The Swerve: How the World Became Modern [Audiobook]

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern [Audiobook]

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern [Audiobook] by Stephen Greenblatt
2011 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9 hrs 42 mins | 266.62MB

Renowned historian Stephen Greenblatt's works shoot to the top of the New York Times best-seller list. With The Swerve, Greenblatt transports listeners to the dawn of the Renaissance and chronicles the life of an intrepid book lover who rescued the Roman philosophical text On the Nature of Things from certain oblivion.

Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late 30s took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic by Lucretius-a beautiful poem containing the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles in eternal motion, colliding and swerving in new directions.

The copying and translation of this ancient book-the greatest discovery of the greatest book-hunter of his age-fueled the Renaissance, inspiring artists such as Botticelli and thinkers such as Giordano Bruno; shaped the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein; and had a revolutionary influence on writers such as Montaigne and Shakespeare, and even Thomas Jefferson.

Just My Type: A Book About Fonts [Audiobook]

Just My Type: A Book About Fonts [Audiobook]

Just My Type: A Book About Fonts [Audiobook] by Simon Garfield
2011 | MP3@64 kbps + PDF | 7 hrs 42 mins | 211.36MB

Simon Garfield’s Just My Type presents an entertaining history of fonts, from font "pirating" dating back nearly as far as Gutenberg to the creation of Comic Sans and Ikea’s font-change controversy. With a variety of recent, news-making examples and font samples throughout, Just My Type explains how and why certain fonts can elicit emotions or gut-instinct reactions. Garfield’s humor and historical anecdotes add to his deep understanding of how something as simple as font choice can speak volumes about our cultural climate--and why it’s so easy to agonize over what font to use on a party invitation. Whether you’re already a font aficionado or can’t tell the difference between Times New Roman and Arial, this entertaining history will give you a greater appreciation of the typefaces that surround you every day.

Start [Audiobook]

Start [Audiobook]

Start: Punch Fear in the Face, Escape Average and Do Work That Matters [Audiobook] by Jon Acuff
2013 | M4B + EPUB | 6 hrs 05 mins | 97.29MB

Wall Street Journal best-selling author Jon Acuff reveals the steps to getting unstuck and back onto the path of being awesome.

Over the last 100 years, the road to success for most everyone has been divided into predictable stages. But three things have changed the path to success:

  • Boomers are realizing that a lot of the things they were promised aren't going to materialize, and they have started second and third careers.
  • Technology has given access to an unprecedented number of people who are building online empires and changing their lives in ways that would have been impossible years ago.
  • The days of "success first, significance later" have ended.

While none of the stages can be skipped, they can be shortened and accelerated. There are only two paths in life: average and awesome. The average path is easy because all you have to do is nothing. The awesome path is more challenging, because things like fear only bother you when you do work that matters. The good news is Start gives listeners practical, actionable insights to be more awesome, more often.

Euclid's Window [Audiobook]

Euclid's Window [Audiobook]

Euclid's Window: The Story of Geometry from Parallel Lines to Hyperspace [Audiobook] by Leonard Mlodinow
2002 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 8 hrs 03 mins | 221.16MB

Through Euclid's Window Leonard Mlodinow brilliantly and delightfully leads us on a journey through five revolutions in geometry, from the Greek concept of parallel lines to the latest notions of hyperspace. Here is an altogether new, refreshing, alternative history of math revealing how simple questions anyone might ask about space -- in the living room or in some other galaxy -- have been the hidden engine of the highest achievements in science and technology.

Mlodinow reveals how geometry's first revolution began with a "little" scheme hatched by Pythagoras: the invention of a system of abstract rules that could model the universe. That modest idea was the basis of scientific civilization. But further advance was halted when the Western mind nodded off into the Dark Ages. Finally in the fourteenth century an obscure bishop in France invented the graph and heralded the next revolution: the marriage of geometry and number. Then, while intrepid mariners were sailing back and forth across the Atlantic to the New World, a fifteen-year-old genius realized that, like the earth's surface, space could be curved. Could parallel lines really meet? Could the angles of a triangle really add up to more -- or less -- than 180 degrees? The curved-space revolution reinvented both mathematics and physics; it also set the stage for a patent office clerk named Einstein to add time to the dimensions of space. His great geometric revolution ushered in the modern era of physics.

Today we are in the midst of a new revolution. At Caltech, Princeton, and universities around the world, scientists are recognizing that all the varied and wondrous forces of nature can be understood through geometry -- a weird new geometry. It is a thrilling math of extra, twisted dimensions, in which space and time, matter and energy, are all intertwined and revealed as consequences of a deep, underlying structure of the universe.

Based on Mlodinow's extensive historical research; his studies alongside colleagues such as Richard Feynman and Kip Thorne; and interviews with leading physicists and mathematicians such as Murray Gell-Mann, Edward Witten, and Brian Greene, Euclid's Window is an extraordinary blend of rigorous, authoritative investigation and accessible, good-humored storytelling that makes a stunningly original argument asserting the primacy of geometry. For those who have looked through Euclid's Window, no space, no thing, and no time will ever be quite the same.

The Essence of Success [Audiobook]

The Essence of Success [Audiobook]

The Essence of Success [Audiobook] by Earl Nightingale
1997 | MP3@128 kbps | 16 hrs 16 mins | 895.25MB

The program is divided into ten volumes that have myriad benefits such as: Volumes 1 through 6 will teach you how to develop an excellent attitude, enhance your self-esteem, foster your creative genius, set and achieve goals, harnessing your mind's power, and elements of personal growth. Volumes 7 and 8 deal with critical success factors such as writing skills, public speaking skills, being a better communicator, and fostering excellent relationships. Volumes 9 and 10 will teach you how to achieve success and happiness.

Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea [Audiobook]

Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea [Audiobook]

Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea [Audiobook] by Carl Zimmer
2001 | MP3@96 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 33 mins | 270.34MB

While its opponents may sneer that "it's just a theory," evolution has transcended that label to take its place as one of the most important ideas in human history. Science journalist Carl Zimmer explores its history and future in Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea, a companion piece to the epic PBS series of the same name. The book, lavishly illustrated with photos of our distant cousins, anatomical diagrams, and timelines, is as beautiful as it is enlightening. While those closely following the field will find little more here than a well-written summation of the state of the art in 2001, readers who have watched the evolutionary debates from a distance will quickly catch up with the details of the principal arguments.

Zimmer's text is fresh and expansive, explaining both the minutiae of comparative anatomy and the grand scale of geological time with verve and clarity. Following the trend of turn-of-the-century evolution writers, he treats the religious beliefs of creationists with respect, while firmly insisting that the scientific evidence against their position is too compelling to ignore. Touching on biology, philosophy, theology, politics, and nearly every other field of human thought, Evolution will inspire its readers with the elegance and importance of Darwin's simple theory.