The Economist Audio Edition [June 29, 2013]

The Economist Audio Edition [June 29, 2013]

The Economist Audio Edition [June 29, 2013]
English | MP3@48 kbps + EPUB + MOBI | 7 hrs 10 mins | 150.03MB

The audio edition contains word-for-word recordings of all articles published in The Economist, read by professional broadcasters and actors. It is ideal for anyone who wants to listen to articles while travelling, exercising or just relaxing.

The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by "The Economist Newspaper Ltd" and edited in London. It has been in continuous publication since James Wilson established it in September 1843. As of summer 2007, its average circulation topped 1.2 million copies a week, about half of which are sold in North America. Consequently it is often seen as a transatlantic (as opposed to solely British) news source.

The aim of The Economist is "to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress."Subjects covered include international news, economics, politics, business, finance, science, technology, and the arts. The publication is targeted at the high-end "prestige" segment of the market and counts among its audience influential business and government decision-makers.

It takes a strongly argued editorial stance on many issues, especially its support for free trade and fiscal conservatism; it can thus be considered as a magazine which practises advocacy journalism.

Although The Economist calls itself a newspaper and refers to its staff as correspondents, it is printed in magazine form on glossy paper, like a newsmagazine.

Articles in this issue:

  • The protests around the world: The march of protest
  • Chinas cash crunch: Bear in the China shop
  • Teaching and technology: E-ducation
  • Justice and the armed forces in Pakistan: The general in the dock
  • Climate-change policy in America, Europe and China: Tepid, timid
  • European Union enlargement: Keeping up with the Croats
  • Letters: On Iran, coastal homes, Mexico City, PRISM, London, publishing, bosses, Newcastle
  • Education technology: Catching on at last
  • Gay marriage: Windsors knot
  • The Supreme Court: Equality, debated
  • Abortion: Ms Davis goes to Austin
  • Immigration: A big wall of money
  • Agriculture: Stuffed
  • Greetings cards: The American way of death
  • Climate change: While Congress sleeps
  • Lexington: Above the fray, but part of it
  • Lexington: Correction
  • Brazils protests: The cries are answered
  • Economic reform in Cuba: A private affair
  • Sexism in Canadas Mounties: The wild frontier
  • Australian politics: We need to talk about Kevinagain
  • Mongolias presidential election: Elbegdorj scrapes home
  • Protest in India: The little man
  • Floods in India: High and wet
  • South-East Asias smog: Unspontaneous combustion
  • Banyan: So near, and yet
  • Financial reforms: Re-education through Shibor
  • Political balancing: Mixed messages
  • Economic decision-makers: Take a bow
  • The African National Congress: A sad and sorry decline
  • Zimbabwes coming election: The spirit of wrath is upon us
  • Libyas opposition: Where green refuses to fade
  • Islams old schism: Sunnis v Shias, here and there
  • Qatars new emir: A hard act to follow
  • Crisis in Egypt: More worrying than ever
  • Germany in the world: The occasional leader
  • Italian politics: More trouble ahead
  • French political scandals: Tapping along
  • Turkeys protests: Still out on the streets
  • Portugal and the euro: Floundering on
  • Albanias election: Edis turn
  • Charlemagne: Europes new frontier
  • Exporting to China: Eastward march
  • Immigration: Your money is your bond
  • The spending review: The subtle knife
  • Legal aid: What price justice?
  • BBC Worldwide: Cut-throat or cuddly?
  • Reviving a troubled town: Bits and bobs
  • Bagehot: The little party behind the throne
  • Secrecy: Travels and travails
  • Internet protests: The digital demo
  • Prosperity and protest: Cry freedom
  • European telecoms: In a hole
  • Corporate computing: Ascending to the cloud
  • Housebuilders in America: Through the roof again?
  • The empire of Eike Batista: Eikes breaky heart
  • The higher-education business: Honours without profits?
  • Hospital operators and Obamacare: Prescription for change
  • German business and English: No Denglisch
  • Schumpeter: Spooked by shale
  • Indias economy: Start me up
  • Buttonwood: Cut off by their sugar daddy
  • Mexicos financial markets: Rolling with the punches
  • Banks and interest rates: Administer with care
  • Mediobanca: A little less tangled
  • Defining financial bigotry: Disparate times
  • Free exchange: Levying the land
  • Driverless automobiles: The car that parks itself
  • Stopping asteroid strikes: Defenders of the Earth
  • Cancer and the microbiome: A punch in the gut
  • Art and the animal kingdom: Of mice and Manet
  • Indian development: Beyond bootstraps
  • Cyber-warfare: Digital doomsters
  • Economic history: A sketch, not a portrait
  • Solitude: Sweet spot
  • Latin verse: In praise of poetry
  • The art of Meschac Gaba: Making space
  • The art of Meschac Gaba: Correction: Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • Lancelote Rodrigues
  • Output, prices and jobs
  • Trade, exchange rates, budget balances and interest rates
  • The Economist commodity-price index
  • Foreign direct investment
  • Markets

