Whitey Bulger: America's Most Wanted Gangster

Whitey Bulger: America's Most Wanted Gangster

Whitey Bulger: America's Most Wanted Gangster and the Manhunt That Brought Him to Justice by Kevin Cullen, Shelley Murphy
2013 | EPUB | 2.68MB

This unforgettable narrative follows the astonishing career and epic manhunt for Whitey Bulger—a gangster whose life was more sensational than fiction.

Raised in a South Boston housing project, James "Whitey" Bulger became the most wanted fugitive of his generation. In this riveting story, rich with family ties and intrigue, award-winning Boston Globe reporters Kevin Cullen and Shelley Murphy follow Whitey’s extraordinary criminal career—from teenage thievery to bank robberies to the building of his underworld empire and a string of brutal murders.

It was after a nine-year stint in Alcatraz and other prisons that Whitey reunited with his brother William "Billy" Bulger, who was soon to become one of Massachusetts’s most powerful politicians. He also became reacquainted with John Connolly, who had grown up around the corner from the Bulgers and was now—with Billy’s help—a rising star at the FBI.

Once Whitey emerged triumphant from the bloody Boston gang wars, Connolly recruited him as an informant against the Mafia. Their clandestine relationship made Whitey untouchable; the FBI overlooked gambling, drugs, and even homicide to protect their source. Among the close-knit Irish community in South Boston, nothing was more important than honor and loyalty, and nothing was worse than being a rat. Whitey is charged with the deaths of nineteen people killed over turf, for business, and even for being informants; yet to this day he denies he ever gave up his friends or landed anyone in jail.

Based on exclusive access and previously undisclosed documents, Cullen and Murphy explore the truth of the Whitey Bulger story. They reveal for the first time the extent of his two parallel family lives with different women, as well as his lifelong paranoia stemming in part from his experience in the CIA’s MKULTRA program. They describe his support of the IRA and his hitherto-unknown role in the Boston busing crisis, and they show a keen understanding of his mindset while on the lam and behind bars. The result is the first full portrait of this legendary criminal figure—a gripping story of wiseguys and cops, horrendous government malfeasance, and a sixteen-year manhunt that climaxed in Whitey’s dramatic capture in Santa Monica in June 2011.

Drawn to New York

Drawn to New York

Drawn to New York: An Illustrated Chronicle of Three Decades in New York City by Peter Kuper
2013 | EPUB | 14.62MB

A declaration of love to Peter Kuper’s adoptive city in which he has lived since 1977, this diary is a vibrant survey of New York City’s history. Through Kuper’s illustrations, this book depicts a climb to the top of the Brooklyn Bridge, the homeless living in Times Square, roller skaters in Central Park, the impact of September 11, the luxury of Wall Street, street musicians, and other scenes unique to the city.

With comics, illustrations, and sketches, this work of art portrays everything from the low life to the high energy that has long made people from around the world flock to the Big Apple.

Know What Makes Them Tick

Know What Makes Them Tick

Know What Makes Them Tick: How to Successfully Negotiate Almost Any Situation by Max Siegel, G F Lichtenberg
2010 | EPUB | 296.17KB

From highly innovative and successful business executive Max Siegel comes a straightforward and original self-help book that will give readers the upper hand in almost any kind of negotiation process.

Max Siegel started with none of the obvious advantages, yet again and again he built mutually beneficial partnerships--with peers, mentors, supervisors, and industry leaders--that took him to the heights of professional and personal achievement. He's managed some of the world's top recording artists, ballplayers, and race-car drivers, and helped run some of the top organizations in sports and entertainment. He's grown fragmented niche markets into bestselling audiences by tapping into the universal hopes and passions that bring people together. Now he travels the country giving motivational speeches and inspiring professionals of all kinds, sharing his method for connecting with people, whatever their differences.

The secret, Siegel says, is to know what makes others tick. For some, it's financial security; for others, it's respect, devotion to family, a creative calling, or a vision of a better world. He shows how to encourage people to share these hidden, all-important motivations, and how to partner with them in the most powerful way there is: by finding the overlap between their goals and yours, so that together you can realize the dreams that make you tick.

The nine universal rules outlined in Know What Makes Them Tick include: See Where You Want to Be, Not Where You Are Find Your Ambassadors Show What's in It for Them Readers will learn practical strategies for negotiating the challenges in every part of life, whether motivating colleagues to be more productive, finding a market for their product, uniting a divided family, or building a life of satisfaction in an unpredictable world. It's an eye-opening guide to a unique and powerful approach that anyone can use.

