Age of Spirituality: A Symposium

Age of Spirituality: A Symposium

Age of Spirituality: A Symposium by Kurt Weitzmann

Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1980 | ISBN: 0691039569 | 180 pages | PDF | 23.66MB


In 1977 The Metropolitan Museum of Art presented Age of Spirituality: Late Antique and Early Christian Art, Third to Seventh Century, the largest exhibition ever to focus on the period that spans the transition between the classical and medieval ages. In keeping with the didactic spirit of the exhibition, the Museum held a symposium in November 1977 to provide the public with a broad background for appreciation of this little-known field and to offer art historians the provocative speculations and conclusions of their colleagues. In addition to art history, the distinguished scholars who participated in the symposium discussed the theology, literature, politics, economics, and architecture of the first centuries of the Christian Era. With its treatment of this complex period in scope and depth, Age of Spirituality: A Symposium is an ideal companion volume to the comprehensive exhibition catalogue, published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in association with Princeton University Press.


Appearing in this book are the nine papers delivered by the guest lecturers, as well as an introduction by the editor, Kurt Weitzmann, Professor Emeritus at Princeton University and, as Consultative Curator at the Metropolitan Museum, principal organizer of the exhibition.


American Impressionism and Realism

American Impressionism and Realism

American Impressionism and Realism: The Painting of Modern Life, 1885-1915 by H Barbara; Doreen Bolger; David Park Curry; N Mishoe Brennecke Weinberg

Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1994 | ISBN: 0870997017 | 384 pages | PDF | 77.1MB


An examination of the continuities and differences between American Impressionism and Realism. This volume was published in conjunction with a travelling exhibition installed at the MetMuseum of Art/NYC (1994). 340 illustrations, 140 in full color.


These painting styles have received oodles of attention from art historians of late, and one might wonder what more there is to be said on the subject. Happily, this volume offers novel approaches and outstandingly handsome illustrations, nearly half in color. Insightful commentary is arranged thematically and begins with the American twist given to Impressionism, a style essentially born and developed in France. Through essays on country, city, and home, the authors examine how the subject matter reflected the nature of American life and culture during that era. The catalog is to accompany a nationwide traveling exhibition. Appendixes include lists of works contained in and lenders to the exhibition, as well as biographies of the painters. Highly recommended for general as well as scholarly readers. - Kathleen Eagen Johnson, Historic Hudson Valley, Tarrytown, N.Y. Copyright 1994 Cahners Business Information.


Church's Great Picture the Heart of the Andes

Church's Great Picture the Heart of the Andes

Church's Great Picture the Heart of the Andes by Kevin J Avery

Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1993 | ISBN: 9994925199 | 64 pages | PDF | 7.75MB


Firederic Church, for the period of some twenty-five years encompassing the Civil War, occupied a preeminent position in the realm of American culture. During those years of remarkable growth in the intellectual life of the United States, from approximately 1855 to 1875, Church was his nation’s most famous painter and a pivotal figure in the world of art and society that centered on New York City. The exhibition of his pictures that were deliberately produced as individual showpieces became public events surrounded by a hubbub of advertising, hucksterism, and critical acclaim. Although Church was applauded as a leading painter of landscapes as early as the late 1840s, it was with the display of his Niagara in New Y ork in 185 7, and its rapturous reception by critics and the public there and later in London, that he became a figure of renown at the age of thirty-one.


Impressionism;: A Centenary Exhibition

Impressionism;: A Centenary Exhibition

Impressionism;: A Centenary Exhibition by Anne Distel

Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1974 | ISBN: 0870990977 | 219 pages | PDF | 26.44MB


As soon as the Musees Nationaux de France began to organize this exhibition, it became evident that it would be difficult to carry through such an enterprise satisfactorily without the help of an associate in the United States, where so many masterpieces of the Impressionist school are to be found. The choice of the Metropolitan Museum of Art was the result not only of the size and quality of its collection of Impressionist works but also — and perhaps more importantly — of the close and friendly relations that have long existed between the Metropolitan and the Reunion des Musees Nationaux de France, especially the Louvre.


Accordingly, an agreement was worked out for a joint effort to avoid competition for loans, combine the institutions' powers of persuasion, and possibly facilitate matters of transportation and insurance.


We feel that these first steps in international cooperation open the way to arresting or at least attenuating the competitive struggle that exists between the great museums of the world, a struggle financially burdensome and unacceptable when practiced by institutions that ultimately perform the same cultural task.


