The Rabbi's Brain: Mystics, Moderns, and the Science of Jewish Thinking [Audiobook]

The Rabbi's Brain: Mystics, Moderns, and the Science of Jewish Thinking [Audiobook]
The Rabbi's Brain: Mystics, Moderns, and the Science of Jewish Thinking [Audiobook] by Andrew Newberg, David Halpern, read by John Lescault
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 14 hours and 28 minutes | 394.41MB

The topic of neurotheology has garnered increasing attention in the academic, religious, scientific, and popular worlds. But there have been no attempts to explore more specifically how Jewish religious thought and experience may intersect with neurotheology. The Rabbi's Brain engages this groundbreaking area.

Topics included relate to a neurotheological approach to the foundational beliefs that arise from the Torah and associated scriptures, Jewish learning, an exploration of the different elements of Judaism (i.e., reform, conservative, and orthodox), an exploration of specifically Jewish practices (i.e., davening, Sabbath, kosher), and a review of Jewish mysticism. The Rabbi's Brain engages these topics in an easy-to-understand style and integrates the scientific, religious, philosophical, and theological aspects of the emerging field of neurotheology.

By reviewing the concepts in a stepwise, simple yet thorough discussion, listeners, regardless of their background, will be able to understand the complexities and breadth of neurotheology from the Jewish perspective. More broadly, issues will include a review of the neurosciences and neuroscientific techniques; religious and spiritual experiences; theological development and analysis; liturgy and ritual; epistemology, philosophy, and ethics; and social implications, all from the Jewish perspective.

Vatican I: The Council and the Making of the Ultramontane Church [Audiobook]

Vatican I: The Council and the Making of the Ultramontane Church [Audiobook]
Vatican I: The Council and the Making of the Ultramontane Church [Audiobook] by John W O'Malley, read by Matthew McAuliffe
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 8 hours and 20 minutes | 227.28MB

The enduring influence of the Catholic Church has many sources - its spiritual and intellectual appeal, missionary achievements, wealth, diplomatic effectiveness, and stable hierarchy. But in the first half of the 19th century, the foundations upon which the church had rested for centuries were shaken. In the eyes of many thoughtful people, liberalism in the guise of liberty, equality, and fraternity was the quintessence of the evils that shook those foundations. At the Vatican Council of 1869-1870, the church made a dramatic effort to set things right by defining the doctrine of papal infallibility.

In Vatican I: The Council and the Making of the Ultramontane Church, John W. O'Malley draws us into the bitter controversies over papal infallibility that at one point seemed destined to rend the church in two. Archbishop Henry Manning was the principal driving force for the definition, and Lord Acton was his brilliant counterpart on the other side. But they shrink in significance alongside Pope Pius IX, whose zeal for the definition was so notable that it raised questions about the very legitimacy of the council. Entering the fray were politicians such as Gladstone and Bismarck. The growing tension in the council played out within the larger drama of the seizure of the Papal States by Italian forces and its seemingly inevitable consequence, the conquest of Rome itself.

Largely as a result of the council and its aftermath, the Catholic Church became more pope-centered than ever before. In the terminology of the period, it became ultramontane.

The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will [Audiobook]

The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will [Audiobook]
The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will [Audiobook] by Kenneth R Miller, read by Fred Sanders
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 10 hours and 6 minutes | 277.83MB

A radical, optimistic exploration of how humans evolved to develop reason, consciousness, and free will.

Lately, the most passionate advocates of the theory of evolution seem to present it as bad news. Scientists such as Richard Dawkins, Lawrence Krauss, and Sam Harris tell us that our most intimate actions, thoughts, and values are mere byproducts of thousands of generations of mindless adaptation. We are just one species among multitudes and therefore no more significant than any other living creature.

Now comes Brown University biologist Kenneth R. Miller to make the case that this view betrays a gross misunderstanding of evolution. Natural selection surely explains how our bodies and brains were shaped, but Miller argues that it's not a social or cultural theory of everything. In The Human Instinct, he rejects the idea that our biological heritage means that human thought, action, and imagination are predetermined, describing instead the trajectory that ultimately gave us reason, consciousness, and free will. A proper understanding of evolution, he says, reveals humankind in its glorious uniqueness - one foot planted firmly among all of the creatures we've evolved alongside and the other in the special place of self-awareness and understanding that we alone occupy in the universe.

Equal parts natural science and philosophy, The Human Instinct is a moving and powerful celebration of what it means to be human.

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