Empires, Nations, and Families

Empires, Nations, and Families

Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800-1860 by Anne F Hyde
2011 | AZW3 | 2.82MB

To most people living in the West, the Louisiana Purchase made little difference: the United States was just another imperial overlord to be assessed and manipulated. This was not, as Empires, Nations, and Families makes clear, virgin wilderness discovered by virtuous Anglo entrepreneurs. Rather, the United States was a newcomer in a place already complicated by vying empires. This book documents the broad family associations that crossed national and ethnic lines and that, along with the river systems of the trans-Mississippi West, formed the basis for a global trade in furs that had operated for hundreds of years before the land became part of the United States.

Empires, Nations, and Families shows how the world of river and maritime trade effectively shifted political power away from military and diplomatic circles into the hands of local people. Tracing family stories from the Canadian North to the Spanish and Mexican borderlands and from the Pacific Coast to the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, Anne F. Hyde’s narrative moves from the earliest years of the Indian trade to the Mexican War and the gold rush era. Her work reveals how, in the 1850s, immigrants to these newest regions of the United States violently wrested control from Native and other powers, and how conquest and competing demands for land and resources brought about a volatile frontier culture—not at all the peace and prosperity that the new power had promised.

Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass

Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass

Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass: The Story Behind an American Friendship by Russell Freedman
2012 | EPUB | 25.24MB

From the author of Lincoln: A Photobiography, comes a clear-sighted, carefully researched account of two surprisingly parallel lives and how they intersected at a critical moment in U.S. history.

Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were both selftaught, both great readers and believers in the importance of literacy, both men born poor who by their own efforts reached positions of power and prominence—Lincoln as president of the United States and Douglass as the most famous and influential African American of his time. Though their meetings were few and brief, their exchange of ideas helped to end the Civil War, reunite the nation, and abolish slavery.

Common Phrases And the Amazing Stories Behind Them

Common Phrases And the Amazing Stories Behind Them

Common Phrases And the Amazing Stories Behind Them by Max Cryer
2011 | EPUB | 1.04MB

In day-to-day speech we use words and phrases without a passing thought as to why we use them or where they come from. Max Cryer changes all that by showing how fascinating the English language really is. Did you know that the former host of Today, Jane Pauley, claims to have coined the term "bad hair day," or that a CBS engineer named Charley Douglass invented the name and use of "canned laughter" for television, or that "cold turkey" as a term for quitting something immediately was popularized by the novel and movie (starring Frank Sinatra), The Man with the Golden Arm?

Here you'll learn the origins of "credibility gap," "my lips are sealed," "the opera's not over until the fat lady sings," "supermarket," "supermodel," "there's no accounting for taste," "thick as thieves," and hundreds more. For anyone who loves language, this new book will "take the cake."

The Etymologicon [Audiobook]

The Etymologicon [Audiobook]

The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll through the Hidden Connections of the English Language [Audiobook] by Mark Forsyth
2012 | MP3@96 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 42 mins | 278.25MB

A quirky, entertaining and thought-provoking tour of the unexpected connections between words, read by Simon Shepherd. What is the actual connection between disgruntled and gruntled? What links church organs to organised crime, California to the Caliphate, or brackets to codpieces?

The Etymologicon springs from Mark Forsyth's Inky Fool blog on the strange connections between words. It's an occasionally ribald, frequently witty and unerringly erudite guided tour of the secret labyrinth that lurks beneath the English language, taking in monks and monkeys, film buffs and buffaloes, and explaining precisely what the Rolling Stones have to do with gardening.

The Analects of Confucius

The Analects of Confucius

The Analects of Confucius translated by Burton Watson
2009 | MOBI | 23.44MB

Compiled by disciples of Confucius in the centuries following his death in 479 B.C.E., The Analects of Confucius is a collection of aphorisms and historical anecdotes embodying the basic values of the Confucian tradition: learning, morality, ritual decorum, and filial piety. Reflecting the model eras of Chinese antiquity, the Analects offers valuable insights into successful governance and the ideal organization of society. Filled with humor and sarcasm, it reads like a casual conversation between teacher and student, emphasizing the role of the individual in the attainment of knowledge and the value of using historical events and people to illuminate moral and political concepts.

Confucius's teachings focus on cultural and peaceful pursuits and the characteristics of benevolent and culturally distinguished government. He also discusses ancestor worship and other rites performed for the spirits of the dead. The single most influential philosophical work in all of Chinese history, The Analects of Confucius has shaped the thought and customs of China and neighboring countries for centuries. Burton Watson's concise translation uses the pinyin romanization system and keeps explanatory notes to a minimum, yet his intimate knowledge of the Confucian tradition and precise attention to linguistic detail capture the original text's elegance, cogency, and wit.

