The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will [Audiobook]

The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will [Audiobook]
The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness, and Free Will [Audiobook] by Kenneth R Miller, read by Fred Sanders
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 10 hours and 6 minutes | 277.83MB

A radical, optimistic exploration of how humans evolved to develop reason, consciousness, and free will.

Lately, the most passionate advocates of the theory of evolution seem to present it as bad news. Scientists such as Richard Dawkins, Lawrence Krauss, and Sam Harris tell us that our most intimate actions, thoughts, and values are mere byproducts of thousands of generations of mindless adaptation. We are just one species among multitudes and therefore no more significant than any other living creature.

Now comes Brown University biologist Kenneth R. Miller to make the case that this view betrays a gross misunderstanding of evolution. Natural selection surely explains how our bodies and brains were shaped, but Miller argues that it's not a social or cultural theory of everything. In The Human Instinct, he rejects the idea that our biological heritage means that human thought, action, and imagination are predetermined, describing instead the trajectory that ultimately gave us reason, consciousness, and free will. A proper understanding of evolution, he says, reveals humankind in its glorious uniqueness - one foot planted firmly among all of the creatures we've evolved alongside and the other in the special place of self-awareness and understanding that we alone occupy in the universe.

Equal parts natural science and philosophy, The Human Instinct is a moving and powerful celebration of what it means to be human.

How to Die: An Ancient Guide to the End of Life [Audiobook]

How to Die: An Ancient Guide to the End of Life [Audiobook]
How to Die: An Ancient Guide to the End of Life [Audiobook] by Seneca, edited and translated by James S Romm, read by P J Ochlan
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 2 hours and 29 minutes | 68.72MB

"It takes an entire lifetime to learn how to die", wrote the Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca (c. 4 BC-65 AD). He counseled readers to "study death always", and took his own advice, returning to the subject again and again in all his writings, yet he never treated it in a complete work. How to Die gathers in one volume, for the first time, Seneca's remarkable meditations on death and dying. Edited and translated by James S. Romm, How to Die reveals a provocative thinker and dazzling writer who speaks with a startling frankness about the need to accept death or even, under certain conditions, to seek it out.

Seneca believed that life is only a journey toward death and that one must rehearse for death throughout life. Here, he tells us how to practice for death, how to die well, and how to understand the role of a good death in a good life. He stresses the universality of death, its importance as life's final rite of passage, and its ability to liberate us from pain, slavery, or political oppression.

Featuring beautifully rendered new translations, How to Die also includes an enlightening introduction, notes, the original Latin texts, and an epilogue presenting Tacitus's description of Seneca's grim suicide.

Kantian Reason and Hegelian Spirit: The Idealistic Logic of Modern Theology [Audiobook]

Kantian Reason and Hegelian Spirit: The Idealistic Logic of Modern Theology [Audiobook]
Kantian Reason and Hegelian Spirit: The Idealistic Logic of Modern Theology [Audiobook] by Gary Dorrien, read by Robert King Ross
2013 | M4B@64 kbps + PDF | 35 hrs 35 mins | 968.85MB

What role, if any, did Immanuel Kant and post-Kantian idealists such as Hegel play in shaping modern theology?

In Kantian Reason and Hegelian Spirit , noted theologian Gary Dorrien argues that Kantian and post-Kantian idealism were instrumental in the foundation and development of modern Christian theology. In this thought-provoking new work, Dorrien contends that while pre-Kantian rationalism offered a critique of religion's authority, it held no theory about the creative powers of mind, nor about the spiritual ground and unifying reality of freedom. As Kant provided both of these, he can be considered the originator of modern religious thought. Dorrien reveals how the post-Kantian idealists also played an important role, by fashioning other forms of liberal religious thought through alternative solutions to the Kantian problems of subjectivity and dualism.

Dorrien carefully dissects Kant's three critiques of reason and his moral conception of religion, and analyses the alternatives to Kant offered by Schleiermacher, Schelling, Hegel, and others. Dorrien goes on to provide a substantial account of the development of liberal theology in Britain , and the thought of Paul Tillich and Karl Barth, showing how these, as well as the dominant traditions of German liberal theology, and even the powerful critiques of liberal religious idealism proffered by Kierkegaard and the left-Hegelian school, were rooted in Kantian or post-Kantian idealism. Presenting these notoriously difficult arguments in a wonderfully lucid and accessible manner, Dorrien solidifies his reputation as a pre-eminent social ethicist. Kantian Reason and Hegelian Spirit offers deeply illuminating insights into the impact of 19 th -century philosophical idealism on contemporary religious thought.

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