The Unmapped Mind: A Memoir of Neurology, Incurable Disease and Learning How to Live [Audiobook]

The Unmapped Mind: A Memoir of Neurology, Incurable Disease and Learning How to Live [Audiobook]
The Unmapped Mind: A Memoir of Neurology, Incurable Disease and Learning How to Live [Audiobook] by Christian Donlan, read by Daniel Weyman
2018 | MP3@64 kbps | 9 hrs 12 mins | 254.11MB

"My daughter took her first steps on the day I was diagnosed - a juxtaposition so perfect, so trite, so filled with the tacky artifice of real life that I am generally too embarrassed to tell anybody about it."

Shortly after his daughter, Leontine, was born, Christian Donlan's world shifted an inch to the left. He started to miss light switches and door handles when reaching for them. He would injure himself in a hundred stupid ways every day. First playful and then maddening, these strange experiences were the early symptoms of multiple sclerosis, an incurable and degenerative neurological disease.

As his young daughter starts to investigate the world around her, he, too, finds himself exploring a new landscape - the shifting and bewildering territory of the brain. He is a tourist in his own body, a stranger in a place that plays bizarre tricks on him, from dizzying double vision to mystifying memory loss.

Determined to master his new environment, Christian takes us on a fascinating and illuminating journey: through the history of neurology, the joys and anxieties of parenthood and the ultimate realisation of what, after everything you take for granted has been stripped away from you, is truly important in life.

An Unmapped Mind is a profoundly personal, uplifting and enriching memoir that will change the way you see your body, your mind and the world around you.

The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery [Audiobook]

The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery [Audiobook]
The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery [Audiobook] by Barbara K Lipska,‎ Elaine McArdle, read by Emma Powell
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 6 hrs 54 mins | 190.05MB

In January 2015, Barbara Lipska - a leading expert on the neuroscience of mental illness - was diagnosed with melanoma that had spread to her brain. Within months, her frontal lobe, the seat of cognition, began shutting down. She descended into madness, exhibiting dementia- and schizophrenia-like symptoms that terrified her family and coworkers. But miraculously, just as her doctors figured out what was happening, the immunotherapy they had prescribed began to work. Just eight weeks after her nightmare began, Lipska returned to normal. With one difference: she remembered her brush with madness with exquisite clarity.

In The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind, Lipska describes her extraordinary ordeal and its lessons about the mind and brain. She explains how mental illness, brain injury, and age can change our behavior, personality, cognition, and memory. She tells what it is like to experience these changes firsthand. And she reveals what parts of us remain, even when so much else is gone.

Picasso and the Painting That Shocked the World [Audiobook]

Picasso and the Painting That Shocked the World [Audiobook]
Picasso and the Painting That Shocked the World [Audiobook] by Miles J Unger, read by Malcolm Hillgartner
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 15 hrs 28 mins | 425.32MB

When Picasso became Picasso: the story of how an obscure young painter from Barcelona came to Paris and made himself into the most influential artist of the 20th century

In 1900, an 18-year-old Spaniard named Pablo Picasso made his first trip to Paris. It was in this glittering capital of the international art world that, after suffering years of poverty and neglect, he emerged as the leader of a bohemian band of painters, sculptors, and poets. Fueled by opium and alcohol, inspired by raucous late-night conversations at the Lapin Agile cabaret, Picasso and his friends resolved to shake up the world.

For most of these years Picasso lived and worked in a squalid tenement known as the Bateau Lavoir, in the heart of picturesque Montmartre. Here he met his first true love, Fernande Olivier, a muse whom he would transform in his art from Symbolist goddess to Cubist monster. These were years of struggle, often of desperation, but Picasso later looked back on them as the happiest of his long life.

Recognition came slowly: first in the avant-garde circles in which he traveled, and later among a small group of daring collectors, including the Americans Leo and Gertrude Stein. In 1906, Picasso began the vast, disturbing masterpiece known as Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. Inspired by the groundbreaking painting of Paul Cezanne and the startling inventiveness of African and tribal sculpture, Picasso created a work that captured and defined the disorienting experience of modernity itself. The painting proved so shocking that even his friends assumed he'd gone mad. Only his colleague George Braque understood what Picasso was trying to do. Over the next few years they teamed up to create Cubism, the most revolutionary and influential movement in 20th-century art.

This is the story of an artistic genius with a singular creative gift. It is filled with heartbreak and triumph, despair and delirium, all of it played out against the backdrop of the world's most captivating city.

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