European Dictatorships 1918-1945 [Third Edition]

European Dictatorships 1918-1945 [Third Edition]

European Dictatorships 1918-1945 [Third Edition] by Stephen J Lee
Routledge | 2008 | ISBN: 0415454840 | EPUB | 5.19MB


European Dictatorships 1918–1945 surveys the extraordinary circumstances leading to, and arising from, the transformation of over half of Europe’s states to dictatorships between the first and the second World Wars. It describes the course of dictatorship in Europe before and during the Second World War, and examines the phenomenon of dictatorship itself and the widely different forms it can take. From the notorious dictatorships of Mussolini, Hitler and Stalin to less well-known states and leaders, this book scrutinizes the experiences of Russia, Germany, Italy, Spain and Portugal, and Central and Eastern European states.


This third edition has been revised throughout to include recent historical research and contains a completely new chapter on the meaning of dictatorship. Including new tables, maps and diagrams, this is the perfect survey for all students of the period.


Bushido: The Soul of Japan

Bushido: The Soul of Japan

Bushido: The Soul of Japan by Inazo Nitobe
Duke Classics | 2012 | ISBN: 1620117142 | EPUB | 287.58KB


Bushido, often translated as Way of the Warrior, came from the Samurai way of life and moral code. It emphasized loyalty, skill, moderation and honor, and became a widespread influence throughout Japan. In Shogakukan Kokugo Daijiten, the Japanese dictionary, "Bushido is defined as a unique philosophy (ronri) that spread through the warrior class from the Muromachi (chusei) period."


Nitobe Inazo, in his book Bushido: The Soul of Japan, described it in this way. "...Bushido, then, is the code of moral principles which the samurai were required or instructed to observe... More frequently it is a code unuttered and unwritten... It was an organic growth of decades and centuries of military career."


The Drunken Botanist

The Drunken Botanist

The Drunken Botanist: The Plants that Create the World's Great Drinks by Amy Stewart
Algonquin Books | 2013 | ISBN: 1616201045 | EPUB | 9.83MB


Sake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley, tequila from agave, rum from sugarcane, bourbon from corn. Thirsty yet? In The Drunken Botanist, Amy Stewart explores the dizzying array of herbs, flowers, trees, fruits, and fungi that humans have, through ingenuity, inspiration, and sheer desperation, contrived to transform into alcohol over the centuries.


Of all the extraordinary and obscure plants that have been fermented and distilled, a few are dangerous, some are downright bizarre, and one is as ancient as dinosaurs—but each represents a unique cultural contribution to our global drinking traditions and our history. This fascinating concoction of biology, chemistry, history, etymology, and mixology—with more than fifty drink recipes and growing tips for gardeners—will make you the most popular guest at any cocktail party.


Owning Your Own Shadow

Owning Your Own Shadow

Owning Your Own Shadow: Understanding the Dark Side of the Psyche by Robert A Johnson
HarperCollins | 2013 | ISBN: 0061957682 | EPUB | 610.08KB


The shadow in Jungian psychology is the unconscious dumping ground for undesirable characteristics of personality. "Owning" the shadow--accepting it as part of one's self--is seen as the first step toward wholeness. Using examples from history, mythology, and religion, Johnson, author of Inner Work and Transformation, offers a tour of the shadow, showing its origin and features, and demonstrating how and why it bursts into consciousness when least expected. Returning to the subject of his earlier work We, the author reveals how experience of romantic love may lead to awareness of both positive and negative aspects of the shadow, and how integrating the shadow into one's personality can be a challenging religious experience.


Inner Work

Inner Work

Inner Work: Using Dreams and Active Imagination for Personal Growth by Robert A Johnson
Harper & Row | 1989 | ISBN: 0062504312 | MOBI | 465.55KB


In this book Johnson introduces a simple four-step method aimed at helping us explore the unconscious. He encourages us to pinpoint the symbols that appear in our dreams and active imaginings; to note our conscious associations to these symbols; meaningfully to personalize what we have accomplished in these first two steps; and finally through rituals to translate the insights gained into memorable conscious experiences. By providing clear instructions, with illustrations, he gives us a feeling for inner work, making it feasible without reliance on formal analysis. Johnson's well-written book should appeal both to general readers and to specialists in the field.


