A Death on Diamond Mountain: A True Story of Obsession, Madness, and the Path to Enlightenment [EPUB]

A Death on Diamond Mountain: A True Story of Obsession, Madness, and the Path to Enlightenment [EPUB]
A Death on Diamond Mountain: A True Story of Obsession, Madness, and the Path to Enlightenment by Scott Carney
2015 | EPUB | 0.4MB

An investigative reporter explores an infamous case where an obsessive and unorthodox search for enlightenment went terribly wrong.

When thirty-eight-year-old Ian Thorson died from dehydration and dysentery on a remote Arizona mountaintop in 2012, The New York Times reported the story under the headline: "Mysterious Buddhist Retreat in the Desert Ends in a Grisly Death." Scott Carney, a journalist and anthropologist who lived in India for six years, was struck by how Thorson’s death echoed other incidents that reflected the little-talked-about connection between intensive meditation and mental instability.

Using these tragedies as a springboard, Carney explores how those who go to extremes to achieve divine revelations—and undertake it in illusory ways—can tangle with madness. He also delves into the unorthodox interpretation of Tibetan Buddhism that attracted Thorson and the bizarre teachings of its chief evangelists: Thorson’s wife, Lama Christie McNally, and her previous husband, Geshe Michael Roach, the supreme spiritual leader of Diamond Mountain University, where Thorson died.

Carney unravels how the cultlike practices of McNally and Roach and the questionable circumstances surrounding Thorson’s death illuminate a uniquely American tendency to mix and match eastern religious traditions like LEGO pieces in a quest to reach an enlightened, perfected state, no matter the cost.

Aided by Thorson’s private papers, along with cutting-edge neurological research that reveals the profound impact of intensive meditation on the brain and stories of miracles and black magic, sexualized rituals, and tantric rites from former Diamond Mountain acolytes, A Death on Diamond Mountain is a gripping work of investigative journalism that reveals how the path to enlightenment can be riddled with danger.

Am I Sane Yet?: An Insider's Look at Mental Illness [EPUB]

Am I Sane Yet?: An Insider's Look at Mental Illness [EPUB]
Am I Sane Yet: An Insider's Look at Mental Illness by John Scully
2013 | EPUB | 1.69MB

Mental illness doesn’t have to be a prison sentence.

International award-winning journalist John Scully has been committed to mental institutions seven times. He has been locked up. He has attempted suicide. He has been diagnosed with severe depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. During this time, he has held down leading jobs with world broadcasters.

Am I Sane Yet? is essential reading for patients already suffering from depression, as well as for their relatives and friends. It is also a must for those who are hiding their depression because of the stigma that continues to haunt the mentally ill.

With brutal frankness Scully reveals the plight of patients he has met on the inside and investigates the therapies and drugs they have been given to try to ease their pain.

Among the Bankers: A Journey into the Heart of Finance [EPUB]

Among the Bankers: A Journey into the Heart of Finance [EPUB]
Among the Bankers: A Journey into the Heart of Finance by Joris Luyendijk
2016 | EPUB | 2.1MB

Joris Luyendijk, an investigative journalist, knew as much about banking as the average person: almost nothing. Bankers, he thought, were ruthless, competitive, bonus-obsessed sharks, irrelevant to his life. And then he was assigned to investigate the financial sector.

Joris immersed himself in the City—London’s equivalent of Wall Street—for several years, speaking to over 200 people—from the competitive investment bankers and elite hedge-fund managers to downtrodden back-office staff, reviled HR managers, and those made redundant in the regular 'culls'. Breaking the strictly imposed code of secrecy and silence, these insiders spoke on record about what they actually do all day, how they see the toxic environment in which they work, and how they think the uninitiated see them. They confessed to feeling overwhelmed by the intransparency of our financial systems. They admitted that when Lehman Brothers went down in 2008 they hoarded food, put their money in gold, and prepared to evacuate their children to the countryside. They agreed that nothing has changed since the crash.

A strange thing happens when you spend time among the bankers . . . you start to sympathize with them. What if the bankers themselves aren't the real enemy? What if the truth about global finance is more sinister than that?

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