Fatal Females: 13 Cases That Gripped a Nation

Fatal Females: 13 Cases That Gripped a Nation

Fatal Females: 13 Cases That Gripped a Nation by Libby-Jane Charleston
2013 | EPUB | 1.74MB

Women are supposed to be tender and loving – not cold-hearted killers, knife-wielding vampires or gun-toting hijackers. Yet throughout history, there's been no shortage of less than law-abiding ladies.

Let journalist Libby-Jane Charleston take you on a chilling journey through a true crime gallery of women who have smashed our perceptions of the stereotypical feminine persona: from meek Russian librarian Lucy Dudko, who commandeered a helicopter to break her boyfriend out of prison; to suburban sex goddess Michelle Burgess, who hired a hit man to take out her lover's wife; and Katherine Knight, who killed, skinned and cooked her partner to serve to his children.

Read these true stories and delve into the dark and disturbing lives of Australia's most fatal females.

The Casebook of Forensic Detection

The Casebook of Forensic Detection

The Casebook of Forensic Detection: How Science Solved 100 of the World's Most Baffling Crimes by Colin Evans
2007 | EPUB | 5.52MB

Updated with new material, this collection vividly depicts the horrendous crimes, colorful detectives, and grueling investigations that shaped the science of forensics. In concise, fascinating detail, Colin Evans shows how far forensic science has come from Sherlock Holmes's magnifying glass.

No crime in this book is ordinary, and many of the perpetrators are notorious: Ted Bundy, John Wayne Gacy, John List, Bruno Hauptmann, Jeffrey Macdonald, and Wayne Williams among others. Along with the cases solved, fifteen forensic techniques are covered- including fingerprinting, ballistics, toxicology, DNA analysis, and psychological profiling, methods that have increased the odds that today's technosleuths will get the bad guys, clear the innocent-and bring justice to the victims and their families.

The Forensic Casebook

The Forensic Casebook

The Forensic Casebook: The Science of Crime Scene Investigation by Ngaire E Genge
2002 | EPUB | 2.15MB

THE ULTIMATE READERS’ GUIDE TO THE ART OF FORENSICS!

An intrepid investigator crawls through miles of air conditioning ducts to capture the implicating fibers of a suspect’s wool jacket . . . A forensic entomologist discovers insects in the grill of a car and nails down a drug dealer’s precise geographical path . . . A gluttonous criminal’s fingerprints are lifted from a chocolate truffle. . . .

Filled with these and many other intriguing true stories, and packed with black and white illustrations and photographs, The Forensic Casebook draws on interviews with police personnel and forensic scientists—including animal examiners, botanists, zoologists, firearms specialists, and autoposists—to uncover the vast and detailed underworkings of criminal investigation. Encyclopedic in scope, this riveting, authoritative book leaves no aspect of forensic science untouched, covering such fascinating topics as:

  • Securing a crime scene
  • Identifying blood splatter patterns
  • Collecting fingerprints—and feet, lip, and ear prints
  • Interpreting the stages of a body’s decay
  • Examining hair and fiber evidence
  • Trace evidence from firearms and explosives
  • “Lifting” DNA prints
  • Computer crime and forensic photography
  • Career paths in criminal science

Lucidly written and spiked with real crime stories, The Forensic Casebook exposes the nitty gritty that other books only touch upon. Here is a reference book as addictive as a page-turning novel of suspense.

