and bastardization, evolution and autopoiesis—Christine Lehleiter proposes that the notion of selfhood for which Romanticism has become known was not threatened by considerations of determinism and evolution, but was in fact already a result of these very considerations. Romanticism, Origins and the History of Heredity will be of interest for literary scholars, historians of science, and all readers fascinated by the long durée of subjectivity and evolutionary thought.

The Age of the Poets [EPUB]

The Age of the Poets [EPUB]
The Age of the Poets: And Other Writings on Twentieth-Century Poetry and Prose by Alain Badiou
2014 | EPUB | 2.43MB

The Age of the Poets revisits the age-old problem of the relation between literature and philosophy, arguing against both Plato and Heidegger’s famous arguments. Philosophy neither has to ban the poets from the republic nor abdicate its own powers to the sole benefit of poetry or art. Instead, it must declare the end of what Badiou names the “age of the poets,” which stretches from Hölderlin to Celan. Drawing on ideas from his first publication on the subject, “The Autonomy of the Aesthetic Process,” Badiou offers an illuminating set of readings of contemporary French prose writers, giving us fascinating insights into the theory of the novel while also accounting for the specific position of literature between science and ideology.

What Does a Jew Want? [EPUB]

What Does a Jew Want? [EPUB]
What Does a Jew Want: On Binationalism and Other Specters by Slavoj Žižek, Alain Badiou, Judith Butler
2011 | EPUB | 2.92MB
"In this book Udi Aloni, causing a power fault in the ruling liberal attitude by way of short-circuiting different levels of ideology, art, and thought; rewrites the Oedipus myth and rejects liberal Zionism. Who but Aloni can combine the tremendous poetic power of creating new myths with the perspicuous mind of a cold theoretician? Who but Aloni can ground his ruthless critique of Zionism into his unconditional fidelity to the Jewish tradition? If anyone needs a proof that political theology is well and alive, here it is!"—Slavoj Žižek

In the hopes of promoting justice, peace, and solidarity for and with the Palestine people, Udi Aloni joins with Judith Butler, Alain Badiou, and Slavoj Žižek to confront the core issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Their bold question: Will a new generation of Israelis and Palestinians dare to walk together toward a joint Israel-Palestine? Through a collage of meditation, interview, diary, and essay, Aloni and his interlocutors present a personal, intellectual, and altogether provocative account rich with the insights of philosophy and critical theory. They ultimately foresee the emergence of a binational Israeli-Palestinian state, incorporating the work of Walter Benjamin, Edward Said, and Jacques Derrida-as well as Jewish theology-to recast the conflict in secular theological terms.

Gulag Voices: Oral Histories of Soviet Incarceration and Exile [PDF]

Gulag Voices: Oral Histories of Soviet Incarceration and Exile [PDF]
Gulag Voices: Oral Histories of Soviet Incarceration and Exile by Jehanne M Gheith, Katherine R Jolluck
2011 | PDF | 3.58MB

In this volume, the powerful voices of Gulag survivors become accessible to English-speaking audiences for the first time through oral histories, rather than written memoirs. It brings together interviews with men and women, members of the working class and intelligentsia, people who live in the major cities and those from the "provinces," and from an array of corrective hard labor camps and prisons across the former Soviet Union. Its aims are threefold: 1) to give a sense of the range of the Gulag experience and its consequences for Russian society; 2) to make the Gulag relevant to English-speaking readers by offering comparisons to historical catastrophes they are likely to know more about, such as the Holocaust; and 3) to discuss issues of oral history and memory in the cultural context of Soviet and post-Soviet society.

The Mysteries of the Marco Polo Maps [PDF]

The Mysteries of the Marco Polo Maps [PDF]
The Mysteries of the Marco Polo Maps by Benjamin B Olshin
2014 | PDF | 3.2MB

In the thirteenth century, Italian merchant and explorer Marco Polo traveled from Venice to the far reaches of Asia, a journey he chronicled in a narrative titled Il Milione, later known as The Travels of Marco Polo. While Polo’s writings would go on to inspire the likes of Christopher Columbus, scholars have long debated their veracity. Some have argued that Polo never even reached China, while others believe that he came as far as the Americas. Now, there’s new evidence for this historical puzzle: a very curious collection of fourteen little-known maps and related documents said to have belonged to the family of Marco Polo himself.

In The Mysteries of the Marco Polo Maps, historian of cartography Benjamin B. Olshin offers the first credible book-length analysis of these artifacts, charting their course from obscure origins in the private collection of Italian-American immigrant Marcian Rossi in the 1930s; to investigations of their authenticity by the Library of Congress, J. Edgar Hoover, and the FBI; to the work of the late cartographic scholar Leo Bagrow; to Olshin’s own efforts to track down and study the Rossi maps, all but one of which are in the possession of Rossi’s great-grandson Jeffrey Pendergraft. Are the maps forgeries, facsimiles, or modernized copies? Did Marco Polo’s daughters—whose names appear on several of the artifacts—preserve in them geographic information about Asia first recorded by their father? Or did they inherit maps created by him? Did Marco Polo entrust the maps to Admiral Ruggero Sanseverino, who has links to Rossi’s family line? Or, if the maps have no connection to Marco Polo, who made them, when, and why?

