The Book of Numbers

The Book of Numbers

The Book of Numbers: From Zero to Inifinity, an Entertaining List of Every Number that Counts by Tim Glynne-Jones
2009 | PDF | 5.38MB

From zero to infinity, The Book of Numbers opens up a new world of knowledge based on the magic of numbers. Within these pages, every number of significance is listed together with its special qualities and associations. Along the way, there are many detours and diversions as well as detailed box-outs which help throw further light on every number that counts. This book is a sequence of numbers, starting from zero and working forward, all presented in a fascinating and fun fashion.

Numbers have occupied human thoughts since man first realized he had not one opposable thumb but two. And from simple enumeration they have grown to be the most important and universal language there is. This book highlights the dominant role that numbers play in everyday life, as well as exploring how numbers and number systems evolved, and delving into the mysteries of mankind's most powerful numbers. From algebra to astrology, music to mythology, from religion to recreation and from science to superstition, The Book of Numbers embraces this infinitely broad subject and puts it all in order—beginning with 0.

Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity

Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity

Everything and More: A Compact History of Infinity by David Foster Wallace
2003 | PDF | 10.93MB

The best-selling author of Infinite Jest on the two-thousand-year-old quest to understand infinity.

One of the outstanding voices of his generation, David Foster Wallace has won a large and devoted following for the intellectual ambition and bravura style of his fiction and essays. Now he brings his considerable talents to the history of one of math's most enduring puzzles: the seemingly paradoxical nature of infinity.

Is infinity a valid mathematical property or a meaningless abstraction? The nineteenth-century mathematical genius Georg Cantor's answer to this question not only surprised him but also shook the very foundations upon which math had been built. Cantor's counterintuitive discovery of a progression of larger and larger infinities created controversy in his time and may have hastened his mental breakdown, but it also helped lead to the development of set theory, analytic philosophy, and even computer technology.

Smart, challenging, and thoroughly rewarding, Wallace's tour de force brings immediate and high-profile recognition to the bizarre and fascinating world of higher mathematics.

Time Reborn

Time Reborn

Time Reborn: From the Crisis in Physics to the Future of the Universe by Lee Smolin
2013 | EPUB | 1.43MB

From one of our foremost thinkers and public intellectuals, a radical new view of the nature of time and the cosmos.

What is time?

This deceptively simple question is the single most important problem facing science as we probe more deeply into the fundamentals of the universe. All of the mysteries physicists and cosmologists face—from the Big Bang to the future of the universe, from the puzzles of quantum physics to the unification of forces and particles—come down to the nature of time.

The fact that time is real may seem obvious. You experience it passing every day when you watch clocks tick, bread toast, and children grow. But most physicists, from Newton to Einstein to today’s quantum theorists, have seen things differently. The scientific case for time being an illusion is formidable. That is why the consequences of adopting the view that time is real are revolutionary.

Lee Smolin, author of the controversial bestseller The Trouble with Physics, argues that a limited notion of time is holding physics back. It’s time for a major revolution in scientific thought. The reality of time could be the key to the next big breakthrough in theoretical physics.

What if the laws of physics themselves were not timeless? What if they could evolve? Time Reborn offers a radical new approach to cosmology that embraces the reality of time and opens up a whole new universe of possibilities. There are few ideas that, like our notion of time, shape our thinking about literally everything, with huge implications for physics and beyond—from climate change to the economic crisis. Smolin explains in lively and lucid prose how the true nature of time impacts our world.

Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air

Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air

Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air by Richard Holmes
2013 | EPUB | 12.63MB

Falling Upwards tells the story of the enigmatic group of men and women who first risked their lives to take to the air, and so discovered a new dimension of human experience. Why they did it, what their contemporaries thought of them, and how their flights revealed the secrets of our planet in wholly unexpected ways is its subject.

Dramatic sequences move from the early Anglo-French balloon rivalries; the crazy firework flights of beautiful Sophie Blanchard; the revelatory ascents over the great Victorian cities and sprawling industrial towns of Northern Europe; the astonishing long-distance voyages of the American entrepreneur John Wise, and the French photographer Felix Nadar, to the terrifying high-altitude flights of James Glaisher FRS who rose above seven miles without oxygen, helping to establish the new science of meteorology as well as the environmental notion--so important to us today--of a "fragile" planet. Balloons were also used to observe the horrors of modern battle during the American Civil War (including a memorable flight by General Custer).

Readers will also discover the many writers and dreamers--from Mary Shelley to Edgar Allan Poe, from Charles Dickens to Jules Verne--who felt the imaginative impact of flight and allowed it to soar in their work. Most of all, through the strange allure of the great balloonists, Holmes offers another of his subtle portraits of human endeavor, recklessness, and vision.

The Age of Wonder

The Age of Wonder

The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science by Richard Holmes
2008 | EPUB | 8.7MB

A riveting history of the men and women whose discoveries and inventions at the end of the eighteenth century gave birth to the Romantic Age of Science.

When young Joseph Banks stepped onto a Tahitian beach in 1769, he hoped to discover Paradise. Inspired by the scientific ferment sweeping through Britain, the botanist had sailed with Captain Cook on his first "Endeavour "voyage in search of new worlds. Other voyages of discovery--astronomical, chemical, poetical, philosophical--swiftly follow in Richard Holmes's original evocation of what truly emerges as an Age of Wonder.

Brilliantly conceived as a relay of scientific stories, "The Age of Wonder" investigates the earliest ideas of deep time and space, and the explorers of "dynamic science," of an infinite, mysterious Nature waiting to be discovered. Three lives dominate the book: William Herschel and his sister Caroline, whose dedication to the study of the stars forever changed the public conception of the solar system, the Milky Way, and the meaning of the universe; and Humphry Davy, who, with only a grammar school education stunned the scientific community with his near-suicidal gas experiments that led to the invention of the miners' lamp and established British chemistry as the leading professional science in Europe. This age of exploration extended to great writers and poets as well as scientists, all creators relishing in moments of high exhilaration, boundary-pushing and discovery.

Holmes's extraordinary evocation of this age of wonder shows how great ideas and experiments--both successes and failures--were born of singular and often lonely dedication, and how religious faith and scientific truth collide. He has written a book breathtaking in its originality, its storytelling energy, and its intellectual significance.

397 Ways To Save Money

397 Ways To Save Money

397 Ways To Save Money by Kerry Taylor
2009 | EPUB | 1.94MB

Families are always looking for simple and effective ways to stretch their household budgets. In tight times, finding extra dollars in unexpected places is even more important. Packed with ideas, information, tips and tricks that range from longterm savings to instant cash in your pocket, 397 Ways to Save Money makes budgeted living easy -- and even fun.

Written by an average Canadian whose frugal ways have saved her thousands, this accessible guide offers saving savvy that you don’t need to be a financial planner to understand. By looking in every corner of every room in your house, from the kitchen to the closet, and by considering the needs of every member of your family, from your toddler to your dog, 397 Ways to Save Money will help you find thousands of dollars in savings.

3 Quick Ways to Save

  • Raise your homeowner insurance deductibles from $250 to $500 -- you’ll save up to 15 percent on your premiums immediately and more in the long run because making fewer small claims helps keep your premiums from increasing.
  • Brush your dog’s teeth -- it sounds like a silly task, but dental cleanings at the vet can cost between $200 and $500. Pick up a toothbrush and toothpaste at your pet store, and brush up those savings.
  • Watch those drinks! Eating out with the family is much cheaper if everyone orders water. Adding three or four chocolate milks or Cokes to the bill can easily boost the cost by $10. Forgo your beer or glass of wine and save even more.