Cells Are the New Cure: The Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs That Are Transforming Our Health [EPUB]

Cells Are the New Cure: The Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs That Are Transforming Our Health [EPUB]
Cells Are the New Cure: The Cutting-Edge Medical Breakthroughs That Are Transforming Our Health by Max Gomez, Robin L Smith
2017 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781944648800 | 17.95MB

The future of medicine is happening now.

Revolutionary new science is providing cures that were considered science fiction just a few years ago—and not with pills, surgery, or radiation, but with human cells.

Promising treatments now in extensive clinical trials could have dramatic impacts on cancer, autoimmune diseases, organ replacement, heart disease, and even aging itself. The key to these breakthroughs is the use of living cells as medicine instead of traditional drugs.

Discover the advances that are alleviating the effects of strokes, Alzheimer’s disease, and even allergies. Cells Are the New Cure takes you into the world of regenerative medicine, which enables doctors to repair injured and aging tissues and even create artificial body parts and organs in the lab. Cellular medicine experts Robin L. Smith, MD, and Max Gomez, PhD, outline the new technologies that make it possible to harness the immune system to fight cancer and reverse autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. CRISPR, a new technology for targeted gene editing, promises to eradicate genetic diseases, allowing us to live longer lives—possibly even beyond age 100 in good health.

Cells Are the New Cure takes you on a tour of the most exciting and cutting-edge developments in medicine. The content inside these pages could save your life or the life of someone you love.

Plato and the Nerd: The Creative Partnership of Humans and Technology [EPUB]

Plato and the Nerd: The Creative Partnership of Humans and Technology [EPUB]
Plato and the Nerd: The Creative Partnership of Humans and Technology by Edward Ashford Lee
2017 | EPUB | ISBN: 9780262036481 | 11.68MB

How humans and technology evolve together in a creative partnership.

In this book, Edward Ashford Lee makes a bold claim: that the creators of digital technology have an unsurpassed medium for creativity. Technology has advanced to the point where progress seems limited not by physical constraints but the human imagination. Writing for both literate technologists and numerate humanists, Lee makes a case for engineering -- creating technology -- as a deeply intellectual and fundamentally creative process. Explaining why digital technology has been so transformative and so liberating, Lee argues that the real power of technology stems from its partnership with humans.

Lee explores the ways that engineers use models and abstraction to build inventive artificial worlds and to give us things that we never dreamed of -- for example, the ability to carry in our pockets everything humans have ever published. But he also attempts to counter the runaway enthusiasm of some technology boosters who claim everything in the physical world is a computation -- that even such complex phenomena as human cognition are software operating on digital data. Lee argues that the evidence for this is weak, and the likelihood that nature has limited itself to processes that conform to today's notion of digital computation is remote.

Lee goes on to argue that artificial intelligence's goal of reproducing human cognitive functions in computers vastly underestimates the potential of computers. In his view, technology is coevolving with humans. It augments our cognitive and physical capabilities while we nurture, develop, and propagate the technology itself. Complementarity is more likely than competition.

The Story of Colour: An Exploration of the Hidden Messages of the Spectrum [EPUB]

The Story of Colour: An Exploration of the Hidden Messages of the Spectrum [EPUB]
The Story of Colour: An Exploration of the Hidden Messages of the Spectrum by Gavin Evans
2017 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781782436904 | 80.02MB

Why is green the colour of envy? Why is black 'evil'? Why is white pure? Why do we 'feel blue' or 'see red'? Why do colours have different meanings for different cultures?

When we look at or talk about a colour in a particular setting, we are as likely to see its cultural or symbolic meaning as the shade itself. Why?

Sometimes our grasp of a colour relates to the random way we define it. Light blue is called 'blue' but, over the last century or two, light red has become pink, whereas in Russia light blue and dark blue are separate colours. Does language play a part in our perception of colours?

In most cases, the origins of why we view a colour in a certain way goes back hundreds, if not thousands, of years. Blue was not always a boy's colour; pink was not always a girl's. Indeed, less than one hundred years ago, in the West, it was the other way round.

This book offers a lively, anecdotal treatment of the cultural mysteries of colour, and focuses on the way we respond to colours, the significance we give them - and how these things change over time and from place to place. It tells the story of how we have come to view the world through lenses passed down to us by art, science, politics, fashion, sport and, not least, prejudice.

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