Down to the Wire: Confronting Climate Collapse [Audiobook]

Down to the Wire: Confronting Climate Collapse [Audiobook]
Down to the Wire: Confronting Climate Collapse [Audiobook] by David W Orr, read by Barry Abrams
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 8 hours and 44 minutes | 238.33MB

Down to the Wire is a sober and eloquent assessment of climate destabilization and an urgent call to action. David Orr describes how political negligence, an economy based on the insatiable consumption of trivial goods, and a disdain for the well-being of future generations have brought us to the tipping point that biologist Edward O. Wilson calls "[T]he bottleneck".

Due to our refusal to live within natural limits, we now face a long emergency of rising temperatures, rising sea-levels, and a host of other related problems that will increasingly undermine human civilization. Climate destabilization to which we are already committed will change everything, and to those betting on quick technological fixes or minor adjustments to the way we live now, Down to the Wire is a major wake-up call.

But this is not a doomsday audiobook. Orr offers a wide range of pragmatic, far-reaching proposals - some of which have already been adopted by the Obama administration - for how we might reconnect public policy with rigorous science, bring our economy into alignment with ecological realities, and begin to regard ourselves as planetary trustees for future generations. He offers inspiring real-life examples of people already responding to the major threat to our future.

Exoplanets: Hidden Worlds and the Quest for Extraterrestrial Life [Audiobook]

Exoplanets: Hidden Worlds and the Quest for Extraterrestrial Life [Audiobook]
Exoplanets: Hidden Worlds and the Quest for Extraterrestrial Life [Audiobook] by Donald Goldsmith, read by Peter Noble
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 7 hours and 52 minutes | 214.8MB

Astronomers have recently discovered thousands of planets that orbit stars throughout the Milky Way. Much of what has captured the imagination of planetary scientists and the public is the unexpected strangeness of these distant worlds. The sizes, masses, and orbits of exoplanets detected so far raise new questions about how planets form and evolve. Still more tantalizing are the efforts to determine which exoplanets might support life.

Astronomers are steadily improving their means of examining these planets, using advanced spacecraft sent into orbits a million miles from Earth. These instruments will provide better observations of these planetary systems, which are nestled close enough to their dim red stars to maintain Earth-like temperatures.

The quest to find other worlds brims with possibility, and Donald Goldsmith presents the science of exoplanets and the search for extraterrestrial life in a way that even Earthlings with little to no background in astronomy or astrophysics can understand and enjoy.

One of Ten Billion Earths: How We Learn About Our Planet's Past and Future from Distant Exoplanets [Audiobook]

One of Ten Billion Earths: How We Learn About Our Planet's Past and Future from Distant Exoplanets [Audiobook]
One of Ten Billion Earths: How We Learn About Our Planet's Past and Future from Distant Exoplanets [Audiobook] by Karel Schrijver, read by Steve Menasche
2018 | M4B@64 kbps | 14 hours and 44 minutes | 401.69MB

This audiobook explores how the discoveries within the Solar System and of exoplanets far beyond it come together to help us understand the habitability of Earth, and how these findings guide the search for exoplanets that could support life. The author highlights how, within two decades of the discovery of the first planets outside the Solar System in the 1990s, scientists concluded that planets are so common that most stars are orbited by them.

The lives of exoplanets and their stars are inextricably interwoven. Stars are the seeds around which planets form, and they provide light and warmth for as long as they shine. At the end of their lives, stars expel massive amounts of newly forged elements into deep space, and that ejected material is incorporated into subsequent generations of planets.

How do we learn about these distant worlds? What does the exploration of other planets tell us about Earth? Can we find out what the distant future may have in store for us? What do we know about exoworlds and starbirth, and where do migrating hot Jupiters, polluted white dwarfs, and free-roaming nomad planets fit in? And what does all that have to do with the habitability of Earth, the possibility of finding extraterrestrial life, and the operation of the globe-spanning network of the sciences?

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