Ho Chi Minh: A Life

Ho Chi Minh: A Life

Ho Chi Minh: A Life by William J Duiker
2001 | EPUB |

The magisterial and authoritative biography of one of the towering and mysterious figures of the twentieth century.

Ho Chi Minh's epic life helped shape the twentieth century. But never before has he been the subject of a major biography. Now William Duiker has compiled an astonishing work of history that fills this immense void.

A Story of Vietnam

A Story of Vietnam

A Story of Vietnam by Truong Buu Lam
2010 | AZW3 | 3.35MB

From the Author:

As a specialist of Southeast Asian History, I am often asked to introduce a book that would relate the history of Vietnam, from its beginnings to the present. As often, I am embarrassed to answer that there is no such book written in English. In effect, although we have many publications that deal competently with particular periods or systematically with different topics of its past, a comprehensive history of Vietnam is still lacking. That is the reason I am happy and humbled to introduce here A Story of Vietnam.

A Story of Vietnam treats evenly all the periods and also gives equal importance to the culture and the arts as to the political or military events of Vietnam's past. I call it a story and not a history, because I do not want my book to be the usual conventional textbook, overburdened with interminable academic, historical and bibliographic references.

While not a conventional textbook, A Story of Vietnam can, nonetheless, provide a substantial reading material to students interested in Asia. To the hyphenated Vietnamese, it can serve as a convenient reference tool to the historical allusions, cultural insinuations, mythical hints, literary suggestions, ethnic idiosyncrasies they encounter every day at home. This book may also be sought after by the people who know so much already about Vietnam as a War but who still would like to know more about Vietnam as a culture.

I have narrated my story with the greatest impartiality I am capable of. I have no theory that needs to be proven nor do I have any assumption to be verified. But I do come to history with emotion, even with passion. Sometimes, my sympathies surged to the surface or my distastes became apparent, though at no time, have I consciously distorted the facts or altered the documents in order to validate my feelings.

The ten chapters of this book are naturally of unequal length. They adhere strictly to the chronological order, meaning that Chapter One deals, among others, with the legendary origins of the Vietnamese people and the last chapter, Chapter Ten, recounts the social traumas, the economic hardships, and the political isolation the country experienced after reunification in 1975 to the remarkable recovery effected since 1986 and culminating in October of 2007 when Vietnam was elected as a non-permanent member of the Security Council of the United Nations.

The Numbers Game

The Numbers Game

The Numbers Game: The Commonsense Guide to Understanding Numbers in the News, in Politics, and in Life by Michael Blastland, Andrew Dilnot
2008 | EPUB | 412.11KB

The Strunk and White of statistics team up to help the average person navigate the numbers in the news.

Drawing on their hugely popular BBC Radio 4 show More or Less, journalist Michael Blastland and internationally known economist Andrew Dilnot delight, amuse, and convert American mathphobes by showing how our everyday experiences make sense of numbers.

The radical premise of The Numbers Game is to show how much we already know and give practical ways to use our knowledge to become cannier consumers of the media. If you've ever wondered what "average" really means, whether the scare stories about cancer risk should convince you to change your behavior, or whether a story you read in the paper is biased (and how), you need this book. Blastland and Dilnot show how to survive and thrive on the torrent of numbers that pours through everyday life.

Strange New Worlds

Strange New Worlds

Strange New Worlds: The Search for Alien Planets and Life Beyond Our Solar System by Ray Jayawardhana
2011 | EPUB | 3.67MB

We are living in an extraordinary age of discovery. After millennia of musings and a century of false claims, our knowledge of other worlds has suddenly exploded. Since 1995, astronomers have found hundreds of planets orbiting other stars— discoveries that have surprised us and challenged our views many times over. At the crux of the astronomers' pursuit is one basic question: Is our solar system, with planets in circular orbits, gas giants in the outer realm and at least one warm, wet, rocky world teeming with life, the exception or the norm? It's an important and timely question for every one of us. Astronomers expect to find alien earths by the dozens within the next few years and to examine them for telltale signs of life before this decade is out. If they succeed, the ramifications for all areas of human thought and endeavour— from religion and philosophy to art and biology— are profound, perhaps revolutionary. What's at stake is the true measure of our own place in the cosmos.