Early Mapping of the Pacific

Early Mapping of the Pacific

Early Mapping of the Pacific: The Epic Story of Seafarers, Adventurers, and Cartographers Who Mapped the Earth's Greatest Ocean by Thomas Suarez
2013 | EPUB | 45.15MB

290 full-color and b&w maps and early prints. Fully illustrated history of the Pacific Ocean from Portuguese mariners to 20th centuy explorers that includes a cornucopia of rare and beautiful maps of the Pacific Ocean, in particular, Hawaii, Tahiti, Australia, and New Zealand, among other Pacific Islands and territories. The text traces the exploration, and charting of the great ocean, and follows the story from classical times through the turn of the 20th century, telling the tales of seafarers who ventured eastward from Asia and were the Pacific's greatest explorers.

Don't Know Much About Geography [Audiobook]

Don't Know Much About Geography [Audiobook]

Don't Know Much About Geography: Everything You Need to Know about the World but Never Learned (Revised and Updated Edition) [Audiobook] by Kenneth C Davis
2013 | MP3@64 kbps | 12 hrs 46 mins | 351.02MB

Don't Know Much About Geography by New York Times bestselling author Kenneth C. Davis is a fascinating and fun exploration of our planet.

Geography is the hub from which other disciplines radiate: meteorology, ecology, geology, oceanography, demographics, cartography, agricultural studies, economics, and political science.

In addition to presenting geographical trivia that’ll impress your friends, Davis explores 21st-century topics of global concern, including the role of the Internet and technology in transforming the lives of people around the world, how so-called developing nations develop, sustainability, and the debates over climate change and evolutionary science.

This completely revised and updated version of Don't Know Much About Geography is an entertaining and illuminating grand tour of planet Earth.

Here Is Where: Discovering America's Great Forgotten History

Here Is Where: Discovering America's Great Forgotten History

Here Is Where: Discovering America's Great Forgotten History [Audiobook] by Andrew Carroll
2013 | MP3@160 kbps | 14 hrs 02 mins | 963.8MB

The centerpiece of a major national campaign to indentify and preserve forgotten history, Here Is Where is acclaimed historian Andrew Carroll’s fascinating journey of discovery in which he travels to each of America’s fifty states and explores locations where remarkable individuals once lived or where the incredible or momentous occurred.

Sparking the idea for this audiobook was Carroll’s visit to the spot where Abraham Lincoln’s son was once saved by the brother of Lincoln’s assassin. Carroll wondered, How many other unmarked places are there where intriguing events unfolded -- or where extraordinary men and women made their mark? And then it came to him: the idea of spotlighting great hidden history by traveling the length and breadth of the United States, searching for buried historical treasure.

In Here Is Where, Carroll drives, flies, boats, hikes, kayaks and trains into the past, and in so doing, uncovers stories that inspire thoughtful contemplation, occasional hilarity and often, awe. Among the things we learn:

  • Where the oldest sample of DNA in North America was discovered
  • Which obscure American scientist saved 400 million lives
  • Which famous FBI agent was the brother of a notorious gangster
  • Which cemetery contains one million graves – but only one marked
  • How a 14 year old boy invented television

Featured prominently in Here Is Where are an abundance of firsts (including the first elevator, the first modern anesthesia, the first cremation, and the first murder conviction based on forensic evidence), outrages (from massacres, to forced sterilizations, to kidnappings) and breakthroughs (from the invention of the M-1 carbine to the recovery of the last existing sample of Spanish Flu to the building of the rocket that made possible space travel).

