In the Dark: New Ways to Avoid the Harmful Effects of Living in a Technologically Connected World [Audiobook]

In the Dark: New Ways to Avoid the Harmful Effects of Living in a Technologically Connected World [Audiobook]
In the Dark: New Ways to Avoid the Harmful Effects of Living in a Technologically Connected World [Audiobook] by Jason Bawden-Smith, read by David Linski
2017 | MP3@64 kbps + Companion PDF | 4 hrs 38 mins | 135.73MB

Do you spend the majority of your day in front of a laptop, in artificial light? Then drive home, chatting on your Bluetooth before heating up your dinner in the microwave? Then you "relax" with your iPad, glancing at your flat screen TV that's downloading the latest movie, before setting the alarm on your phone and sleeping with it next to your head, the smart meter buzzing away in the background?

Here's another question: How do you feel? Any headaches or ringing in the ears? Lack of energy? Putting on weight? Annoying little allergies? Ever wondered if there's a connection?

Author and environmental scientist Jason Bawden-Smith believes that, with regard to the harmful effects of living in a technologically connected world, we are currently living in the dark.

There's no doubt technology serves great function in this day and age, and will continue to do so. In the Dark simply brings stronger awareness to the adverse effects technology can have, and offers simple and practical measures that people can take, without feeling they have to compromise the lifestyle they want.

I, Mammal: The Story of What Makes Us Mammals [Audiobook]

I, Mammal: The Story of What Makes Us Mammals [Audiobook]
I, Mammal: The Story of What Makes Us Mammals [Audiobook] by Liam Drew, read by Neil Gardner
2017 | MP3@64 kbps | 11 hrs 26 mins | 314.9MB

Humans are mammals. Most of us appreciate that at some level. But what does it mean for us to have more in common with a horse and an elephant than we do with a parrot, snake or frog?

After a misdirected football left new father Liam Drew clutching a uniquely mammalian part of his anatomy, he decided to find out more. Considering himself as a mammal first and a human second, Liam delves into ancient biological history to understand what it means to be mammalian.

In his humorous and engaging style, Liam explores the different characteristics that distinguish mammals from other types of animals. He charts the evolution of milk, warm blood and burgeoning brains, and examines the emergence of sophisticated teeth, exquisite ears, and elaborate reproductive biology, plus a host of other mammalian innovations. Entwined are tales of zoological peculiarities and reflections on how being a mammal has shaped the author's life.

I, Mammal is a history of mammals and their ancestors and of how science came to grasp mammalian evolution. And in celebrating our mammalian-ness, Liam Drew binds us a little more tightly to the five and a half thousand other species of mammal on this planet and reveals the deep roots of many traits humans hold dear.

Mask of the Sun: The Science, History and Forgotten Lore of Eclipses [Audiobook]

Mask of the Sun: The Science, History and Forgotten Lore of Eclipses [Audiobook]
Mask of the Sun: The Science, History and Forgotten Lore of Eclipses [Audiobook] by John Dvorak, read by Corey M Snow
2017 | MP3@64 kbps | 9 hrs 10 mins | 253.42MB

Eclipses have stunned, frightened, emboldened, and mesmerized people for thousands of years. They were recorded on ancient turtle shells discovered in the Wastes of Yin in China, on clay tablets from Mesopotamia and on the Mayan "Dresden Codex". They are mentioned in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and at least eight times in the Bible. Columbus used them to trick people, while Renaissance painter Taddeo Gaddi was blinded by one. Sorcery was banished within the Catholic Church after astrologers used an eclipse to predict a pope's death.

In Mask of the Sun, acclaimed writer John Dvorak explains the importance of the number 177 and why the ancient Romans thought it was bad to have sexual intercourse during an eclipse (whereas other cultures thought it would be good luck). Even today, pregnant women in Mexico wear safety pins on their underwear during an eclipse. Eclipses are an amazing phenomena - unique to Earth - that have provided the key to much of what we now know and understand about the sun, our moon, gravity, and the workings of the universe.

Both entertaining and authoritative, Mask of the Sun reveals the humanism behind the science of both lunar and solar eclipses. With insightful detail and vividly accessible prose, Dvorak provides explanations as to how and why eclipses occur.

pages: 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010
*100: 100