Liechtenstein: The Princely Collections

Liechtenstein: The Princely Collections

Liechtenstein: The Princely Collections by Reinhold Baumstark

Harry N Abrams | 1986 | ISBN: 0810912929 | 400 pages | PDF | 75.61MB


For successive generations the Princes of Liechtenstein have been devoted collectors of art. The result of this tradition is a collection of masterpieces that in its depth and breadth mirrors more than four hundred years of European history and ranks among the world's greatest private collections. The paintings, sculpture, firearms, porcelain, and other works of art exhibited at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and richly illustrated and discussed in this book were acquired or commissioned by the Princes of the House of Liechtenstein to decorate their magnificent palaces, to display their status and wealth, to make know their distinction as great collectors, and to satisfy their princely sense of noblesse oblige.


Of the many memorable masterpieces that make up the Princely Collections perhaps the most notable is the great cycle of eight canvases by Peter Paul Rubens—the history of Decius Mus, the Roman consul—the only complete ensemble of this type now in private hands. Other works by Rubens in the collection include the beguiling portrait of the artist's daughter Clara Serena and the Assumption of the Virgin, a monumental work of Rubens's maturity.


The catalogue conveys the continuum of the Princes' collecting by means of a series of high points revolving around specific moments in the history of the House of Liechtenstein. The paintings by Marcantonio Franceschini that once decorated the Liechtenstein Garden Palace in Vienna, for example, evoke the splendor of the Princes' numerous residences throughout Austria, Moravia, Bohemia, and Silesia; the magnificent pietre dure tables call to mind the close ties that the Princes of Liechtenstein had with the court of Emperor Rudolf II in Prague; and a wealth of elaborately decorated firearms dating from the late sixteenth through the eighteenth century recalls the role of the Princes not only as aristocratic huntsmen but also as great military leaders in the service of the Holy Roman Empire. The Liechtensteins' unflagging sense of service to the Emperors and their courtly taste are well symbolized by the spectacular Golden Carriage, a Rococo masterpiece of French carriage building that served Prince Joseph Wenzel von Liechtenstein in his ceremonial entry into Paris as imperial ambassador in 1738.


The superb and diverse panoply of works amassed by the Princes of the House of Liechtenstein not only represents the paradigm of a great European princely collection but also bears the distinction of being the private collection of the only surviving monarchy of the Holy Roman Empire, a princely house that traces its distinguished lineage back to the twelfth century. The exhibition of these esteemed works at The Metropolitan Museum of Art marks two modern highlights in the history of the Princely Collections, for never before have these works been on view in the New World, nor have the full depth and range of the Princely Collections been shown publicly to such advantage anywhere in the world for over thirty years.


Toulouse-Lautrec in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Toulouse-Lautrec in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Toulouse-Lautrec in the Metropolitan Museum of Art by Colta Feller Ives, Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec

Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1996 | ISBN: 0870998048 | 72 pages | PDF | 13.44MB


The Metropolitan Museum has in its collection an exceptional body of art in a range of media by the late-nineteenth-century French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. In exhibiting a large portion of these works, the Metropolitan once again invites the visitor—and the reader of this accompanying catalogue—to examine the product of a single fertile, inventive, and tireless mind through the rich veins of material housed at the Museum. The exhibition also gives us the chance to reassess the body of work in terms of recent scholarship. Additionally, since much of Toulouse-Lautrec's work is on paper and can be exhibited for only intermittent and limited periods of time, this show has given us an opportunity to examine these works from the point of view of conservation. Indeed, as it turned out, a number of the works on paper underwent extensive treatment before going on view.


The Museum's collection of art by Toulouse-Lautrec, the result largely of generous donations from private collectors, includes paintings, drawings, and examples of his finest and most important prints. The artist excelled in lithography; a hundred years ago his bold, persistent experimenting gave this medium an entirely new appearance just when the centennial of its invention was being marked in Europe. In fact, with the wealth of examples at the Metropolitan Museum, we now can celebrate the bicentennial of lithography through the works of Toulouse-Lautrec, the artist who virtually reinvented this medium.


The Private Collection of Edgar Degas

The Private Collection of Edgar Degas

The Private Collection of Edgar Degas by Ann Dumas

Abrams N | 1997 | ISBN: 0810965127 | 356 pages | PDF | 52.08MB


When Edgar Degas died in 1917, his heirs found crate after crate gathering dust in the rented rooms inhabited by the isolated old artist. The opened containers revealed one of the greatest personal art collections of all time: There were paintings, drawings, and prints by El Greco, Ingres, Delacroix, Daumier, Cassatt, Manet, van Gogh, Cézanne, and Degas himself, including the famous Bellelli Family, a work from his youth that Degas could never bear to part with. When his heirs auctioned off the collection in 1918, governments granted national museums special funds to make purchases, even though it was the height of World War I and money was tight. The museums, it turned out, were also aided by the war--on the day of the sale, cannon fire sent most bidders running for cover. The ones who remained got bargain prices. This gorgeous book is filled with color plates of many of the paintings, and its 14 thoughtful essays are invaluable to comprehending the tastes of a single artist, one with the eye and the wherewithal to put together such an amazing collection.