In Strange New Worlds, renowned astronomer Ray Jayawardhana offers an insider's look at the cutting-edge science of today's planet hunters, our prospects for discovering alien life, and the debates and controversies at the forefront of extra-solar planet research.

Psychogeography

Psychogeography

Psychogeography by Merlin Coverley
2010 | EPUB | 0.23MB

The term "psychogeography" is used to illustrate a bewildering array of ideas, from ley lines and the occult to urban walking and political radicalism—where does it come from and what exactly does it mean?

Psychogeography is the point where psychology and geography meet in assessing the emotional and behavioral impact of urban space. The relationship between a city and its inhabitants is measured firstly through an imaginative and literary response, secondly on foot through walking the city. This creates a tradition of the writer as walker and has both a literary and a political component. This guide examines the origins of psychogeography in the Situationist Movement of the 1950s, exploring the theoretical background and its political applications as well as the work of early practitioners such as Guy Debord and Raoul Vaneigem. Elsewhere, psychogeographic ideas continue to find retrospective validation in much earlier traditions from the visionary writing of William Blake and Thomas De Quincey to the rise of the flâneur on the streets of 19th century Paris and on through the avant-garde experimentation of the Surrealists. These precursors are discussed here alongside their modern counterparts, for today these ideas hold greater currency than ever through the popularity of writers and filmmakers such as Iain Sinclair and Peter Ackroyd, Stewart Home and Patrick Keiller.

This guide offers both an explanation and definition of the terms involved, an analysis of the key figures and their work, and practical information on psychogeographical groups and organizations.

Man and His Symbols

Man and His Symbols

Man and His Symbols by C G Jung
1968 | EPUB | 15.18MB

Illustrated throughout with revealing images, this is the first and only work in which the world-famous Swiss psychologist explains to the layperson his enormously influential theory of symbolism as revealed in dreams.

Awakening the Heroes Within

Awakening the Heroes Within

Awakening the Heroes Within: Twelve Archetypes to Help Us Find Ourselves and Transform Our World by Carol S Pearson
1991 | EPUB | 1.06MB

"The heroic quest is about saying 'yes' to yourself and in doing so doing, becoming more fully alive and more effective in the world…The quest is replete with dangers and pitfalls, but it offers great rewards: the capacity to be successful in the world, knowledge of the mysteries of the human soul, and the opportunity to find and express your unique gifts in the world".

In this bold and original work, Carol S. Pearson shows that the heroic quest isn't just for certain people under special circumstances. Exploring the many heroic paths available to each of us, at every point in our lives, her innovative program enables us to live heroically by activating and applying twelve archetypes in our lives.

This companion to the best-selling The Hero Within outlines twelve archetypal patterns that can aid inner development and the quest for wholeness.

These archetypes are inner guides that can help us:

  • prepare for the journey, by learning how to become successful members of society
  • embark upon the quest, by becoming initiated into the mysteries of the human soul; and
  • return to transform our lives as a result of claiming our uniqueness and personal power

Writing for individuals seeking to realise their full potential and professionals engaged in empowering others, Pearson shows how journeys differ by the age, gender, and cultural background of the seeker, and how archetypes help awaken the capacities of our psyches. A unique diagnostic test, the Heroic Myth Index, and exercises are included to help us understand and awaken our inner guides.

The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime

The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime

The Anatomy of Violence: The Biological Roots of Crime by Adrian Raine
2013 | EPUB | 4.63MB

Why do some innocent kids grow up to become cold-blooded serial killers? Is bad biology partly to blame? For more than three decades Adrian Raine has been researching the biological roots of violence and establishing neurocriminology, a new field that applies neuroscience techniques to investigate the causes and cures of crime. In The Anatomy of Violence, Raine dissects the criminal mind with a fascinating, readable, and far-reaching scientific journey into the body of evidence that reveals the brain to be a key culprit in crime causation.

Raine documents from genetic research that the seeds of sin are sown early in life, giving rise to abnormal physiological functioning that cultivates crime. Drawing on classical case studies of well-known killers in history—including Richard Speck, Ted Kaczynski, and Henry Lee Lucas—Raine illustrates how impairments to brain areas controlling our ability to experience fear, make good decisions, and feel guilt predispose us to violence. He contends that killers can actually be coldhearted: something as simple as a low resting heart rate can give rise to violence. But arguing that biology is not destiny, he also sketches out provocative new biosocial treatment approaches that can change the brain and prevent violence.