The Art of Living

The Art of Living

The Art of Living: The Classical Mannual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness by Epictetus
HarperCollins | 2013 | ISBN: 0062273760 | EPUB | 137.32KB


Epictetus was born into slavery about 55 ce in the eastern outreaches of the Roman Empire. Once freed, he established an influential school of Stoic philosophy, stressing that human beings cannot control life, only their responses to it. By putting into practice the ninety-three witty, wise, and razor-sharp instructions that make up The Art of Living, readers learn to meet the challenges of everyday life successfully and to face life's inevitable losses and disappointments with grace.


A New Interpretation by Sharon Lebell.


The Girls of Atomic City

The Girls of Atomic City

The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II by Denise Kiernan
Touchstone | 2013 | ISBN: 1451617526 | MOBI | 7.67MB


AT THE HEIGHT OF WORLD WAR II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was home to 75,000 residents, consuming more electricity than New York City. But to most of the world, the town did not exist. Thousands of civilians--many of them young women from small towns across the South--were recruited to this secret city, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work. Kept very much in the dark, few would ever guess the true nature of the tasks they performed each day in the hulking factories in the middle of the Appalachian Mountains. That is, until the end of the war--when Oak Ridge's secret was revealed.


Drawing on the voices of the women who lived it--women who are now in their eighties and nineties-- The Girls of Atomic City rescues a remarkable, forgotten chapter of American history from obscurity. Denise Kiernan captures the spirit of the times through these women: their pluck, their desire to contribute, and their enduring courage. Combining the grand-scale human drama of The Worst Hard Time with the intimate biography and often troubling science of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, The Girls of Atomic City is a lasting and important addition to our country's history.


The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
Crown | 2010 | ISBN: 0307589382 | EPUB | 5.02MB


Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells--taken without her knowledge--became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first "immortal" human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. If you could pile all HeLa cells ever grown onto a scale, they'd weigh more than 50 million metric tons--as much as a hundred Empire State Buildings. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb's effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions.


Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave.


Now Rebecca Skloot takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the "colored" ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s to stark white laboratories with freezers full of HeLa cells; from Henrietta's small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia--a land of wooden slave quarters, faith healings, and voodoo--to East Baltimore today, where her children and grandchildren live and struggle with the legacy of her cells.


Henrietta's family did not learn of her "immortality" until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists investigating HeLa began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. And though the cells had launched a multimillion-dollar industry that sells human biological materials, her family never saw any of the profits. As Rebecca Skloot so brilliantly shows, the story of the Lacks family--past and present--is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of.


Over the decade it took to uncover this story, Rebecca became enmeshed in the lives of the Lacks family--especially Henrietta's daughter Deborah, who was devastated to learn about her mother's cells. She was consumed with questions: Had scientists cloned her mother? Did it hurt her when researchers infected her cells with viruses and shot them into space? What happened to her sister, Elsie, who died in a mental institution at the age of fifteen? And if her mother was so important to medicine, why couldn't her children afford health insurance?


Intimate in feeling, astonishing in scope, and impossible to put down, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks captures the beauty and drama of scientific discovery, as well as its human consequences.


The Predator Culture

The Predator Culture

The Predator Culture: The Systemic Roots and Intent of Organised Violence by Fred Harrison
Shepheard Walwyn Publishing | 2012 | ISBN: 0856833266 | EPUB | 546.42KB


Fred Harrison draws on global-wide case studies to show how the violent birth of nation-states, whether the result of territorial conquests or colonialism, splits the population into two classes, victors and vanquished. This division is perpetuated and legitimated through the system of land tenure. The pathological consequences – as diverse as failed states, organised crime (mafia), religious fundamentalism and the re-emergence of piracy – are the result of the violent uprooting of the original inhabitants from their homelands.


Understanding the territorial basis of political power and wealth is the pre-requisite, Fred Harrison argues, for making sense of issues as diverse as genocide, narco-gangsterism, terrorism and fascism. The struggle over land and resources, he contends, is at the root of all of today's global crises. Some attempts are being made to restore land to those in need, ranging from the offer of land in Afghanistan to the Taliban as an inducement to set aside their violent strategies, to the sharing of the rents of oil in Nigeria to entice eco-warriors into mainstream politics. But these piecemeal tactics fail to synthesise the conditions for peace and prosperity.


The Predator Culture provides a framework for truth and reconciliation in what has become a violent world that is slipping dangerously out of control.


Simon: The Genius in My Basement

Simon: The Genius in My Basement

Simon: The Genius in My Basement by Alexander Masters
Delacorte Press | 2012 | ISBN: 034553221X | EPUB | 13.54MB


Alexander Masters tripped over his first book subject on a Cambridge sidewalk, and the result was the multi-award-winning bestseller Stuart: A Life Backwards. His second, he’s found under his floorboards.


One of the greatest mathematical prodigies of the twentieth century, Simon Norton stomps around Alexander’s basement in semidarkness, dodging between stalagmites of bus timetables and engorged plastic bags, eating tinned kippers stirred into packets of Bombay mix. Simon is exploring a theoretical puzzle so complex and critical to our understanding of the universe that it is known as the Monster. It looks like a sudoku table—except a sudoku table has nine columns of numbers.


The Monster has 808017424794512875886459904961710757005754368000000000 columns.


But that’s not the whole story. What’s inside the decaying sports bag he never lets out of his clutches? Why does he hurtle out of the house in the middle of the night? And—good God!—what is that noxious smell that creeps up the stairwell?


Grumpy, poignant, comical—more intimate than either the author or his quarry intended—Simon: The Genius in My Basement is the story of a friendship and a pursuit. Part biography, part memoir, and part popular science, it is a study of the frailty of brilliance, the measures of happiness, and Britain’s most uncooperative egghead eccentric.


Trigger Point Therapy for Foot, Ankle, Knee, and Leg Pain

Trigger Point Therapy for Foot, Ankle, Knee, and Leg Pain

Trigger Point Therapy for Foot, Ankle, Knee, and Leg Pain by Valerie DeLaune
New Harbinger Publications | 2012 | ISBN: 1608822400 | EPUB | 4.09MB


Licensed acupuncturist, certified massage therapist, and trigger point specialist Valerie DeLaune presents Trigger Point Therapy for Foot, Ankle, Knee, and Leg Pain, the first book to offer trigger point therapy techniques specifically for these types of pain. This book features step-by-step home treatment plans for an array of musculoskeletal conditions, including bunions, hammertoes, ankle pain, Achilles tendonitis, restless leg syndrome, and more.


Striking Back: The 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre

Striking Back: The 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre

Striking Back: The 1972 Munich Olympics Massacre and Israel's Deadly Response by Aaron J Klein
Random House | 2007 | ISBN: 1588365867 | EPUB | 1.45MB


Award-winning journalist Aaron J. Klein tells, for the first time, the complete story of the 1972 Munich Olympics massacre and the Israeli counterterrorism operation it spawned. With unprecedented access to Mossad agents and an unparalleled knowledge of Israeli intelligence, Klein peels back the layers of myth and misinformation that have permeated previous books, films, and magazine articles about the “shadow war” against Black September and other related terrorist groups.


In this riveting account, long-held secrets are finally revealed, including who was killed and who was not, how it was done, which targets were hit and which were missed. In the end, Klein shows that the Israeli response to Munich was not simply about revenge, as is popularly believed. By illuminating the tactical and strategic purposes of the Israeli operation, Striking Back allows us to draw profoundly relevant lessons from one of the most important counterterrorism campaigns in history.




AUDIOBOOK

Chatham Dockyard

Chatham Dockyard

Chatham Dockyard: The Rise and Fall of a Military Industrial Complex by Philip MacDougall
The History Press | 2012 | ISBN: 0752462121 | EPUB | 3.43MB


Founded in 1570, Chatham Dockyard quickly became one of the most important naval yards for the repair and building of warships, maintaining a pre-eminent position for the next 400 years. Located on the River Medway, the yard was responsible for the construction of over 500 warships in all, these ranging from simple naval pinnaces to first-rates that fought at Trafalgar, and concluding with the hunter-killer submarines of the nuclear age.


In this detailed new history of the yard from experienced local and maritime author Philip MacDougall, particular attention is given to the final 200 years of the yard’s history, the artisans and labourers who worked ther,e and the changing methods used in the construction of some of the finest warships to enter naval service. Coinciding with the dockyard’s seeking status as a World Heritage site, this fascinating history places Chatham firmly in its overall historical context.


Neil Webster's Cribs for Victory

Neil Webster's Cribs for Victory

Neil Webster's Cribs for Victory: The Untold Story of Bletchley Park's Secret Room by Joss Pearson
Polperro Heritage | 2011 | ISBN: 0955954185 | EPUB | 1.63MB


Cribs For Victory is a posthumous account of the secret code-breaking process in Bletchley Park's Fusion Room during World War II by Major Neil Webster, one of the key members of the team involved. The Fusion Room was the central unit where decrypted German messages obtained from Hut 6 were compared with the corresponding data extracted by the log readers from the daily radio traffic between enemy stations, thus enabling a complete wartime picture of the enemy order of battle to be constructed.


Neil Webster's liaison role between traffic analysis and cryptography meant he was centrally involved in the search for 'cribs' - short pieces of enciphered text where the meaning is either known or can be guessed, allowing the whole cipher to be broken. His book describes this intensive search in detail, the intellectual and technical challenge, the personal stories, the setbacks and the triumphs.


Security clearance for publication of his first-hand account was only granted in 2010, more than 20 years after his death. Was it too close to the real truth about how Enigma was broken and the inner workings of British intelligence? Webster's daughter, Joss Pearson, believes her father's book was just too clear, both about the relationship between signals intelligence and cryptography, and about the habits of the German military mind that opened the door to understanding Enigma.


What Hath God Wrought [Audiobook]

What Hath God Wrought [Audiobook]

What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815 - 1848 [Audiobook] by Daniel Walker Howe
Blackstone Audio | 2009 | ASIN: B001PI828I | MP3@64 kbps | 32 hrs 53 mins | 906.38MB


In this addition to the esteemed Oxford History of the United States series, historian Daniel Walker Howe illuminates the period from the Battle of New Orleans to the end of the Mexican-American War, an era of revolutionary improvements in transportation and communications that accelerated America's expansion and prompted the rise of mass political parties.


He examines the rise of Andrew Jackson and his Democratic party but contends that John Quincy Adams and other advocates of public education, economic integration, and the rights of blacks, women, and Indians were the true prophets of America's future.


Howe's panoramic narrative - weaving together social, economic, and cultural history with political and military events - culminates in the controversial but brilliantly executed war against Mexico that gained California and Texas for America.


Please note: The individual volumes of the series have not been published in historical order. What Hath God Wrought is number V in The Oxford History of the United States.


The Economist Audio Edition [March 30, 2013]

The Economist Audio Edition [March 30, 2013]

The Economist Audio Edition [March 30, 2013]
English | MP3@48 kbps | 7 hrs 23 min | 154.17MB


The audio edition contains word-for-word recordings of all articles published in The Economist, read by professional broadcasters and actors. It is ideal for anyone who wants to listen to articles while travelling, exercising or just relaxing.


The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by "The Economist Newspaper Ltd" and edited in London. It has been in continuous publication since James Wilson established it in September 1843. As of summer 2007, its average circulation topped 1.2 million copies a week, about half of which are sold in North America. Consequently it is often seen as a transatlantic (as opposed to solely British) news source.


The aim of The Economist is "to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress."Subjects covered include international news, economics, politics, business, finance, science, technology, and the arts. The publication is targeted at the high-end "prestige" segment of the market and counts among its audience influential business and government decision-makers.