Degas: The Artist's Mind

Degas: The Artist's Mind

Degas: The Artist's Mind by Theodore Reff

Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1976 | ISBN: 0870991469 | 352 pages | 30.83MB


More than any other artist in the Impressionist group, Degas was fascinated by ideas and consciously based his work on them. "What I do is the result of reflection and study of the great masters," he once confessed, "of inspiration, spontaneity, temperament I know nothing." Yet his work has been understood very inadequately from that point of view. Publications on him, once dominated by memoirs inspired by his remarkable personality, are now concerned with cataloguing and studying limited aspects of his complex art. Its intellectual power and originality, which were evident to contemporary writers like Duranty and Valery, have not been studied sufficiently by more recent critics. It is this side of Degas's art—as seen in his ingenious pictorial strategies and technical innovations, his use of motifs like the window, the mirror, and the picture within the picture, his invention of striking, psychologically compelling compositions, and his creation of a sculptural idiom at once formal and vernacular—that is the subject of these essays. Inevitably, given the range of his intellectual interests, the essays are also concerned with his contacts with leading novelists and poets of his time and his efforts to illustrate or draw inspiration from their works. Throughout, the author makes use of an important, largely unpublished source, the material in Degas's notebooks, on which he has recently published a complete catalogue.


Romanticism and the School of Nature

Romanticism and the School of Nature

Romanticism and the School of Nature: Nineteenth-Century Drawings and Paintings from the Karen B Cohen Collection by Colta Ives, Elizabeth E Barker

Metropolitan Museum of Art | 2000 | ISBN: 0870999648 | 248 pages | PDF | 41.48MB


This publication presents one hundred and fifteen drawings and paintings from the holdings of Karen B. Cohen, a noted New York collector. These French and English nineteenth-century works include landscapes, portraits, figure compositions, and still lifes by great artists of the Romantic period, of the Barbizon School, and of the Realist School, beginning with Prud'hon and ending with Seurat. A varied range of compositions by such masters as Gericault, Corot, Rousseau, Couture, Daubigny, and especially Delacroix is included. Among the highlights is a group of oil paintings by Courbet—both landscapes and portraits—and a series of cloud studies by Constable. Because these pictures have been held for so long in private hands, most are little known today, despite the fact that they were made by noted masters. Many are published here for the first time, often with comparative illustrations.


Colta Ives conceived this publication and is its main author. She provides documentation and commentary for each work, placing it within the context of the artist's development and connecting it to contemporary artistic trends and innovations. Elizabeth E. Barker has contributed entries on Constable and Bonington.


The character of the images assembled is remarkable, reflecting the collector's personal response to the turbulent dramas of the Romantics, the fresh discovery of landscape by French and English painters of the School of Nature, and the somber realism of Courbet and his followers. Nearly all the artists represented were alternately damned and praised for their modernity, for they were eager to present the natural world in as vivid a way as possible. Their sensitive treatment of nature and of human life, frequently in a fluid, cursory style, was intended to elicit a heightened response from the viewer. For the most part ancient history and myth were left behind for the immediacy of the present. Romanticism and the School of Nature is also the story of an exceptional collector and her independent discoveries. This publication will accompany an exhibition shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from October 16, 2000, to January 21, 2001.


The History of Art: Painting from Giotto to the Present Day

The History of Art: Painting from Giotto to the Present Day

The History of Art: Painting from Giotto to the Present Day by A N Hodge

Arcturus | 2013 | ISBN: 1841936839 | 208 pages | PDF | 33.21MB


Great artists change the way we look at the world and this book is a beautifully illustrated summary of painting's greatest works. From the glories of the High Renaissance in Italy to the emotional visions of the Romantics, and from the groundbreaking techniques of the Impressionists to the radical canvases of the Abstract Expressionists, this book provides a fascinating look at the major movements in the history of Western painting. A clear chronological structure allows the reader to see each movement in its historical context, and to appreciate the patterns that emerged. The book includes more than 160 beautiful reproductions in color.