Finally, Raine tackles the thorny legal and ethical dilemmas posed by his research, visualizing a futuristic brave new world where our increasing ability to identify violent offenders early in life might shape crime-prevention policies, for good and bad. Will we sacrifice our notions of privacy and civil rights to identify children as potential killers in the hopes of helping both offenders and victims? How should we punish individuals with little to no control over their violent behavior? And should parenting require a license? The Anatomy of Violence offers a revolutionary appraisal of our understanding of criminal offending, while also raising provocative questions that challenge our core human values of free will, responsibility, and punishment.

The Real North Korea

The Real North Korea

The Real North Korea: Life and Politics in the Failed Stalinist Utopia by Andrei Lankov
2013 | EPUB | 1.97MB

Andrei Lankov has gone where few outsiders have ever been. A native of the former Soviet Union, he lived as an exchange student in North Korea in the 1980s. He has studied it for his entire career, using his fluency in Korean and personal contacts to build a rich, nuanced understanding.

In The Real North Korea, Lankov substitutes cold, clear analysis for the overheated rhetoric surrounding this opaque police state. After providing an accessible history of the nation, he turns his focus to what North Korea is, what its leadership thinks, and how its people cope with living in such an oppressive and poor place. He argues that North Korea is not irrational, and nothing shows this better than its continuing survival against all odds. A living political fossil, it clings to existence in the face of limited resources and a zombie economy, manipulating great powers despite its weakness. Its leaders are not ideological zealots or madmen, but perhaps the best practitioners of Machiavellian politics that can be found in the modern world. Even though they preside over a failed state, they have successfully used diplomacy-including nuclear threats-to extract support from other nations. But while the people in charge have been ruthless and successful in holding on to power, Lankov goes on to argue that this cannot continue forever, since the old system is slowly falling apart. In the long run, with or without reform, the regime is unsustainable. Lankov contends that reforms, if attempted, will trigger a dramatic implosion of the regime. They will not prolong its existence.

Based on vast expertise, this book reveals how average North Koreans live, how their leaders rule, and how both survive.

Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror

Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror

Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror by Matthew M Aid
2013 | EPUB | 2.13MB

The United States intelligence establishment is a colossus. With stations in 170 countries, armed with cutting-edge surveillance gear, high-tech weapons, and fleets of armed and unarmed drone aircraft, it commands the most extensive and advanced intel force in history. But America's spy establishment still struggles to keep pace with a host of determined enemies around the world.

In Intel Wars, leading espionage historian Matthew M. Aid delivers the inside stories of our decade-long struggle against terrorism-its hard-won successes and bedeviling failures.

Based on extensive, on-the-ground interviews on the front lines and in D.C., as well as revelations from Wikileaks cables and other newly declassified documents, Intel Wars is the most authoritative account yet written of the secret war that America is still fighting.

Prepper's Guide to Surviving Natural Disasters

Prepper's Guide to Surviving Natural Disasters

Prepper's Guide to Surviving Natural Disasters: How to Prepare for Real-World Emergencies by James D Nowka
2013 | EPUB | 8.11MB

Real disasters - floods, fires, tornadoes, hurricanes, chemical spills - occur every year. Prepper's Guide to Natural Disasters skips the hype and hysteria of less likely, apocalyptic scenarios and helps you understand, prepare for, and survive real threats to your family and home - events that affect hundreds of thousands of people every year.

The Prepper's Guide to Natural Disasters helps you assess the real threats in your part of the country, then provides clear, detailed solutions to help you prepare for and survive these events.

A Long Walk in the Himalaya

A Long Walk in the Himalaya

A Long Walk in the Himalaya: A Trek from the Ganges to Kashmir by Garry Weare
2011 | MOBI | 1.54MB

Garry Weare is enigmatic, funny and he has an enormous conscience. He brings into the story of his Himalayan traverse a succession of vignettes about people's lives that he meets along the way, relevant history, natural history observations and a delightful sprinkling of his inimitable sense of humour. The warmth of his relationships with his old Kashmiri friends and various people from the trekking fraternity adds a wonderful dimension to this journeyman's tale.

Weare's finely rendered story of his five-month trek from the sacred source of the Ganges through the Kullu Valley, Zanskar and Ladakh to his houseboat in Kashmir is remarkably entertaining. The people he meets and travels with are fully-fledged characters that the reader comes to know and care about while the Himalaya, captured in all their variety, cast their spell. It is as if the act of walking allows the author to fully understand all the nuances – spiritual, environmental, social and political – of this inspiring region. A Long Walk in the Himalaya is a book to savour, a book that the reader will return to again and again.