Regardless of the maps’ provenance, Olshin’s tale—stretching from the remote reaches of the northern Pacific to early Chinese legends—takes readers on a journey confounding yet fascinating, offering insights into Italian history, the age of exploration, and the wonders of cartography.

Seizing Freedom: Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All [EPUB]

Seizing Freedom: Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All [EPUB]
Seizing Freedom: Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All by David Roediger
2014 | EPUB | 2.6MB

How did America recover after its years of civil war? How did freed men and women, former slaves, respond to their newly won freedom? David Roediger’s radical new history redefines the idea of freedom after the jubilee, using fresh sources and texts to build on the leading historical accounts of Emancipation and Reconstruction.

Reinstating ex-slaves’ own “freedom dreams” in constructing these histories, Roediger creates a masterful account of the emancipation and its ramifications on a whole host of day-to-day concerns for Whites and Blacks alike, such as property relations, gender roles, and labor.

Thinking About it Only Makes it Worse [EPUB]

Thinking About it Only Makes it Worse [EPUB]
Thinking About it Only Makes it Worse: And Other Lessons from Modern Life by David Mitchell
2014 | EPUB | 0.3MB

What's wrong with calling a burglar brave? Why are people so f***ing hung up about swearing? Why do the asterisks in that sentence make it okay? Why do so many people want to stop other people doing things, and how can they be stopped from stopping them? Why is every film and TV programme a sequel or a remake? Why are we so reliant on perpetual diversion that someone has created chocolate toothpaste? Is there anything to be done about the Internet?

These and many other questions trouble David Mitchell as he delights us with a tour of the absurdities of modern life - from Ryanair to Downton Abbey, sports day to smoking, nuclear weapons to phone etiquette, UKIP to hotdogs made of cats. Funny, provocative and shot through with refreshing amounts of common sense, Thinking About It Only Makes It Worse celebrates and commiserates on the state of things in our not entirely glorious nation.

The Edge of the Sword [EPUB]

The Edge of the Sword [EPUB]
The Edge of the Sword: The Classic Account of Warfare and Captivity in Korea by Anthony Farrar-Hockley
2014 | EPUB | 8.6MB

In April 1951, at the height of the Korean War, Chinese troops advanced south of the 38th parallel towards a strategic crossing-point of the Imjin River on the invasion route to the South Korean capital of Seoul. The stand of the 1st Battalion, the Gloucestershire Regiment, against the overwhelming numbers of invading troops has since passed into British military history.

In The Edge of the Sword General Sir Anthony Farrar-Hockley, then Adjutant of the Glosters, has painted a vivid and accurate picture of the battle as seen by the officers and soldiers caught up in the middle of it. The book does not, however, end there. Like the majority of those who survived, the author became a prisoner-of-war, and the book continues with a remarkable account of his experiences in and out of Chinese prison camps.

This book is not an attempt at a personal hero-story, and it is certainly not a piece of political propaganda. It is, above all, an amazing story of human fortitude and high adventure.

How to Speak Money [Audiobook]

How to Speak Money [Audiobook]
How to Speak Money: What the Money People Say--And What It Really Means [Audiobook] by John Lanchester, read by Sean Pratt
2014 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB + MOBI | 9 hrs 59 mins | 274.6MB

An entertaining and indispensable guide to the language of finance and economics by the writer hailed for “explain[ing] complex stuff in a down-to-earth and witty style” (The Economist).

To those who don’t speak it, the language of money can seem impenetrable and its ideas too complex to grasp. In How to Speak Money, John Lanchester—author of the New York Times best-selling book on the financial crisis, I.O.U.—bridges the gap between the money people and the rest of us.

With characteristic wit and candor, Lanchester reveals how the world of finance really works: from the terms and conditions of your personal checking account to the evasions of bankers appearing in front of Congress. As Lanchester writes, we need to understand what the money people are talking about so that those who speak the language don’t just write the rules for themselves.

Lanchester explains more than 300 words and phrases from “AAA rating” and “amortization” to “yield curve” and “zombie bank.” He covers things we say or hear every day—such as GDP, the IMF, credit, debt, equity, and inflation—and explains how hedge funds work, what the World Bank does, and why the language of money has gotten so complicated. Along the way he draws on everything from John Maynard Keynes to the Wu-Tang Clan, Friedrich Hayek to Thomas Piketty, The Wealth of Nations to Game of Thrones.

A primer, a polemic, and a reference book, How to Speak Money makes economics understandable to anyone. After all, “money,” as Lanchester writes, “is a lot like babies, and once you know the language, the rule is the same as that put forward by Dr. Spock: ‘Trust yourself. You know more than you think you do.’”

In the Shadow of the Sword [Audiobook]

In the Shadow of the Sword [Audiobook]
In the Shadow of the Sword: The Battle for Global Empire and the End of the Ancient World [Audiobook] by Tom Holland, read by Jonathan Keeble
2012 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 17 hrs 50 mins | 490.41MB

The acclaimed author of Persian Fire and other superb works of popular history now produces a thrillingly panoramic (and incredibly timely) account of the rise of Islam.

