A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes [Audiobook]

A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes [Audiobook]
A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Stories in Our Genes [Audiobook] by Adam Rutherford, read by the Author
2016 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 11 hrs 26 mins | 311.45MB

This is a story about you. It is the history of who you are and how you came to be. It is unique to you, as it is for every one of the 100 billion modern humans who has ever drawn breath. But it is also our collective story, because in each of our genomes we carry the history of the whole of our species.

Since scientists first read the human genome in 2001, it has been subject to all sorts of claims, counterclaims and myths. Drawing together the latest discoveries in this rapidly changing area of science, Adam Rutherford shows that in fact our genomes should be read not like instruction manuals but more like epic poems. Genes determine less than we have been led to believe about us as individuals but vastly more about us as a species.

In this captivating journey through the expanding landscape of genetics, written with great clarity and wit, Adam Rutherford reveals what our genes now tell us about human history and what history tells us about our genes. From Neanderthal discoveries to microbiology, from redheads to dead royals, criminology to race relations, evolution to epigenetics, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived is a demystifying and illuminating new portrait of who we are and how we came to be.

Incurable Me: Why the Best Medical Research Does Not Make It into Clinical Practice [Audiobook]

Incurable Me: Why the Best Medical Research Does Not Make It into Clinical Practice [Audiobook]
Incurable Me: Why the Best Medical Research Does Not Make It into Clinical Practice [Audiobook] by K Paul Stoller MD, read by James Patrick Cronin
2016 | MP3@64 kbps | 8 hrs 24 mins | 231.65MB

In Incurable Me, a maverick physician brings transparency to some of medicine's most closely guarded secrets. As he establishes a link between commerce and medical research, K. P. Stoller also explains how to treat some of the most worrisome diseases and conditions afflicting humans today - including Lyme disease, brain trauma, dementia, and autism.

Dr. Stoller maintains that the best evidence in medical research is not incorporated into clinical practice unless the medical cartel has the potential to make large amounts of money promoting the results of the research. Stoller takes his provocative argument a step further, maintaining that if specific research conflicts with a powerful entity's financial interests, the likely result will be an effort to suppress or distort the results. Stoller cites numerous examples, including corporate influence on GMO labeling and public health.

Stoller also explores how "revolving-door-employment" between the Centers for Disease Control and large pharmaceutical companies can affect research results - as well as our health. Written in an accessible style that is thoroughly appropriate for a lay audience, Incurable Me is a must-listen for anyone interested in the state of modern medicine.

Know This: Today's Most Interesting and Important Scientific Ideas, Discoveries, and Developments [Audiobook]

Know This: Today's Most Interesting and Important Scientific Ideas, Discoveries, and Developments [Audiobook]
Know This: Today's Most Interesting and Important Scientific Ideas, Discoveries, and Developments [Audiobook] edited by John Brockman, read by Gabra Zackman, Dan John Miller
2017 | MP3@64 kbps | 14 hrs 40 mins | 404.27MB

The latest volume in the best-selling series from Edge.org - dubbed "the world's smartest website" by The Guardian - brings together 175 of the world's most innovative and brilliant thinkers to discuss recent scientific breakthroughs that will shape the future.

Scientific developments radically alter our understanding of the world. Whether it's technology, climate change, health research, or the latest revelations of neuroscience, physics, or psychology, science has, as Edge editor John Brockman says, "become a big story, if not the big story". In that spirit this new addition to Edge.org's fascinating series asks a powerful and provocative question: What do you consider the most interesting and important recent scientific news?

Contributors include the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond, on the best way to understand complex problems; the author of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics, Carlo Rovelli, on the mystery of black holes; Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker on the quantification of human progress; TED conferences curator Chris J. Anderson on the growth of the global brain; Harvard physicist Lisa Randall on the true measure of breakthrough discoveries; Nobel Prize-winning physicist Frank Wilczek on why the 21st century will be shaped by our mastery of the laws of matter; music legend Peter Gabriel on tearing down the barriers between imagination and reality; and Princeton physicist Freeman Dyson on the surprising ability of small (and cheap) upstarts to compete with billion-dollar projects. Plus Nobel laureate John C. Mather, Sun Microsystems cofounder Bill Joy, Skeptic magazine publisher Michael Shermer, Genome author Matt Ridley, Harvard geneticist George Church, and many more.

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