The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari

The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari

The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari by Paul Theroux
2013 | EPUB | 2.61MB

Following the success of the acclaimed Ghost Train to the Eastern Star and The Great Railway Bazaar, The Last Train to Zona Verde is an ode to the last African journey of the world's most celebrated travel writer.

“Happy again, back in the kingdom of light,” writes Paul Theroux as he sets out on a new journey through the continent he knows and loves best. Theroux first came to Africa as a twenty-two-year-old Peace Corps volunteer, and the pull of the vast land never left him. Now he returns, after fifty years on the road, to explore the little-traveled territory of western Africa and to take stock both of the place and of himself.

His odyssey takes him northward from Cape Town, through South Africa and Namibia, then on into Angola, wishing to head farther still until he reaches the end of the line. Journeying alone through the greenest continent, Theroux encounters a world increasingly removed from both the itineraries of tourists and the hopes of postcolonial independence movements. Leaving the Cape Town townships, traversing the Namibian bush, passing the browsing cattle of the great sunbaked heartland of the savanna, Theroux crosses “the Red Line” into a different Africa: “the improvised, slapped-together Africa of tumbled fences and cooking fires, of mud and thatch,” of heat and poverty, and of roadblocks, mobs, and anarchy. After 2,500 arduous miles, he comes to the end of his journey in more ways than one, a decision he chronicles with typically unsparing honesty in a chapter called “What Am I Doing Here?”

Vivid, witty, and beautifully evocative, The Last Train to Zona Verde is a fitting final African adventure from the writer whose gimlet eye and effortless prose have brought the world to generations of readers.

The Professor, the Banker, and the Suicide King

The Professor, the Banker, and the Suicide King
The Professor, the Banker, and the Suicide King by Michael Craig
2005 | EPUB | 303.7KB

The Constitution of Liberty

The Constitution of Liberty

The Constitution of Liberty: The Collected Works of Friedrich A Hayek
2011 | EPUB | 891.09KB

From the 700 billion dollars bailout of the banking industry to president Barack Obama's 787 billion dollars stimulus package to the highly controversial passage of federal health-care reform, conservatives and concerned citizens alike have grown increasingly fearful of big government. Enter Nobel Prize-winning economist and political theorist F. A. Hayek, whose passionate warning against empowering states with greater economic control, The Road to Serfdom, became an overnight sensation last summer when it was endorsed by Glenn Beck. The book has since sold over 150,000 copies.

The latest entry in the University of Chicago Press's series of newly edited editions of Hayek's works, The Constitution of Liberty is, like Serfdom, just as relevant to our present moment. The book is considered Hayek's classic statement on the ideals of freedom and liberty, ideals that he believes have guided--and must continue to guide--the growth of Western civilization. Here Hayek defends the principles of a free society, casting a skeptical eye on the growth of the welfare state and examining the challenges to freedom posed by an ever expanding government--as well as its corrosive effect on the creation, preservation, and utilization of knowledge. In opposition to those who call for the state to play a greater role in society, Hayek puts forward a nuanced argument for prudence. Guided by this quality, he elegantly demonstrates that a free market system in a democratic polity--under the rule of law and with strong constitutional protections of individual rights--represents the best chance for the continuing existence of liberty.

Striking a balance between skepticism and hope, Hayek's profound insights are timelier and more welcome than ever before. This definitive edition of The Constitution of Liberty will give a new generation the opportunity to learn from his enduring wisdom.

Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist

Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist

Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist by Alexander Berkman
1920 | EPUB | 880.96KB

In 1892, Alexander Berkman, Russian émigré, anarchist, and lover of Emma Goldman, attempted to assassinate industrialist Henry Clay Frick. The act was intended both as retribution for the massacre of workers in the Homestead strike and as an incitement to revolution. Captured and sentenced to serve a prison term of twenty-two years, Berkman struggled to make sense of the shadowy and brutalized world of the prison—one that hardly conformed to revolutionary expectation.

War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents

War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents

War and the World: Military Power and the Fate of Continents, 1450-2000 by Jeremy Black
1998 | EPUB | 851.88KB

An attempt to write a global history of warfare in the modern era. Jeremy Black, here presents a wide-ranging account of the nature, purpose and experience of war over the last half millennium. Investigating both land and sea warfare, Black examines weaponry, tactics, strategy and resources as well as the political, social and cultural impact of conflict. He takes issue with established interpretations, not least those that emphasize technology, and directly challenges the view that European military and naval forces were dominant throughout the period. European mastery at sea did not inevitably translate into equivalent success on land, he argues, and indeed many non-European military systems were formidable in their own right.

