Spare Parts: In Praise of Your Appendix and Other Unappreciated Organs [EPUB]

Spare Parts: In Praise of Your Appendix and Other Unappreciated Organs [EPUB]
Spare Parts: In Praise of Your Appendix and Other Unappreciated Organs by Carol Ann Rinzler
2017 | EPUB | 1.3MB

Charles Darwin considered them extraneous, but this witty book sheds moderns scientific light on the Darwin Six --appendix, tailbone, "third eyelid," wisdom teeth, external ear muscles, body hair -- once considered useless, now known to be both valuable and interesting, plus a chapter on the true "dispensables," parts with which we can indeed dispense. Along the way, best-selling author Rinzler weaves in Darwin's brilliant and ground-breaking theories of evolution and shares insights into what the human body may look like millennia from now.

Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History [EPUB]

Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History [EPUB]
Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History by Bill Schutt
2017 | EPUB | 5.61MB

For centuries scientists have written off cannibalism as a bizarre phenomenon with little biological significance. Its presence in nature was dismissed as a desperate response to starvation or other life-threatening circumstances, and few spent time studying it. A taboo subject in our culture, the behavior was portrayed mostly through horror movies or tabloids sensationalizing the crimes of real-life flesh-eaters. But the true nature of cannibalism--the role it plays in evolution as well as human history--is even more intriguing (and more normal) than the misconceptions we’ve come to accept as fact.

In Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History, zoologist Bill Schutt sets the record straight, debunking common myths and investigating our new understanding of cannibalism’s role in biology, anthropology, and history in the most fascinating account yet written on this complex topic. Schutt takes readers from Arizona’s Chiricahua Mountains, where he wades through ponds full of tadpoles devouring their siblings, to the Sierra Nevadas, where he joins researchers who are shedding new light on what happened to the Donner Party--the most infamous episode of cannibalism in American history. He even meets with an expert on the preparation and consumption of human placenta (and, yes, it goes well with Chianti).

Bringing together the latest cutting-edge science, Schutt answers questions such as why some amphibians consume their mother’s skin; why certain insects bite the heads off their partners after sex; why, up until the end of the twentieth century, Europeans regularly ate human body parts as medical curatives; and how cannibalism might be linked to the extinction of the Neanderthals. He takes us into the future as well, investigating whether, as climate change causes famine, disease, and overcrowding, we may see more outbreaks of cannibalism in many more species--including our own.

Cannibalism places a perfectly natural occurrence into a vital new context and invites us to explore why it both enthralls and repels us.

Citizen Science: How Ordinary People are Changing the Face of Discovery [EPUB]

Citizen Science: How Ordinary People are Changing the Face of Discovery [EPUB]
Citizen Science: How Ordinary People are Changing the Face of Discovery by Caren Cooper
2016 | EPUB | 1.46MB

The engaging history of the people whose contributions to scientific pursuits make us rethink the meaning of the word "scientist."

Think you need a degree in science to contribute to important scientific discoveries? Think again. All around the world, in fields ranging from astronomy to zoology, millions of everyday people are choosing to participate in the scientific process. Working in cooperation with scientists in pursuit of information, innovation, and discovery, these volunteers are following protocols, collecting and reviewing data, and sharing their observations. They are our neighbors, our in-laws, and people in the office down the hall. Their story, along with the story of the social good that can result from citizen science, has largely been untold, until now.

Citizen scientists are challenging old notions about who can conduct research, where knowledge can be acquired, and even how solutions to some of our biggest societal problems might emerge. In telling their story, Cooper will inspire readers to rethink their own assumptions about the role that individuals can play in gaining scientific understanding and putting that understanding to use as stewards of our world. Citizen Science will be a rallying call-to-arms, and will also function as an authoritative resource for those inspired by the featured stories and message.

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