The Blood of Lambs [EPUB]

The Blood of Lambs [EPUB]
The Blood of Lambs: A Former Terrorist's Memoir of Death and Redemption by Kamal Saleem with Lynn Vincent
2010 | EPUB | 447.56KB

The Blood of Lambs reveals the true inside story of the life and mindset of a radical muslim terrorist who finally came to renounce his murderous mission and embrace freedom.

Some radical Muslims believe that non-Muslims who refuse to convert must die. The Blood of Lambs is the true account of the life of such a terrorist who has since renounced his deadly participation in jihad, or “holy war.” His memoir conveys an urgent message to Americans to wake up to the dangers of the terrorists who are still executing their harmful and destructive schemes.

Kamal Saleem was born under a different name into a Sunni Muslim family in Lebanon. From a young age he was taught that the loftiest accomplishment he could achieve in life was to be martyred while killing infidels, namely Christians, Jews, and Americans. At age seven, he was recruited by the Muslim Brotherhood and entered an assault camp where members of al-Assifa, the armed branch of Fatah, trained for terror missions against Israel. After years of training, Saleem operatedin successful terror campaigns funded by the Muslim Brotherhood, the Palestinian Liberation Organization, and wealthy oil sheikhs. He infiltrated the United States with the sole purpose of converting others to radical Islam.

However, a life-changing event caused him to reevaluate his worldview. Kamal came to know three kind Christian men, and through them he saw the love of God—eventually coming to know their God as well. As a result of their love andsacrificial giving, Kamal acknowledged his need for Christ as Savior. The Blood of Lambs is his riveting story that attests to the power of love and freedom.

Home Front Girl [EPUB]

Home Front Girl [EPUB]
Home Front Girl: A Diary of Love, Literature, and Growing Up in Wartime America by Joan Wehlen Morrison, edited by Susan Signe Morrison
2012 | EPUB | 1.97MB
Wednesday, December 10, 1941
“Hitler speaks to Reichstag tomorrow. We just heard the first casualty lists over the radio. . . . Lots of boys from Michigan and Illinois. Oh my God! . . . Life goes on though. We read our books in the library and eat lunch, bridge, etc. Phy. Sci. and Calculus. Darn Descartes. Reading Walt Whitman now.”

This diary of a smart, astute, and funny teenager provides a fascinating record of what an everyday American girl felt and thought during the Depression and the lead-up to World War II. Young Chicagoan Joan Wehlen describes her daily life growing up in the city and ruminates about the impending war, daily headlines, and major touchstones of the era—FDR’s radio addresses, the Lindbergh kidnapping, Goodbye Mr. Chips and Citizen Kane, Churchill and Hitler, war work and Red Cross meetings. Included are Joan’s charming doodles of her latest dress or haircut reflective of the era. Home Front Girl is not only an entertaining and delightful read but an important primary source—a vivid account of a real American girl’s lived experiences.

The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter [EPUB]

The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter [EPUB]
The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter: A Portrait of Descartes by Steven Nadler
2013 | EPUB | 5.18MB

In the Louvre museum hangs a portrait of a middle-aged man with long dark hair, a mustache, and heavy-lidded eyes, and he is dressed in the starched white collar and black coat of the typical Dutch burgher. The painting is now the iconic image of René Descartes, the great seventeenth-century French philosopher. And the painter of the work? The Dutch master Frans Hals--or so it was long believed, until the work was downgraded to a copy of an original. But where, then, is the authentic version located, and who painted it? Is the man in the painting--and in its original--really Descartes?

A unique combination of philosophy, biography, and art history, The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter investigates the remarkable individuals and circumstances behind a small portrait. Through this image--and the intersecting lives of a brilliant philosopher, a Catholic priest, and a gifted painter--Steven Nadler opens up a fascinating portal into Descartes's life and times, skillfully presenting an accessible introduction to Descartes's philosophical and scientific ideas, and an illuminating tour of the volatile political and religious environment of the Dutch Golden Age. As Nadler shows, Descartes's innovative ideas about the world, about human nature and knowledge, and about philosophy itself, stirred great controversy. Philosophical and theological critics vigorously opposed his views, and civil and ecclesiastic authorities condemned his writings. Nevertheless, Descartes's thought came to dominate the philosophical world of the period, and can rightly be called the philosophy of the seventeenth century.

Shedding light on a well-known image, The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter offers an engaging exploration of a celebrated philosopher's world and work.

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