My Journey into the Heart of Terror: Ten Days in the Islamic State [EPUB]

My Journey into the Heart of Terror: Ten Days in the Islamic State [EPUB]
My Journey into the Heart of Terror: Ten Days in the Islamic State by Jürgen Todenhöfer
2016 | EPUB | 5.35MB

An alarming and enlightening first-hand account of what’s really going on behind the borders of the Islamic State.

ISIS, IS, the ISLAMIC State. It's an organization that has taken on chilling associations due to the horrific deeds committed in its name. ISIS beheads journalists—and yet one, Jürgen Todenhöfer, was invited to visit its fighters in Mosul, after months of negotiations. Accompanied by his son, Frederic Todenhöfer, who photographed the journey, he asked them to explain their beliefs, motivations, and goals. This book, the most in-depth research conducted on the terror group so far, is the result of those conversations. My Journey into the Heart of Terror shows how the organization grew from its al-Qaeda roots and the role the West has played, both past and present. Along the way, Todenhöfer offers startling insights into what ISIS thinks, what it wants—and how it can be defeated. Only by understanding our enemies, Todenhöfer believes, can we combat ISIS’s radical, un-Islamic vision and the terror and destruction it brings.

The Big Truck That Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster [EPUB]

The Big Truck That Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster [EPUB]
The Big Truck That Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster by Jonathan M Katz
2013 | EPUB | 3.07MB

On January 12, 2010, the deadliest earthquake in the history of the Western Hemisphere struck the nation least prepared to handle one. Jonathan M. Katz, the only full-time American news correspondent in Haiti, was inside his house when it buckled along with hundreds of thousands of others. In this visceral first-hand account, Katz takes readers inside the terror of that day, the devastation visited on ordinary Haitians, and through the monumental--yet misbegotten--rescue effort that followed.

More than half of American adults gave money for Haiti, part of a global response that reached $16.3 billion in pledges. But three years later the effort has foundered. Its most important promises--to rebuild safer cities, alleviate severe poverty, and strengthen Haiti to face future disasters--remain unfulfilled. How did so much generosity amount to so little? What went wrong?

The Big Truck That Went By presents a hard hitting investigation into international aid, finding that the way wealthy countries give today makes poor countries seem irredeemably hopeless, while trapping millions in cycles of privation and catastrophe. Katz follows the money to uncover startling truths about how good intentions go wrong, and what can be done to make aid "smarter."

Reporting at the side of Bill Clinton, Wyclef Jean, Sean Penn, Haiti's leaders and people, Katz also creates a complex, darkly funny, and unexpected portrait of one of the world's most fascinating countries. The Big Truck That Went By is not only a definitive account of Haiti's earthquake, but of the world we live in today.

The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia [EPUB]

The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia [EPUB]
The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia by Tim Judah
2008 | EPUB | 1.67MB

Who are the Serbs? Branded by some as Europe's new Nazis, they are seen by others—and by themselves—as the innocent victims of nationalist aggression and of an implacably hostile world media. In this challenging new book, Timothy Judah, who covered the war years in former Yugoslavia for the London Times and the Economist, argues that neither is true. Exploring the Serbian nation from the great epics of its past to the battlefields of Bosnia and the backstreets of Kosovo, he sets the fate of the Serbs within the story of their past.

This wide-ranging, scholarly, and highly readable account opens with the windswept fortresses of medieval kings and a battle lost more than six centuries ago that still profoundly influences the Serbs. Judah describes the idea of "Serbdom" that sustained them during centuries of Ottoman rule, the days of glory during the First World War, and the genocide against them during the Second. He examines the tenuous ethnic balance fashioned by Tito and its unraveling after his death. And he reveals how Slobodan Milosevic, later to become president, used a version of history to drive his people to nationalist euphoria. Judah details the way Milosevic prepared for war and provides gripping eyewitness accounts of wartime horrors: the burning villages and "ethnic cleansing," the ignominy of the siege of Sarajevo, and the columns of bedraggled Serb refugees, cynically manipulated and then abandoned once the dream of a Greater Serbia was lost.

This first in-depth account of life behind Serbian lines is not an apologia but a scrupulous explanation of how the people of a modernizing European state could become among the most reviled of the century. Rejecting the stereotypical image of a bloodthirsty nation, Judah makes the Serbs comprehensible by placing them within the context of their history and their hopes.

pages: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11
*10: 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80