A profound reminder that the ground we walk is often the top sedimentary layer of amazing past events, Here Is Where represents just the first step in an ongoing project that will recruit citizen historians to preserve what should be remembered.

The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King

The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King

The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King--The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea by Walter R Borneman
2012 | EPUB | 5.49MB

How history's only five-star admirals triumphed in World War II and made the United States the world's dominant sea power.

Only four men in American history have been promoted to the five-star rank of Admiral of the Fleet: William Leahy, Ernest King, Chester Nimitz, and William Halsey. These four men were the best and the brightest the navy produced, and together they led the U.S. navy to victory in World War II, establishing the United States as the world's greatest fleet.

In THE ADMIRALS, award-winning historian Walter R. Borneman tells their story in full detail for the first time. Drawing upon journals, ship logs, and other primary sources, he brings an incredible historical moment to life, showing us how the four admirals revolutionized naval warfare forever with submarines and aircraft carriers, and how these men-who were both friends and rivals-worked together to ensure that the Axis fleets lay destroyed on the ocean floor at the end of World War II.

Patton: The Man Behind the Legend, 1885-1945 [Audiobook]

Patton: The Man Behind the Legend, 1885-1945 [Audiobook]

Patton: The Man Behind the Legend, 1885-1945 [Audiobook] by Martin Blumenson
1999 | MP3@64 kbps | 8 hrs 33 mins | 233.64MB

This magnificent biography by the world's foremost expert on the life of George S. Patton portrays the many faces of the general with uncompromising insight: the gruff, demanding public front known (and feared) by millions; the sensitive, intellectual visage shown to intimates; and the self-conscious, emotional, religious man only a handful of people ever met. Martin Blumenson deftly explores the life of this American hero, a paradoxical man who inspired others to greatness but who sometimes questioned the greatness within himself.

Patton: The Man Behind the Legend, 1885-1945 is a dramatic and memorable portrait of a complex American hero, a man called ''the greatest combat general of modern times.''

The Old Way: A Story of the First People [Audiobook]

The Old Way: A Story of the First People [Audiobook]

The Old Way: A Story of the First People [Audiobook] by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas
2006 | MP3@128 kbps | 11 hrs 25 mins | 627.12MB

One of our most influential anthropologists reevaluates her long and illustrious career by returning to her roots—and the roots of life as we know it.

When Elizabeth Marshall Thomas first arrived in Africa to live among the Kalahari San, or bushmen, it was 1950, she was nineteen years old, and these last surviving hunter-gatherers were living as humans had lived for 15,000 centuries. Thomas wound up writing about their world in a seminal work, The Harmless People (1959). It has never gone out of print.

Back then, this was uncharted territory and little was known about our human origins. Today, our beginnings are better understood. And after a lifetime of interest in the bushmen, Thomas has come to see that their lifestyle reveals great, hidden truths about human evolution.

As she displayed in her bestseller, The Hidden Life of Dogs, Thomas has a rare gift for giving voice to the voices we don't usually listen to, and helps us see the path that we have taken in our human journey. In The Old Way, she shows how the skills and customs of the hunter-gatherer share much in common with the survival tactics of our animal predecessors. And since it is "knowledge, not objects, that endure" over time, Thomas vividly brings us to see how linked we are to our origins in the animal kingdom.

The Old Way is a rare and remarkable achievement, sure to stir up controversy, and worthy of celebration.

Sex Cells: The Medical Market for Eggs and Sperm

Sex Cells: The Medical Market for Eggs and Sperm

Sex Cells: The Medical Market for Eggs and Sperm by Rene Almeling
2011 | EPUB | 1.37MB

Unimaginable until the twentieth century, the clinical practice of transferring eggs and sperm from body to body is now the basis of a bustling market.

In Sex Cells, Rene Almeling provides an inside look at how egg agencies and sperm banks do business. Although both men and women are usually drawn to donation for financial reasons, Almeling finds that clinics encourage sperm donors to think of the payments as remuneration for an easy "job." Women receive more money but are urged to regard egg donation in feminine terms, as the ultimate "gift" from one woman to another.

