Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience [Audiobook]

Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience [Audiobook]
Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience [Audiobook] by Michael S Gazzaniga, read by Johnny Heller
2015 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 12 hrs 1 min | 340.72MB

Michael S. Gazzaniga, "the father of cognitive neuroscience", gives us an exciting behind-the-scenes look at his seminal work on the enigmatic coupling of the right and left brain.

In the mid-20th century, Michael S. Gazzaniga made one of the great discoveries in the history of neuroscience: split-brain theory, the notion that the right and left hemispheres of the brain can act independently from each other and have different strengths.

In Tales from Both Sides of the Brain, Gazzaniga tells the story of his passionate, entrepreneurial life in science and his decades-long journey to understand how the separate spheres of our brains communicate and miscommunicate their separate agendas. From his time as an ambitious undergraduate at Dartmouth, as a member of its now famed "Animal House" fraternity, and his life as a diligent graduate student in California to the first experiments he conducted in his own lab; from meeting his first split-brain patients to his collaboration with esteemed intellectuals across disciplines, Gazzaniga recounts the trajectory of his discoveries. In his engaging and accessible style, he paints a vivid portrait not only of his discovery of split-brain theory, but also of his comrades in arms - the many patients, friends, and family members who have accompanied him on this wild ride of intellectual discovery.

By turns humorous and moving, Tales from Both Sides of the Brain uses an extraordinary discovery about the nature of human consciousness to tell an enthralling story of how science gets done.

A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons [Audiobook]

A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons [Audiobook]
A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons [Audiobook] by Robert M Sapolsky, read by Mike Chamberlain
2013 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 14 hrs 35 mins | 415.33MB

"I had never planned to become a savanna baboon when I grew up; instead, I had always assumed I would become a mountain gorilla," writes Robert Sapolsky in this witty and riveting chronicle of a scientist's coming-of-age in remote Africa. An exhilarating account of Sapolsky's twenty-one-year study of a troop of rambunctious baboons in Kenya, A Primate's Memoir interweaves serious scientific observations with wry commentary about the challenges and pleasures of living in the wilds of the Serengeti-for man and beast alike.

Over two decades, Sapolsky survives culinary atrocities, gunpoint encounters, and a surreal kidnapping, while witnessing the encroachment of the tourist mentality on the farthest vestiges of unspoiled Africa. As he conducts unprecedented physiological research on wild primates, he becomes ever more enamored of his subjects - unique and compelling characters in their own right - and he returns to them summer after summer, until tragedy finally prevents him. By turns hilarious and poignant, A Primate's Memoir is a magnum opus from one of our foremost science writers.

What Is Life: How Chemistry Becomes Biology [Audiobook]

What Is Life: How Chemistry Becomes Biology [Audiobook]
What Is Life: How Chemistry Becomes Biology [Audiobook] by Addy Pross, read by Derek Perkins
2014 | MP3@64 kbps | 6 hrs 50 mins | 193.9MB

Seventy years ago, Erwin Schrodinger posed a simple, yet profound, question: What is life?. How could the very existence of such extraordinary chemical systems be understood? This problem has puzzled biologists and physical scientists both before, and ever since. Living things are hugely complex and have unique properties, such as self-maintenance and apparently purposeful behaviour which we do not see in inert matter. So how does chemistry give rise to biology? Did life begin with replicating molecules, and, if so, what could have led the first replicating molecules up such a path? Now, developments in the emerging field of 'systems chemistry' are unlocking the problem. Addy Pross shows how the different kind of stability that operates among replicating entities results in a tendency for certain chemical systems to become more complex and acquire the properties of life. Strikingly, he demonstrates that Darwinian evolution is the biological expression of a deeper and more fundamental chemical principle: the whole story from replicating molecules to complex life is one continuous coherent chemical process governed by a simple definable principle.

pages: 065 066 067 068 069 070 071 072 073 074 075
*100: 100