Man, Interrupted: Why Young Men are Struggling & What We Can Do About It [EPUB]

Man, Interrupted: Why Young Men are Struggling & What We Can Do About It [EPUB]
Man, Interrupted: Why Young Men are Struggling & What We Can Do About It by Philip Zimbardo, Nikita Coulombe
2016 | EPUB | 1.58MB

In 2011, Philip Zimbardo gave a TED Talk called "The Demise of Guys," which has been viewed by over 1.8 million people. A TED eBook short followed that chronicled how in record numbers men are flaming out academically and failing socially and sexually with women.

This new book is an expansion of that brief polemic based on Zimbardo's observations, research, and the survey that was completed by over 20,000 viewers of the original TED Talk. The premise here is that we are facing a not-so-brave new world; a world in which young men are getting left behind. Philip Zimbardo and Nikita Coulombe say that an addiction to video games and online porn have created a generation of shy, socially awkward, emotionally removed, and risk-adverse young men who are unable (and unwilling) to navigate the complexities and risks inherent to real-life relationships, school, and employment. Taking a critical look at a problem that is tearing at families and societies everywhere, "Man, Interrupted" suggests that our young men are suffering from a new form of "arousal addiction," and introduce a bold new plan for getting them back on track.

The concluding chapters offer a set of solutions that can be affected by different segments of society including schools, parents, and young men themselves. Filled with telling anecdotes, results of fascinating research, perceptive analysis, and concrete suggestions for change, Man, Interrupted is a book for our time. It is a book that informs, challenges, and ultimately inspires.

Anatomy of a Secret Life: The Psychology of Living a Lie [EPUB]

Anatomy of a Secret Life: The Psychology of Living a Lie [EPUB]
Anatomy of a Secret Life: The Psychology of Living a Lie by Gail Saltz
2006 | EPUB | 0.2MB

What do these people have in common?

  • The traveling businessman who brings prostitutes back to his hotel room
  • The wealthy woman who is arrested for shoplifting
  • The seemingly happily married man who cruises gay clubs

They are all—despite differences in degree, gender, and age—living a double life, one of our most deeply ingrained, but poorly understood psychological drives. Now, Dr. Gail Saltz steps into the breach to explore —in detail and based on the latest research—our impulse to create and nurture alter egos.

Saltz reveals how assuming a different identity can be healthy and tremendously liberating. For proof, we need look no further than the innumerable people who reinvent themselves by moving to the big city, or the countless pseudonymous bloggers. But, as she also makes clear, leading a secret life comes with potentially serious psychological risks. She shows that, in more extreme cases, leading a secret life can have devastating emotional, social and familial consequences—both for the person leading the secret life, and for those close to him or her.

The definitive popular work on how a secret life is formed, lived, justified, and exposed, Saltz’s Anatomy includes contemporary case studies and historical examples (Lindbergh, T. E. Lawrence, Tchaikovsky, et cetera) of people who have risked it all for a taste of forbidden fruit.

Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose [EPUB]

Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose [EPUB]
Supernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purpose by Deirdre Barrett
2010 | EPUB | 1.27MB

A Harvard psychologist explains how our once-helpful instincts get hijacked in our garish modern world.

Our instincts―for food, sex, or territorial protection― evolved for life on the savannahs 10,000 years ago, not in today’s world of densely populated cities, technological innovations, and pollution. We now have access to a glut of larger-than-life objects, from candy to pornography to atomic weapons―that gratify these gut instincts with often-dangerous results. Animal biologists coined the term “supernormal stimuli” to describe imitations that appeal to primitive instincts and exert a stronger pull than real things, such as soccer balls that geese prefer over eggs.

Evolutionary psychologist Deirdre Barrett applies this concept to the alarming disconnect between human instinct and our created environment, demonstrating how supernormal stimuli are a major cause of today’s most pressing problems, including obesity and war. However, Barrett does more than show how unfettered instincts fuel dangerous excesses. She also reminds us that by exercising self-control we can rein them in, potentially saving ourselves and civilization.

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