No less significant than the collapse of the Roman Republic or the Persian invasion of Greece, the evolution of the Arab empire is one of the supreme narratives of ancient history, a story dazzlingly rich in drama, character, and achievement. Just like the Romans, the Arabs came from nowhere to carve out a stupefyingly vast dominion—except that they achieved their conquests not over the course of centuries as the Romans did but in a matter of decades. Just like the Greeks during the Persian wars, they overcame seemingly insuperable odds to emerge triumphant against the greatest empire of the day—not by standing on the defensive, however, but by hurling themselves against all who lay in their path.

Persian Fire [Audiobook]

Persian Fire [Audiobook]
Persian Fire: The First World Empire and the Battle for the West [Audiobook] by Tom Holland, read by Andrew Sachs
2005 | MP3@128 kbps + EPUB | 5 hrs 24 mins | 353.78MB

In 480 B.C., Xerxes, the King of Persia, led an invasion of mainland Greece. Its success should have been a formality. For seventy years, victory—rapid, spectacular victory—had seemed the birthright of the Persian Empire. In the space of a single generation, they had swept across the Near East, shattering ancient kingdoms, storming famous cities, putting together an empire which stretched from India to the shores of the Aegean. As a result of those conquests, Xerxes ruled as the most powerful man on the planet. Yet somehow, astonishingly, against the largest expeditionary force ever assembled, the Greeks of the mainland managed to hold out. The Persians were turned back. Greece remained free. Had the Greeks been defeated in the epochal naval battle at Salamis, not only would the West have lost its first struggle for independence and survival, but it is unlikely that there would ever have been such an entity as the West at all.

Tom Holland’s brilliant new book describes the very first “clash of Empires” between East and West. As he did in the critically praised Rubicon, he has found extraordinary parallels between the ancient world and our own. There is no other popular history that takes in the entire sweep of the Persian Wars, and no other classical historian, academic or popular, who combines scholarly rigor with novelistic depth with a worldly irony in quite the fashion that Tom Holland does.

Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic [Audiobook]

Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic [Audiobook]
Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic [Audiobook] by Tom Holland, read by Steven Crossley
2011 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 15 hrs 41 mins | 428.74MB

The Roman Republic was the most remarkable state in history. What began as a small community of peasants camped among marshes and hills ended up ruling the known world. Rubicon paints a vivid portrait of the Republic at the climax of its greatness - the same greatness which would herald the catastrophe of its fall.

It is a story of incomparable drama. This was the century of Julius Caesar, the gambler whose addiction to glory led him to the banks of the Rubicon, and beyond; of Cicero, whose defence of freedom would make him a byword for eloquence; of Spartacus, the slave who dared to challenge a superpower; of Cleopatra, the queen who did the same.

Tom Holland brings to life this strange and unsettling civilization, with its extremes of ambition and self-sacrifice, bloodshed and desire. Yet alien as it was, the Republic still holds up a mirror to us. Its citizens were obsessed by celebrity chefs, all-night dancing and exotic pets; they fought elections in law courts and were addicted to spin; they toppled foreign tyrants in the name of self-defence. Two thousand years may have passed, but we remain the Romans' heirs.

Millennium: The End of the World and the Forging of Christendom [EPUB]

Millennium: The End of the World and the Forging of Christendom [EPUB]
Millennium: The End of the World and the Forging of Christendom by Tom Holland
2011 | EPUB + MOBI | 2.32/1.42MB

Of all the civilisations existing in the year 1000, that of Western Europe seemed the unlikeliest candidate for future greatness. Compared to the glittering empires of Byzantium or Islam, the splintered kingdoms on the edge of the Atlantic appeared impoverished, fearful and backward. But the anarchy of these years proved to be, not the portents of the end of the world, as many Christians had dreaded, but rather the birthpangs of a radical new order.

MILLENNIUM is a stunning panoramic account of the two centuries on either side of the apocalyptic year 1000. This was the age of Canute, William the Conqueror and Pope Gregory VII, of Vikings, monks and serfs, of the earliest castles and the invention of knighthood, and of the primal conflict between church and state. The story of how the distinctive culture of Europe - restless, creative and dynamic - was forged from out of the convulsions of these extraordinary times is as fascinating and as momentous as any in history.

The Forge of Christendom [EPUB]

The Forge of Christendom [EPUB]
The Forge of Christendom: The End of Days and the Epic Rise of the West by Tom Holland
2009 | EPUB + MOBI | 2.3/9.88MB

At the approach of the first millennium, the Christians of Europe did not seem likely candidates for future greatness. Weak, fractured, and hemmed in by hostile nations, they saw no future beyond the widely anticipated Second Coming of Christ. But when the world did not end, the peoples of Western Europe suddenly found themselves with no choice but to begin the heroic task of building a Jerusalem on earth.

In The Forge of Christendom, Tom Holland masterfully describes this remarkable new age, a time of caliphs and Viking sea kings, the spread of castles and the invention of knighthood. It was one of the most significant departure points in history: the emergence of Western Europe as a distinctive and expansionist power.