The Universe Speaks in Numbers: How Modern Maths Reveals Nature's Deepest Secrets [Audiobook]

The Universe Speaks in Numbers: How Modern Maths Reveals Nature's Deepest Secrets [Audiobook]
The Universe Speaks in Numbers: How Modern Maths Reveals Nature's Deepest Secrets [Audiobook] by Graham Farmelo, read by Hugh Kermode
2019 | M4B@64 kbps | 8h 37m | 235.01MB

One of the great mysteries of science is that its fundamental laws are written in the language of mathematics. Graham Farmelo's thrilling new book shows how modern maths has helped physicists to rethink gravity, space, and time.

The Universe Speaks in Numbers takes us on an adventure from the Enlightenment to the present with a vibrant cast of characters, illuminating the most exciting and controversial developments in contemporary thought. Always lively and authoritative, Farmelo navigates the listener through the huge imaginative leaps that are edging us towards a radically new conception of the nature of our universe.

The Science of Storytelling: Why Stories Make Us Human, and How to Tell Them Better [Audiobook]

The Science of Storytelling: Why Stories Make Us Human, and How to Tell Them Better [Audiobook]
The Science of Storytelling: Why Stories Make Us Human, and How to Tell Them Better [Audiobook] by Will Storr, read by the Author
2019 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 6h 27m | 176.12/0.38MB

Who would we be without stories?

Stories mould who we are, from our character to our cultural identity. They drive us to act out our dreams and ambitions and shape our politics and beliefs. We use them to construct our relationships, to keep order in our law courts, to interpret events in our newspapers and social media. Storytelling is an essential part of what makes us human.

There have been many attempts to understand what makes a good story - from Joseph Campbell's well-worn theories about myth and archetype to recent attempts to crack the 'Bestseller Code'. But few have used a scientific approach. This is curious, for if we are to truly understand storytelling in its grandest sense, we must first come to understand the ultimate storyteller - the human brain.

In this scalpel-sharp, thought-provoking audiobook, Will Storr demonstrates how master storytellers manipulate and compel us, leading us on a journey from the Hebrew scriptures to Mr Men, from Booker Prize-winning literature to box set TV. Applying dazzling psychological research and cutting-edge neuroscience to the foundations of our myths and archetypes, he shows how we can use these tools to tell better stories - and make sense of our chaotic modern world.

The Accidental Homo Sapiens: Genetics, Behavior, and Free Will [Audiobook]

The Accidental Homo Sapiens: Genetics, Behavior, and Free Will [Audiobook]
The Accidental Homo Sapiens: Genetics, Behavior, and Free Will [Audiobook] by Ian Tattersall, Rob DeSalle, read by Jonathan Todd Ross
2019 | M4B@64 kbps + EPUB | 7h 42m | 210.27/6.88MB

What happens now that human population has outpaced biological natural selection? Two leading scientists reveal how we became who we are - and what we might become.

When you think of evolution, the picture that most likely comes to mind is a straight-forward progression, the iconic illustration of a primate morphing into a proud, upright human being. But in reality, random events have played huge roles in determining the evolutionary histories of everything from lions to lobsters to humans. However, random genetic novelties are most likely to become fixed in small populations. It is mathematically unlikely that this will happen in large ones.

With our enormous, close-packed, and seemingly inexorably expanding population, humanity has fallen under the influence of the famous (or infamous) "bell curve." Ian Tattersall and Rob DeSalle's revelatory new book explores what the future of our species could hold, while simultaneously revealing what we didn't become - and what we won't become.

A cognitively unique species, and our actions fall on a bell curve as well. Individual people may be saintly or evil; generous or grasping; narrow-minded or visionary. But any attempt to characterize our species must embrace all of its members and so all of these antitheses. It is possible not just for the species, but for a single individual to be all of these things - even in the same day. We all fall somewhere within the giant hyperspace of the human condition that these curves describe.

The Accidental Homo Sapiens shows listeners that though humanity now exists on this bell curve, we are far from a stagnant species. Tattersall and DeSalle reveal how biological evolution in modern humans has given way to a cultural dynamic that is unlike anything else the Earth has ever witnessed, and that will keep life interesting - perhaps sometimes too interesting - for as long as we exist on this planet.

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