See No Evil: The True Story of a Ground Soldier in the CIA's War on Terrorism [EPUB]

See No Evil: The True Story of a Ground Soldier in the CIA's War on Terrorism [EPUB]
See No Evil: The True Story of a Ground Soldier in the CIA's War on Terrorism by Robert Baer
2003 | EPUB | 3.89MB

See No Evil is the astonishing and controversial memoir from one of the CIA's top field officers of the past quarter century. Robert Baer recounts his career as a ground soldier in the CIA's war on terrorism, running agents in the back alleys of the Middle East, with blistering honesty. He paints a chilling picture of how terrorism works on the inside and provides compelling evidence about how Washington sabotaged the CIA's efforts to root out the world's deadliest terrorists. See No Evil is an unprecedented examination of the roots of modern terrorism and the CIA's failure to acknowledge and neutralise the growing fundamentalist threat, and an engrossing memoir of Baer's education as an intelligence operative.

See No Evil includes revelations about the strategic alliance Osama bin Laden forged with Iran in 1996 to mastermind terrorist attacks on the United States and elsewhere, about the planned coup d'etat against Saddam Hussein and how it was aborted by the National Security Council, and about the CIA's disastrous decision in 1991 to shut down its operations in Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia, ignoring the fundamentalists working in those countries.

An extraordinary testimony that has become even more vital and damning since the events of 9/11 and the subsequent War on Iraq.

Walking Free [EPUB]

Walking Free [EPUB]
Walking Free by Munjed Al Muderis
2014 | EPUB | 8.18MB

In 1999, Munjed Al Muderis was a young surgical resident working in Baghdad when a squad of Military Police marched into the operating theatre and ordered the surgical team to mutilate the ears of three busloads of army deserters. When the head of surgery refused, he was executed in front of his staff. Munjed's choices were stark-comply and breach the medical oath 'do no harm', refuse and face certain death, or flee.

That day, Munjed's life changed forever. He escaped to Indonesia, where he boarded a filthy, overcrowded refugee boat, bound for Australia.

Like his fellow passengers, he hoped for a new life, free from fear and oppression, but for ten months he was incarcerated in what became known as the worst of the refugee camps, Curtin Detention Centre in Western Australia. There he was known only by a number, locked in solitary confinement and repeatedly told to go back to Iraq.

On 26 August 2000, Munjed was finally freed. Now, fourteen years later, he is one of the world's leading osseointegration surgeons, transforming the lives of amputees with a pioneering technique that allows them to walk again.

Walking Free is Munjed's extraordinary account of his journey from the brutality of Saddam Hussein's Iraq to a new life in Australia and a remarkable career at the forefront of medicine.

Dead as Doornails [EPUB]

Dead as Doornails [EPUB]
Dead as Doornails by Anthony Cronin
2011 | EPUB | 0.23MB

This reissue of Dead as Doornails, first published in 1976, brings back into print a true classic of Irish memoir.

Anthony Cronin's account of life in post-war literary Dublin is as funny and colourful as one would expect from an intimate of Brendan Behan, Patrick Kavanagh and Myles na Gopaleen; but it is also a clear-eyed and bracing antidote to the kitsch that passes for literary history and memory in the Dublin of today. Cronin writes with remarkable subtlety of the frustrations and pathologies of this generation: the excess of drink, the shortage of sex, the insecurity and begrudgery, the painful limitations of cultural life, and the bittersweet pull of exile.

We read of a comical sojourn in France with Behan, and of Cronin's years in London as a literary editor and a friend of the writer Julian Maclaren-Ross and the painters Robert MacBryde and Robert Colquhoun. The generation chronicled by Cronin was one of wasted promise. That waste is redressed through the shimmering prose of Dead as Doornails, which has earned its place in Irish literary history alongside the best works of Behan, Kavanagh and Myles.

pages: 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170
*100: 100 200 300