Escape Velocity: American Science Fiction Film, 19501982 [EPUB]

Escape Velocity: American Science Fiction Film, 19501982 [EPUB]
Escape Velocity: American Science Fiction Film, 19501982 by Bradley Schauer
2017 | EPUB | 7.73MB

Today, movie theaters are packed with audiences of all ages marveling to exciting science fiction blockbusters, many of which are also critically acclaimed. However, when the science fiction film genre first emerged in the 1950s, it was represented largely by exploitation horror filmslurid, culturally disreputable, and appealing to a niche audience of children and sci-fi buffs. How did the genre evolve from B-movie to blockbuster?

Escape Velocity charts the historical trajectory of American science fiction cinema, explaining how the genre transitioned from eerie low-budget horror like It Came from Outer Space to art films like Slaughterhouse-Five, and finally to the extraordinary popularity of hits like E.T. Bradley Schauer draws on primary sources such as internal studio documents, promotional materials, and film reviews to explain the process of cultural, aesthetic, and economic legitimation that occurred between the 1950s and 1980s, as pulp science fiction tropes were adapted to suit the tastes of mainstream audiences.

Considering the inescapable dominance of todays effects-driven blockbusters, Escape Velocity not only charts the history of science fiction film, but also gives an account of the origins of contemporary Hollywood.

Hitchcock's Objects As Subjects: The Significance of Things on Screen [EPUB]

Hitchcock's Objects As Subjects: The Significance of Things on Screen [EPUB]
Hitchcock's Objects As Subjects: The Significance of Things on Screen by Marc Raymond Strauss
2015 | EPUB | 3.62MB

Alfred Hitchcock's imperative was to charge the screen with emotion. Subject matter and acting were, for him, subordinate to "all of the technical aspects that made the audience scream." Focusing on onscreen objects in Hitchcock's films, this study examines staircases, eyeglasses, lamps, doors, candles, cigarettes, buildings, monuments, statues and dozens of other props that the director treated as subjective protagonists, their roles nearly equal to the actors'. Examining each of the director's 52 extant films, this book provides a comprehensive exploration of Hitchcock's treatment of objects as subjects.

The Tenth Muse: Writing about Cinema in the Modernist Period [EPUB]

The Tenth Muse: Writing about Cinema in the Modernist Period [EPUB]
The Tenth Muse: Writing about Cinema in the Modernist Period by Laura Marcus
2008 | EPUB | 4.08MB

The Tenth Muse explores writings on the cinema in the first decades of the twentieth century. Laura Marcus examines the impact of cinema on early twentieth-century literary and, more broadly, aesthetic and cultural consciousness, by bringing together the study of the terms and strategies of early writings about film with literary engagement with cinema in the same period. She gives a new understanding of the ways in which early writers about film - reviewers, critics, theorists - developed aesthetic categories to define and accommodate what was called 'the seventh art' or 'the tenth muse' and found discursive strategies adequate to the representation of the new art and technology of cinema, with its unprecedented powers of movement.

In examining the writings of early film critics and commentators in tandem with those of more specifically literary figures, including H.G.Wells and Virginia Woolf, and in bringing literary texts into this field, Laura Marcus provides a new account of relationships between cinema and literature. Intertwining two major strands of research - the exploration of early film criticism and theory and cinema's presence in literary texts - The Tenth Muse shows how issues central to an understanding of cinema (including questions of time, repetition, movement, vision, sound and silence) are threaded through both kinds of writing, and the ways in which discursive and fictional writings overlapped.

The movement that defined cinema was also perceived as a more fragile and unstable ephemerality that inhered at every level, from the fleeting nature of the projected images to the vagaries of cinematic exhibition. It was the anxiety over the mutability of the medium and its exhibition which, from the 1920s onwards, led to the establishment of such institutional spaces for cinema as the London-based Film Society, the new film journals, and, in the 1930s, the first film archives. The Tenth Muse explores the continuities between these sites of cinematic culture and the conceptual, literary and philosophical understandings of the filmic medium.

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