Moneyland: The Inside Story of the Crooks and Kleptocrats Who Rule the World [Audiobook]

Moneyland: The Inside Story of the Crooks and Kleptocrats Who Rule the World [Audiobook]
Moneyland: The Inside Story of the Crooks and Kleptocrats Who Rule the World [Audiobook] by Oliver Bullough, read by the Author
2019 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 9h 48m | 269.23/2.14MB

"If you want to know why international crooks and their eminently respectable financial advisors walk tall and only the little people pay taxes, this is the ideal book for you. Every politician and moneyman on the planet should read it, but they won't because it's actually about them." (John le Carré, author of A Legacy of Spies)

An investigative journalist's deep dive into the corrupt workings of the world's kleptocrats.

From ruined towns on the edge of Siberia to Bond-villain lairs in London and Manhattan, something has gone wrong. