Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi

Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi

Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi
Metropolitan Museum of Art | 2001 | ISBN: 0300090773 | 480 pages | PDF | 87.97MB


Father and daughter Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi were unusual and gifted artists. Orazio Gentileschi (1563-1639) was the most talented follower of Caravaggio and a figure of international renown, active at the courts of Marie de' Medici in France, Charles 1 in England, and in Rome, Genoa, and Turin. Artemisia (1593-1652/3) was the first Italian woman artist who was not only praised for her art by her contemporaries but whose paintings influenced the work of later generations. She is today a key figure in gender studies. Essays by an international group of art historians not only explore the development of each of these two painters individually but also compare their work, showing how both were influenced by their times and milieus. The book also includes new transcriptions of key parts of the notorious rape trial of Artemisia. This beautiful book is the catalogue for the first full-scale exhibition of the works of Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi, held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from 14th February to 12th May 2002, travelling thereafter to the St Louis Art Museum and to Rome.


This beautifully produced volume brings together for the first time works by two remarkable painters of seventeenth-century Italy who happen also to have been father and daughter: Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi. Famous in their own day, these two artists have enjoyed renewed fame in the twentieth century: Orazio as one of the first and certainly the most individual of Caravaggio's followers; Artemisia as the outstanding female painter prior to the twentieth century. The tumultuous lives of these two artists moved along parallel trajectories and take the reader from the popular quarters of papal Rome and the rough-and-tumble world of Naples to the courts of the grand duke of Tuscany, Marie de' Medici in Paris, and Charles I in London. These changing circumstances nourished two different aesthetic visions, both of which were deeply rooted in the Caravaggesque practice of painting directly from the posed model. While Orazio's art became every more refined and elegant, Artemisia espoused a rhetorical form of dramatic presentation that is the basis of Baroque painting.


Written to accompany the landmark exhibition held in Rome, New York, and Saint Louis, the book includes essays that describe the art and people the two painters encountered in the course of their peripatetic careers and address such issues as feminism ad the critical interpretation of Artemisia's work. The essays, arranged chronologically to follow the artists as they moved from city to city, not only provide critical commentary but illuminate the historical context in which they worked.


The appendices include previously unpublished documents relating to the trial of Orazio's colleague Agostino Tassi for his rape of Artemisia, which shed new light on her father's workshop practice, and a recently discovered inventory of Artemisia's household goods drawn up on the eve of her departure from Florence to Rome. The book is the work of Keith Christiansen and Judith W. Mann, with contributions by a team of outstanding scholars.


Byzantium: Faith and Power (1261-1557)

Byzantium: Faith and Power (1261-1557)

Byzantium: Faith and Power (1261-1557) by Helen C Evans
Metropolitan Museum of Art | 2004 | ISBN: 030010278X | 680 pages | PDF | 98.32MB


A sequel to the landmark catalogue The Glory of Byzantium, this magnificent book features work from the last golden age of the Byzantine empire. During the last centuries of the "Empire of the Romans", Byzantine artists created exceptional secular and religious works that had an enduring influence on art and culture. In later years, Eastern Christian centres of power emulated and transformed Byzantine artistic styles, the Islamic world adapted motifs drawn from Byzantium's imperial past, and the development of the Renaissance from Italy to the Lowlands was deeply affected by Byzantine artistic and intellectual practices. This spectacular book presents hundreds of objects in all media from the late thirteenth through mid-sixteenth centuries. Featured in full-colour reproductions are sacred icons, luxuriously embroidered silk textiles, richly gilded metalwork, miniature icons of glass, precious metals and gemstone, and elaborately decorated manuscripts. In the accompanying text, renowned scholars discuss the art and investigate the cultural and historical interaction between these major cultures: the Christian and Islamic East and the Latin West. Continuing the story of the critically acclaimed Glory of Byzantium: Art and Culture of the Middle Byzantine Era, A.D. 843-1261, this book, the first to focus exclusively on the last centuries of the Byzantine era, is a highly anticipated publication that will not be superceded for generations.


The Glory of Byzantium

The Glory of Byzantium

The Glory of Byzantium: Art and Culture of the Middle Byzantine Era, AD 843-1261 by Helen C Evans, William D Wixom
Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1997 | ISBN: 0870997777 | 574 pages | PDF | 85.71MB


In A.D. 843, following the resolution of the Iconoclastic controversy, which had raged throughout the Byzantine Empire for more than a century, the use of icons—images—was triumphantly reinstated in the Orthodox Church. This momentous event inspired much of the art of the following four centuries, which comprises the second great era of Byzantine culture and provides the starting point of this volume. The Glory of Byzantium, and the exhibition that it accompanies, concludes with the demise of the empire's role as a world power, evidenced by the Latin occupation of Constantinople from 1204 to 1261.


Conceived as the sequel to the landmark exhibition "Age of Spirituality," which was held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1976 and focused on the first centuries of Byzantium, "The Glory of Byzantium" explores four interrelated themes: the religious and secular culture of the Second Golden Age of the Byzantine Empire; the empire's interaction with its Christian neighbors and rivals; its relations with the Islamic East; and its contact with the Latin West. Bringing together the contributions of fifty-nine scholars and art historians, most of them working in the United States, the text explores the complex currents of Byzantine civilization in its myriad facets. More than 350 works of art assembled for the exhibition from 119 institutions in 24 countries are discussed and illustrated in the catalogue. Together they present a significant selection of the most beautiful and meaningful works that survive from the empire's Second Golden Age and from the countries that constituted its extended sphere of influence. Liturgical objects—including icons, mosaics, chalices, patens, and reliquaries—and secular objects—silks, ivories, ceramics, jewelry, and manuscripts—reflect the dynamic nature of the art of this era both within and outside the empire.


The first half of the volume treats the historical context, the religious sphere, and the secular courtly realm of the empire; the second half focuses on the interactions between Byzantium and other medieval cultures, including Islam and the Latin West. The 17 essays are accompanied by detailed discussions of the works of art and by full-color photographs, as well as by views of architectural sites and comparative illustrations. Many of these illustrations were made specifically for this volume by Bruce White, photographer, on site in Greece, Turkey, Egypt, Italy, Bulgaria, Hungary, Georgia, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation.


From Filippo Lippi to Piero della Francesca

From Filippo Lippi to Piero della Francesca

From Filippo Lippi to Piero della Francesca: Fra Carnevale and the Making of a Renaissance Master
Metropolitan Museum of Art | 2005 | ISBN: 0300107161 | 384 pages | PDF | 71.63MB


In this fascinating book, Fra Carnevale heretofore a mysterious, quasi-legendary figure emerges as a well-defined and pivotal artist in Renaissance Florence. In presenting their case, the authors take the reader from the workshop of Filippo Lippi in Florence to Urbino, capital of Federico da Montefeltro’s duchy in the region of the Marches. It was a road most memorably traveled by Piero della Francesca, who worked in Florence in 1439 and became Federico’s favorite artist. This book shows that other lesser known artists like Fra Carnevale also took the same path.


Among the many other artists painters and sculptors crucial to Fra Carnevale’s formation and discussed in this volume are Domenico Veneziano, Luca della Robbia, Pesellino, and Agostino di Duccio. Essays by Keith Christiansen, Andrea De Marchi, and Matteo Ceriana and a documentary appendix by Andrea Di Lorenzo and Matteo Mazzalupi transform our knowledge of this exciting moment in the history of Renaissance art.


In 1934 the Italian government lifted restrictions governing the gabled Barberini Collection in Rome, making it possible for two intriguing fifteenth-century paintings to be put on the international art market. Within just two years both had been sold—one to The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the other to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Neither their authorship nor their subjects were certain, but their ambitious depiction of architecture no less than their discursive, anecdotal approach to narration made them unique among Early Renaissance paintings. Who was their author? What was their function? How to explain their mastery of perspective and their sophisticated architectural settings? Building on over a century of scholarship as well as completely new archival information, this catalogue proposes answers to all three questions. In doing so, it examines the art of Florence in the 1440s and the work of, among others, Fra Filippo Lippi, Domenico Veneziano, Luca della Robbia, and Michelozzo. It then turns to the introduction of Renaissance style north of the Appenines, in the region of the Marches, and to the culture of the court at Urbino in the third quarter of the fifteenth century, dominated by its ruler, Federico da Montefeltro, the humanist-architect Leon Battista Alberti, and the sublime painter Piero della Francesca.


Egyptian Art in the Age of the Pyramids

Egyptian Art in the Age of the Pyramids

Egyptian Art in the Age of the Pyramids
Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1999 | ISBN: 0870999060 | 536 pages | PDF | 99.21MB


The Old Kingdom (about 2650-2150 B.C.E.) was the first golden age of Egyptian culture, a period that determined the form and character of Egyptian art for centuries to come. From the Third through the Sixth Dynasty, not only were the pyramids built in vast construction efforts, but artists working in an array of mediums and techniques-- stone, wood, precious metals, monumental statuary, reliefs, and wall paintings-- created masterpieces that still have the power to move us more than four millennia later.


This splendid volume, published to accompany a landmark exhibition organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Réunion des Musées Nationaux in Paris, and the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, brings together 115 Old Kingdom masterworks from museum collections throughout the world. Included are sculptures executed with such an acute observation of musculature and body movement that they brought an unprecedented realism to the rendering of men, women, children, and animals. Several depictions of family groups in particular show the sensitivity with which Old Kingdom artists illuminated human relationships. Individual masterpieces include the monumental statue of Hemiunu, thought to be responsible for the construction of the Great Pyramid at Giza; groups representing the Fourth Dynasty king Menkaure with a queen and various deities; and a unique alabaster statuette showing the Sixth Dynasty queen Ankh-nes-meryre II holding her son, the child king Pepi II, in her lap. In addition, there are delicate relief carvings that provide some of the earliest, most joyful artistic representations of daily life, stunning decorative-art pieces (jars, vases, jewelry, even a musical instrument), and a number of rare Old Kingdom wall paintings. The lively text by Dorothea Arnold offers an overview of the history, society, and art of the Old Kingdom and an informative discussion of each of the illustrated works. All of the pieces were newly photographed for the book by Bruce White.


Before Cortés: Sculpture of Middle America

Before Cortés: Sculpture of Middle America

Before Cortés: Sculpture of Middle America by Elizabeth Kennedy, John F Easby Scott
Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1970 | ISBN: 0870990179 | 322 pages | PDF | 75.46MB


The course of pre-Hispanic or, as it is frequently called, pre-Columbian art, has come full circle in our own twentieth century. It amazed the Spanish conquistadors four hundred fifty years ago, and, when first seen by European audiences, it evoked the spontaneous admiration and extravagant praise of such Renaissance figures as Dürer, Cellini, and Peter Martyr, an Italian cleric who wrote the first history of the New World. But all too soon it lapsed as art in Europe, to continue there merely as exotica in some princeling's Wunderkammer and still later in museums narrowly confined to ethnology and anthropology.


It is only in the United States that this art has been included in the collections of the most significant fine-arts museums and begun to be recognized by a few graduate schools of art and art history in our universities—a twentieth-century development of fairly limited acceptance. We at the Metropolitan are now proud to present it with other great art of the world.


Like the men of the Renaissance, the founding fathers of this Museum paid high tribute to the ancient art of the New World, which they felt was neither "savage" nor "barbarian," but showed "a cultivation of the love of beauty, measured by an independent standard which, however distinct from ours, nevertheless proves the presence of intellectual and art loving races of men." Some fine works were acquired and exhibited briefly, but the profound wisdom and farsightedness of the founding fathers were soon forgotten when most of these treasures were lent elsewhere (as anthropological or ethnographic material), and acquisition stopped. However, in the past two decades the pendulum has swung back, with international loan exhibitions from Colombia and Guatemala and the reciprocal loan agreement with Mexico, the great exhibition of masterpieces from The Museum of Primitive Art last year, the recent enrichment of our collections by important gifts from Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Cummings, Mrs. Harold L. Bache, and Mrs. Jacob Kaplan, and, of course, the truly notable agreement with the Honorable Nelson A. Rockefeller and The Museum of Primitive Art under which the superb collection of that museum will come to the Metropolitan in its entirety upon completion of the new wing to house it.


With the creation of a new Department of Primitive Art and the present exhibition we have not only come full circle but more than redeemed a pledge made in our Annual Report for 1883, wherein the President, John Taylor Johnston, stated: "The antiquities of our own continent should form a prominent feature in an American Museum, and we are charged with a special duty to make here a Museum of old American art for the study of American scholars as well as scholars from abroad."


Dosso Dossi: Court Painter in Renaissance Ferrara

Dosso Dossi: Court Painter in Renaissance Ferrara

Dosso Dossi: Court Painter in Renaissance Ferrara by Peter Humfrey
Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1999 | ISBN: 0810965305 | 328 pages | PDF | 54.82MB


The court of Ferrara was a leading centre of Renaissance art in the 16th century, and Dosso Dossi was its greatest and most idiosyncratic painter. Published to accompany a 1999 US exhibition of Dosso's work, this book examines nearly all his surviving paintings - mythological, literary and religious. While Dosso learned much from his contemporaries Titian, Raphael and Michelangelo, he developed a unique style marked by imagination, sensual delight and sharp wit. Each painting is reproduced and discussed in detail, and essays probe the artist's career and the visual poetry of his works, and present documentary information as well as technical analyses of his innovative working methods.


Imagination, sensual delight, a sharp wit—these qualities were enormously prized in sixteenth-century Ferrara, where one of the most cultured and powerful courts of the High Renaissance held sway. Dosso Dossi was the idiosyncratic, brilliant painter most responsible for turning those values into a glorious artistic reality. Dosso's rich color schemes are akin to those of his fellow North Italian Titian; he learned something about innovative composition from Raphael and about the force of the body from Michelangelo. But his paintings have a very individual appeal. In leafy natural surroundings containing an array of animals and heavenly bodies, events unfold that are often enigmatic, enacted by characters whose interrelationships elude definition. Dosso's painted world shares the spirit of contemporaneous epic poetry—such as Ariosto's Orlando Furioso—imbued as it is with mystery and transformation, energy and invention.


Along with his predecessor Giorgione, Dosso was one of the first painters to improvise on the canvas. Rather than following careful preparatory drawings, he composed and recomposed as he painted—a remarkably free process that is clearly revealed in new x-ray and infrared photographs. Dosso's virtuosic painting performance was thus itself a kind of magical invention. The play of his imagination is evident not only in the many pictures representing mythological or literary subjects but also in his religious paintings, which are lyrical and original, filled with spectacular visual effects and touches of humor.


When Ferrara's fortunes changed, at the end of the sixteenth century, most of Dosso's paintings were taken to Rome and ultimately dispersed. For this exhibition, almost all the surviving paintings have been brought together; in the catalogue entries each one receives a fresh and comprehensive scholarly discussion. The catalogue also contains essays that describe Dosso's artistic career and the highly charged world of the court at Ferrara and that probe the visual poetry and subtle wit of his work. The illuminating results of an extensive campaign of technical examination, undertaken in connection with the exhibition, are discussed and illustrated in additional essays and in observations that accompany the catalogue entries throughout. The book includes a full review of the scholarly literature, color reproductions of the paintings, many comparative illustrations, a chronology, and a complete bibliography.


Umberto Boccioni

Umberto Boccioni

Umberto Boccioni by Ester Coen Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1988 | ISBN: 0810907216 | 320 pages | PDF | 55.83MB


Umberto Boccioni (1882–1916) is a model of the spirit and flavor of Futurism—militant, exuberant, actively taking part in the social and political events of the turbulent times in which he lived. His manifestos and his powerfully sensuous visualizations exemplify the nature and the pertinence of the Futurist contribution to modern art. Along with F. T. Marinetti, Giacomo Balla, Carlo Carra, Luigi Russolo, and Gino Severini, Boccioni played a leading role in the development and practice of Futurist ideas and art. During his brief life he made seminal contributions through his writings, paintings, sculptures, drawings, and engravings.


Futurism burst forth with impassioned energy in Italy during the years immediately preceding World War I. Rejecting past idealism and scorning contemporary culture and society, the proponents of this major art movement shaped a forceful and revolutionary rhetoric that became the basis for their dynamic art, which conveys the frenetic and colorful motions of urban life. Throughout the course of the twentieth century, Futurism has been largely dismissed in favor of the Cubism concurrently developed in Paris. Yet the Futurist concepts set forth as early as 1910 have been of consequence in many areas of subsequent avant-garde art, both for their championing of the anti-past, pro-technological present and for the resulting art that injects Cubist formal elements with a lively, worldly, urban content.


This publication presents an overview of Boccioni's unique accomplishments; it includes both a comprehensive survey of his art and of his writings, a number of which appear here for the first time in English. It documents the first retrospective exhibition of Boccioni's art in the United States. The American audience at last has the opportunity to assess Boccioni's place in the history of twentieth-century art. His fields of whirling action demonstrate that the period standardly termed the Cubist epoch could, with equal justice, be termed the Futurist era, in acknowledgment of the vanguard movement in Italy.


Hudson River School Visions

Hudson River School Visions

Hudson River School Visions: The Landscapes of Sanford R Gifford by Kevin J Avery, Eleanor Jones Harvey, Franklin Kelly, Heidi Applegate Metropolitan Museum of Art | 2003 | ISBN: 0300101848 | 288 pages | PDF | 46.86MB


Sanford Robinson Gifford was a leading Hudson River School artist. His love of nature first surfaced as a youth growing up in Hudson, New York, and, together with his admiration for the works of Thomas Cole, inspired him to become a landscape painter. Influenced as well by J.M.W. Turner and by trips to Europe in the 1850s, Gifford's art was termed "air painting", for he made the ambient light of each scene - colour-saturated and atmospherically enriched - the key to its expression. Gifford was a founder of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. At the time of his death, he was so esteemed by the New York art world that the Museum mounted an exhibition of his work - its first accorded an American artist - and published a Memorial Catalogue that for nearly a century remained the principal source on the artist. This volume features essays examining Gifford's position in the Hudson River School, his Catskill and Adirondack subjects, his patrons, and his adventures as a traveller both at home and abroad. More than 70 of the artist's best-known sketches and paintings are discussed and reproduced in colour.