Black investigates the regional political military inpact of, for example, Babur and the Mughals in 16th-century India and the Manchu conquest of China in the following century. The book argues that, in the 18th century - the focal point of Europe's military revolution - the international military balance shifted decisively. Economic growth and maritime exploration turned navies into aggressively effective instruments of power and fuelled the obsession for territorial acquisition which dominated the great powers throughout the 19th century.

Linking debates on early modern history with those of more recent centuries, "War and the World" should be reading for students of global history and constitutes a re-examination of the role of war in the progress of nations.

Stalin's General: The Life of Georgy Zhukov

Stalin's General: The Life of Georgy Zhukov

Stalin's General: The Life of Georgy Zhukov by Geoffrey Roberts
2012 | EPUB | 7.02MB

Widely regarded as the most accomplished general of World War II, the Soviet military legend Marshal Georgy Zhukov at last gets the full-scale biographical treatment he has long deserved.

A man of indomitable will and fierce determination, Georgy Zhukov was the Soviet Union’s indispensable commander through every one of the critical turning points of World War II. It was Zhukov who saved Leningrad from capture by the Wehrmacht in September 1941, Zhukov who led the defense of Moscow in October 1941, Zhukov who spearheaded the Red Army’s march on Berlin and formally accepted Germany’s unconditional surrender in the spring of 1945. Drawing on the latest research from recently opened Soviet archives, including the uncensored versions of Zhukov’s own memoirs, Roberts offers a vivid portrait of a man whose tactical brilliance was matched only by the cold-blooded ruthlessness with which he pursued his battlefield objectives.

After the war, Zhukov was a key player on the geopolitical scene. As Khrushchev’s defense minister, he was one of the architects of Soviet military strategy during the Cold War. While lauded in the West as a folk hero—he was the only Soviet general ever to appear on the cover of Time magazine—Zhukov repeatedly ran afoul of the Communist political authorities. Wrongfully accused of disloyalty, he was twice banished and erased from his country’s official history—left out of books and paintings depicting Soviet World War II victories. Piercing the hyperbole of the Zhukov personality cult, Roberts debunks many of the myths that have sprung up around Zhukov’s life and career to deliver fresh insights into the marshal’s relationships with Stalin, Khrushchev, and Eisenhower.

A remarkably intimate portrait of a man whose life was lived behind an Iron Curtain of official secrecy, Stalin’s General is an authoritative biography that restores Zhukov to his rightful place in the twentieth-century military pantheon.

The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy [Audiobook]

The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy [Audiobook]

The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944 [Audiobook] by Rick Atkinson
2007 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 10 hrs 16 mins | 280.93MB

In An Army at Dawn, Rick Atkinson, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, provided a dramatic and authoritative history of the Allied triumph in North Africa. Now, in The Day of Battle, he follows the strengthening American and British armies as they invade Sicily in July 1943 and then, mile by bloody mile, fight their way north toward Rome.

The Italian campaign's outcome was never certain; in fact, Roosevelt, Churchill, and their military advisers engaged in heated debate about whether an invasion of the so-called soft underbelly of Europe was even a good idea. But once under way, the commitment to liberate Italy from the Nazis never wavered, despite the agonizingly high price. The battles at Salerno, Anzio, and Monte Cassino were particularly difficult and lethal, yet as the months passed, the Allied forces continued to drive the Germans up the Italian peninsula. Led by Lieutenant General Mark Clark, one of the war's most complex and controversial commanders, American officers and soldiers became increasingly determined and proficient. And with the liberation of Rome in June 1944, ultimate victory at last began to seem inevitable.

Drawing on a wide array of primary source material, written with great drama and flair, this is narrative history of the first rank. With The Day of Battle, Atkinson has once again given us the definitive account of one of history's most compelling military campaigns.

On to Victory: The Canadian Liberation of the Netherlands

On to Victory: The Canadian Liberation of the Netherlands

On to Victory: The Canadian Liberation of the Netherlands, March 23 - May 5, 1945 [Audiobook] by Mark Zuehlke
2012 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 16 hrs 19 mins | 448.19MB

It is remembered in the Netherlands as "the sweetest of springs", the one that saw the country's liberation from German occupation. But for the soldiers of First Canadian army, who fought their way across the Rhine River and then through Holland and northwest Germany, that spring of 1945 was bittersweet. While the Dutch were being liberated from the grinding boot heel of the Nazis, their freedom was being paid for in Canadian lives lost.

