Television Series of the 1970s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details [EPUB]

Television Series of the 1970s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details [EPUB]
Television Series of the 1970s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details by Vincent Terrace
2017 | EPUB | 10.76MB

Television of the 1970s reflected the shifting attitudes of the nation, as more shows attempted to represent social changes across the country. Edgier programs like All in the Family and M*A*S*H pushed the boundaries of popular programming to become standards of quality viewing. At the same time, the small screen began to acknowledge that viewers were open to more diverse programming, resulting in hit shows like Sanford and Son and Good Times. Some of the most beloved shows of all time originally aired during the 1970s, including Columbo, Happy Days, Little House on the Prairie, and The Mary Tyler Moore Show. Even after these shows departed the airwaves, they live on in syndication and on DVDs, entertaining many generations of viewers.

In Television Series of the 1970s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details, Vincent Terrace presents readers with a cornucopia of information about more than seventy programs from the decade. For example, did you know that Jim Ignatowski on Taxi attended Harvard? Or that John-Boy Walton was a reporter for the Jefferson County Times? Or that Lieutenant Columbo’s favorite sandwich was peanut butter and raisins? These are just a handful of hundreds of fun and intriguing specifics found inside this volume. Programs from all three major networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC)—as well as select syndicated programs—are represented here.

This is not a book of opinions or essays about specific television programs but a treasure trove of facts associated with each show. From Oscar Madison’s middle name on The Odd Couple to Jim Rockford’s license plate number, readers will discover a wealth of fascinating information that, for the most part, cannot be found elsewhere. In some cases, the factual data detailed herein is the only such documentation that currently exists on bygone shows of the era. Television Series of the 1970s is the ideal reference for fans of this decade and anyone looking to stump even the most knowledgeable trivia expert.

Television Series of the 1960s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details [EPUB]

Television Series of the 1960s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details [EPUB]
Television Series of the 1960s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details by Vincent Terrace
2017 | EPUB | 10.28MB

By 1960, watching television had become the pastime of millions of viewers around the world. Week after week, audiences tuned in to watch their favorite programs and catch up with their favorite characters. During the 1960s, some of the most beloved shows of all time originally aired, including The Andy Griffith Show, The Fugitive, Get Smart, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., and The Wild, Wild West. Even after these shows departed the airwaves, they lived on in syndication, entertaining several generations of viewers. Devoted and casual fans alike can probably remember basic facts about these shows—like the name of Rob Petrie’s boss on The Dick Van Dyke Show or the original captain of the USS Enterprise—but more obscure facts, like Barney Fife’s middle name, might be harder to recall.

In Television Series of the 1960s: Essential Facts and Quirky Details, Vincent Terrace presents readers with a cornucopia of information about more than seventy-five programs from the decade. For example, did you know that on The Addams Family, Lurch’s mother wanted him to become a jockey? Or that on The Avengers, John Steed had a pet dog named Freckles? Or that Patty and Cathy Lane of The Patty Duke Show had a distant cousin named Betsy Lane? These are but a few of the hundreds of fun and intriguing specifics contained within this volume. Shows from all three major networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC)—as well as select syndicated programs—are represented here.

This is not a book of opinions or essays about specific television programs but a treasure trove of the facts associated with each of these programs. From Mister Ed’s social security number to the zip code for Hooterville on Green Acres, readers will discover a wealth of fascinating information that, for the most part, cannot be found anywhere else. In some cases, the factual data detailed herein is the only such documentation that exists. Television Series of the 1960s is the ideal reference for fans of this decade and anyone looking to stump even the most knowledgeable trivia expert.

A Grammar of Cinepoiesis: Poetic Cameras of Italian Cinema [EPUB]

A Grammar of Cinepoiesis: Poetic Cameras of Italian Cinema [EPUB]
A Grammar of Cinepoiesis: Poetic Cameras of Italian Cinema by Silvia Carlorosi
2015 | EPUB | 1.33MB

Cinepoiesis, or cinema of poetry, strikes us as a strange combination, a phrase we initially read as an oxymoron. Poetry is often associated with the abstract and the evocative, while cinema suggests the concrete and the visible. Yet, various visual media use strong and often contradictory images, whose symbolic force and visual impact stimulate the public’s attention. Abstract and emblematic images surround us, and the poetic nature of these images lies in the way they speak beyond their apparent limits and stimulate connections on a subjective level. A prosaic world like the contemporary one, though, no longer seems to hold a place for poetry. We are inundated by the need to tell and to be told, the need to build our lives through narratives. But it is precisely here, in this contemporary landscape, that the cinema of poetry attempts to establish a space for itself, exchanging the productive and industrial apparatus for the poetic stimulus of a sensory experience.

A Grammar of Cinepoiesis is a theoretical and practical guide to the cinema of poetry, to its tools and forms. It examines how the language of a “cinema of poetry” works both in its theoretical foundations and in its modes of representation, and how it takes shape in the exemplary practice of Italian authors such as Pier Paolo Pasolini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Federico Fellini, and the more recent Franco Piavoli and Matteo Garrone.

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