Einstein Was Right! by Karl Hess [PDF]

Einstein Was Right! by Karl Hess [PDF]
Einstein Was Right by Karl Hess
2014 | PDF | 1.69MB

All modern books on Einstein emphasize the genius of his relativity theory and the corresponding corrections and extensions of the ancient space–time concept. However, Einstein’s opposition to the use of probability in the laws of nature and particularly in the laws of quantum mechanics is criticized and often portrayed as outdated.

The author of Einstein Was Right! takes a unique view and shows that Einstein created a "Trojan horse" ready to unleash forces against the use of probability as a basis for the laws of nature. Einstein warned that the use of probability would, in the final analysis, lead to spooky actions and mysterious instantaneous influences at a distance. John Bell pulled Einstein’s Trojan horse into the castle of physics. He developed a theory that together with experimental results of Aspect, Zeilinger, and others "proves" the existence of quantum nonlocalities, or instantaneous influences. These have indeed the nature of what Einstein labeled spooky.

Einstein Was Right! shows that Bell was not aware of the special role that time and space–time play in any rigorous probability theory. As a consequence, his formalism is not general enough to be applied to the Aspect–Zeilinger type of experiments and his conclusions about the existence of instantaneous influences at a distance are incorrect. This fact suggests a worldview that is less optimistic about claims that teleportation and influences at a distance could open new horizons and provide the possibility of quantum computing. On the positive side, however, and as compensation, we are assured that the space–time picture of humankind developed over millions of years and perfected by Einstein is still able to cope with the phenomena that nature presents us on the atomic and sub-atomic level and that the "quantum weirdness" may be explainable and understandable after all.

Pythagoras: His Lives and the Legacy of a Rational Universe [EPUB]

Pythagoras: His Lives and the Legacy of a Rational Universe [EPUB]
Pythagoras: His Lives and the Legacy of a Rational Universe by Kitty Ferguson
2012 | EPUB | 3.51MB

This is the story of Pythagoras and the Pythagoreans, whose insights transformed the ancient world and still inspire the realms of science, mathematics, philosophy and the arts. Einstein said that the most incredible thing about our universe was that it was comprehensible at all.

As Kitty Ferguson explains, Pythagoras had much the same idea - but 2,500 years earlier. Though known by many only for his famous Theorem, in fact the pillars of our scientific tradition - belief that the universe is rational, that there is unity to all things, and that numbers and mathematics are a powerful guide to truth about nature and the cosmos - hark back to the convictions of this legendary scholar.

Kitty Ferguson brilliantly evokes Pythagoras' ancient world of, showing how ideas spread in antiquity, and chronicles the incredible influence he and his followers have had on so many extraordinary people in the history of Western thought and science.

See also: The Music of Pythagoras

Flying Dinosaurs: How Fearsome Reptiles Became Birds [EPUB]

Flying Dinosaurs: How Fearsome Reptiles Became Birds [EPUB]
Flying Dinosaurs: How Fearsome Reptiles Became Birds by John Pickrell
2014 | EPUB | 4.57MB

The discovery of stunning, feathered dinosaur fossils coming out of China since 2006 suggest that these creatures were much more bird-like than paleontologists previously imagined. Further evidence -- bones, genetics, eggs, behavior, and more -- has shown a seamless transition from fleet-footed carnivores to the ancestors of modern birds.

Mixing colorful portraits with news on the latest fossil findings and interviews with leading paleontologists in the United States, China, Europe, and Australia, John Pickrell explains and details dinosaurs' development of flight. This special capacity introduced a whole new range of abilities for the animals and helped them survive a mass extinction, when thousands of other dinosaur species that once populated the Earth did not. Pickrell also turns his journalistic eye toward the stories behind the latest discoveries, investigating the role of the Chinese black market in trading fossils, the controversies among various dinosaur hunters, the interference of national governments intent on protecting scientific information, and the race to publish findings first that make this research such a dynamic area of science.

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