Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War [Audiobook]

Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War [Audiobook]
Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War [Audiobook] by Marwan Hisham, Molly Crabapple, read by Peter Ganim
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 8 hours and 28 minutes | 233.07MB

A bracingly immediate memoir by a young man coming of age during the Syrian war, Brothers of the Gun is an intimate lens on the century's bloodiest conflict and a profound meditation on kinship, home, and freedom.

In 2011, Marwan Hisham and his two friends - fellow working-class college students Nael and Tareq - joined the first protests of the Arab Spring in Syria, in response to a recent massacre. Arm in arm they marched, poured Coca-Cola into one another's eyes to blunt the effects of tear gas, ran from the security forces, and cursed the country's president, Bashar al-Assad. It was ecstasy. A long-bottled revolution was finally erupting, and freedom from a brutal dictator seemed, at last, imminent. Five years later, the three young friends were scattered: one now an Islamist revolutionary, another dead at the hands of government soldiers, and the last, Marwan, now a journalist in Turkish exile, trying to find a way back to a homeland reduced to rubble.

Brothers of the Gun is the story of a young man coming of age during the Syrian war, from its inception to the present. Marwan watched from the rooftops as regime warplanes bombed soldiers; as revolutionary activist groups, for a few dreamy days, spray-painted hope on Raqqa; as his friends died or threw in their lot with Islamist fighters. He became a journalist by courageously tweeting out news from a city under siege by ISIS, the Russians, and the Americans all at once. He watched the country that ran through his veins - the country that held his hopes, dreams, and fears - be destroyed in front of him and eventually joined the relentless stream of refugees risking their lives to escape.

Brothers of the Gun offers a ground-level reflection on the Syrian revolution - and how it bled into international catastrophe and global war. This is a story of pragmatism and idealism, impossible violence and repression, and, even in the midst of war, profound acts of courage, creativity, and hope.

American Values: Lessons I Learned from My Family [Audiobook]

American Values: Lessons I Learned from My Family [Audiobook]
American Values: Lessons I Learned from My Family [Audiobook] by Robert F Kennedy Jr, read by Stephen Graybill
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 15 hours and 43 minutes | 432.46MB

With rich detail, compelling honesty, and a storyteller's gift, RFK Jr. describes growing up Kennedy in a tumultuous time in history that eerily echoes the issues of nuclear confrontation, religion, race, and inequality that we confront today.

This powerful book combines the best aspects of memoir and political history. The third child of Attorney General Robert Kennedy and nephew of JFK takes us on a journey through his life, including watershed moments in the history of our nation.

These words come vividly to life with intimate stories of RFK Jr.'s own experiences, not just with historical events and the movers who shaped them, but also with his mother and father, his own struggles with addiction, and the ways he eventually made peace with both his Kennedy legacy and his own demons. The result is a book that is remarkably stirring and relevant, providing both insight and hope for all Americans at a time when they are needed like never before.

Tip of the Iceberg: My 3,000-Mile Journey Around Wild Alaska, the Last Great American Frontier [Audiobook]

Tip of the Iceberg: My 3,000-Mile Journey Around Wild Alaska, the Last Great American Frontier [Audiobook]
Tip of the Iceberg: My 3,000-Mile Journey Around Wild Alaska, the Last Great American Frontier [Audiobook] by Mark Adams, read by the Author
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9 hours and 11 minutes | 252.96MB

From the acclaimed, best-selling author of Turn Right at Machu Picchu, a fascinating and funny journey into Alaska, America's last frontier, retracing the historic 1899 Harriman Expedition.

In 1899, railroad magnate Edward H. Harriman organized a most unusual summer voyage to the wilds of Alaska: He converted a steamship into a luxury "floating university", populated by some of America's best and brightest scientists and writers, including the anti-capitalist eco-prophet, John Muir. Those aboard encountered a land of immeasurable beauty and impending environmental calamity. More than 100 years later, Alaska is still America's most sublime wilderness, both the lure that draws a million tourists annually on Inside Passage cruises and a natural resources larder waiting to be raided. As ever, it remains a magnet for weirdos and dreamers.

Armed with Dramamine and an industrial-strength mosquito net, Mark Adams sets out to retrace the 1899 expedition. Using the state's intricate public ferry system, the Alaska Marine Highway System, Adams travels 3,000 miles, following the George W. Elder's itinerary north through Wrangell, Juneau, and Glacier Bay, then continuing west into the colder and stranger regions of the Aleutians and the Arctic Circle. Along the way, he encounters dozens of unusual characters (and a couple of very hungry bears) and investigates how lessons learned in 1899 might relate to Alaska's current struggles in adapting to climate change.

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