Sex Cells shows how the gendered framing of paid donation, as either a job or a gift, not only influences the structure of the market, but also profoundly affects the individuals whose genetic material is being purchased.

The Cyberiad: Fables for the Cybernetic Age [Audiobook]

The Cyberiad: Fables for the Cybernetic Age [Audiobook]

The Cyberiad: Fables for the Cybernetic Age [Audiobook] by Stanislaw Lem
2012 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 35 mins | 263.47MB

A brilliantly crafted collection of stories from celebrated science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem.

Trurl and Klaupacius are constructor robots who try to out-invent each other. Over the course of their adventures in The Cyberiad, they travel to the far corners of the cosmos to take on freelance problem-solving jobs, with dire consequences for their unsuspecting employers.

Playfully written, and ranging from the prophetic to the surreal, these stories demonstrate Stanislaw Lem's vast talent and remarkable ability to blend meaning and magic into a wholly entertaining and captivating work.

Anthology of Japanese Literature

Anthology of Japanese Literature

Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century edited by Donald Keene
1994 | EPUB | 1.83MB

The sweep of Japanese literature in all its great variety was made available to Western readers for the first time in this anthology.

Every genre and style, from the celebrated No plays to the poetry and novels of the seventeenth century, find a place in this book. An introduction by Donald Keene places the selections in their proper historical context, allowing the readers to enjoy the book both as literature and as a guide to the cultural history of Japan.

Selections include “Man’yoshu” or “Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves” from the ancient period; “Kokinshu” or “Collection of Ancient and Modern Poetry,” “The Tosa Diary” of Ki No Tsurayuki, “Yugao” from “Tales of Genji” of Murasaki Shikibu, and “The Pillow Book” of Sei Shonagon from the Heian Period; “The Tale of the Heike” from the Kamakura Period; Plan of the No Stage, “Birds of Sorrow” of Seami Motokiyo, and “Three Poets at Minase” from the Muromachi Period; and Sections from Basho, including “The Narrow Road of Oku,” “The Love Suicides at Sonezaki” by Chikamatsu Monzaemon, and Waka and haiku of the Tokugawa Period.

The Sound of Things Falling

The Sound of Things Falling

The Sound of Things Falling by Juan Gabriel Vásquez
2012 | EPUB | 431.82KB

Juan Gabriel Vásquez has been hailed not only as one of South America’s greatest literary stars, but also as one of the most acclaimed writers of his generation.

In this gorgeously wrought, award-winning novel, Vásquez confronts the history of his home country, Colombia. In the city of Bogotá, Antonio Yammara reads an article about a hippo that had escaped from a derelict zoo once owned by legendary Colombian drug kingpin Pablo Escobar. The article transports Antonio back to when the war between Escobar’s Medellín cartel and government forces played out violently in Colombia’s streets and in the skies above. Back then, Antonio witnessed a friend’s murder, an event that haunts him still. As he investigates, he discovers the many ways in which his own life and his friend’s family have been shaped by his country’s recent violent past. His journey leads him all the way back to the 1960s and a world on the brink of change: a time before narco-trafficking trapped a whole generation in a living nightmare.

Vásquez is “one of the most original new voices of Latin American literature,” according to Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa, and The Sound of Things Falling is his most personal, most contemporary novel to date, a masterpiece that takes his writing—and will take his literary star—even higher.

Tea Wisdom

Tea Wisdom

Tea Wisdom: Inspirational Quotes and Quips About the World's Most Celebrated Beverage by Aaron Fisher
2012 | EPUB | 7.02MB

Some of life's greatest pleasures can be found in the simple things, and there is nothing more basic, yet wonderful, than enjoying a steaming cup of tea on a damp, rainy day. Tea Wisdom is a wonderful collection of tea quotes, drawn from different centuries and parts of the world, celebrating the ability of tea to calm the nerves, enliven the mind and strengthen the spirit. Covering the full range of a tea lover's appreciation for this most celebrated of beverages, Tea Wisdom makes for a lovely treat.