On to Victory is the story of those final cruel days of the war. From the brutal battlefields of Holland and northwest Germany where a collapsing enemy army still fought with fierce determination, to the unique truce in which the Germans and Allies provided food to millions of Dutch citizens starved almost to death, to those heady moments when each town and city was finally liberated, this is the little-told story of First Canadian Army's last campaign of World War II. With his trademark "you are there" style that draws upon official records, veteran memories, and a keen understanding of the experience of combat, Mark Zuehlke brings to life this final chapter in the story of Canada in World War II.

Operation Husky: The Canadian Invasion of Sicily [Audiobook]

Operation Husky: The Canadian Invasion of Sicily [Audiobook]

Operation Husky: The Canadian Invasion of Sicily, July 10 - August 7, 1943 [Audiobook] by Mark Zuehlke
2012 | MP3@96 kbps + EPUB | 16 hrs 01 min | 660.2MB

On July 10, 1943, two great Allied armadas of over 2,000 ships readied to invade Sicily. This was Operation Husky, the first step toward winning a toehold in fascist-occupied Europe. Among the invaders were 20,000 Canadian troops serving in the First Canadian Infantry Division and First Canadian Tank Brigade — in their first combat experience. Over the next 28 days, the Allied troops carved a path through the rugged land, despite fierce German opposition.

Drawing on firsthand accounts of veterans and official military records, Operation Husky offers a gripping, meticulous account of this seminal operation and the young men who fought, died, and survived it.

The Liri Valley: Canada's World War II Breakthrough to Rome

The Liri Valley: Canada's World War II Breakthrough to Rome

The Liri Valley: Canada's World War II Breakthrough to Rome [Audiobook] by Mark Zuehlke
2012 | MP3@64 kbps | 17 hrs 30 mins | 480.74MB

The second instalment in military historian Mark Zuehlke’s compelling World War II tales of Canadians overcoming insurmountable odds in Italy.

For the allied armies fighting their way up the Italian boot in early 1944, Rome was the prize that could only be won through one of the greatest offensives of the war. Following upon his book about the battle of Ortona, Mark Zuehlke returns to the Mediterranean theatre of World War II with this gripping tribute to the valiant Canadians who opened the way for the Allies to take Rome.

The Liri Valley is testament to the bravery of these Canadians, like the badly wounded Captain Pierre Potvin, who survived more than thirty hours alone in the hell of no man’s land. This book, like the battle it records, will live long in readers’ memories.

Ortona: Canada's Epic World War II Battle [Audiobook]

Ortona: Canada's Epic World War II Battle [Audiobook]

Ortona: Canada's Epic World War II Battle [Audiobook] by Mark Zuehlke
2012 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 14 hrs 53 mins | 408.9MB

In one furious week of fighting in December 1943, the First Canadian Infantry Division took Ortona, Italy, from elite German paratroopers ordered to hold the medieval port at all costs. When the battle was over, the Canadians emerged victorious despite heavy losses. Over 2,500 Canadians died or were wounded there.

Military historian Mark Zuehlke blends reminiscences of the Canadians, Germans, and Italians who were there together with a blow-by-blow account of the fighting to create a harrowing, ultimately hopeful rendering of one of World War II's defining moments.

Juno Beach: Canada's D-Day Victory: June 6, 1944 [Audiobook]

Juno Beach: Canada's D-Day Victory: June 6, 1944 [Audiobook]

Juno Beach: Canada's D-Day Victory: June 6, 1944 [Audiobook] by Mark Zuehlke
2005 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 14 hrs 02 mins | 385.46MB

From Canada’s most accomplished military historian of the Second World War comes a book about the most important battle in the European theatre. Drawing on personal diaries as well as military records, Juno Beach: Canada’s D-Day Victory—June 6, 1944 dramatically depicts Canada’s pivotal contribution to the most critical Allied battle of World War II.

On June 6, 1944, the greatest armada in history stood off Normandy and the largest amphibious invasion ever began as 107,000 men aboard 6,000 ships pressed toward the coast. Among this number were 18,000 Canadians, who were to land on a five-mile-long stretch of rocky ledges fronted by a wide expanse of sand code named Juno Beach.

At battle’s end one out of every six Canadians in the invasion force was either dead or wounded. Yet their grip on Juno Beach was firm. The Canadians had the toughest assignment but remarkably was the only Allied troop to meet its objectives.

On the sixtieth anniversary of the battle, Juno Beach offers a compelling account of the war that changed the course of modern history.