Flight from Wonder [PDF]

Flight from Wonder [PDF]
Flight from Wonder: An Investigation of Scientific Creativity by Albert Rothenberg
2014 | PDF | 1.61MB

Flight from Wonder reports the findings from an empirical study of 45 Nobel laureates in science from the United States and Europe concerning the creative processes that produce scientific discoveries. To this end, Albert Rothenberg designed an interview procedure to delineate the content and sequences of processes that lead scientists to specific creative achievements. He conducted interviews with Nobel laureates in the fields of medicine, physiology, physics, and chemistry and carried out matching interviews with a control group consisting of twelve accomplished engineers on the faculty of a leading engineering university.

Rothenberg's results demonstrate that the Nobel laureates use three distinct cognitive creative processes to achieve key formulations and discoveries; the detailed nature and structure of these findings were reviewed by the Nobel laureates. To predict his findings, Rothenberg engaged with autobiographical accounts and work-in-progress manuscripts pertaining to the creative discoveries of outstanding scientists of the past including Albert Einstein, Charles Darwin, Max Planck, Neils Bohr, Hideki Yukawa, and James Watson. The book will interest students and general readers fascinated by creativity and the development of scientific inquiry and innovation.

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind [EPUB]

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind [EPUB]
Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari
2014 | EPUB | 13.78MB

From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.”

One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us?

Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas.

Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become?

Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

p53: The Gene that Cracked the Cancer Code [EPUB]

p53: The Gene that Cracked the Cancer Code [EPUB]
p53: The Gene that Cracked the Cancer Code by Sue Armstrong
2015 | EPUB | 0.4MB

All of us have lurking in our DNA a most remarkable gene. Its job is straightforward – to protect us from cancer. This gene – known simply as p53 – constantly scans our cells to ensure that they grow and divide without mishap, as part of the routine maintenance of our bodies. If a cell makes a mistake in copying its DNA as part of its process of division, p53 stops it in its tracks, sending in the repair team before allowing the cell to carry on dividing. If the mistake is irreparable and the rogue cell threatens to grow out of control (as happens in cancer), p53 commands the cell to commit suicide. Cancer cannot develop unless p53 itself is damaged and malfunctioning. Not surprisingly, p53 is the most studied gene in history.

Sue Armstrong's p53: The Gene That Cracked the Cancer Code is the story of the quest to unravel the mysteries of p53 and to get at the heart of what happens in our cells when they turn cancerous. Discovered in 1979, most notably by David Lane at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund in London and Arnie Levine at Princeton University, p53 has teased the minds of some of the most colorful and ambitious scientists around the world. As the twenty-first century revolution in personalized cancer treatments finally has started to take off, p53 is at the forefront of the hunt for new cures. This is a timely tale of scientific discovery and advances in our understanding of a disease that still affects more than one in three of us at some point in our lives.
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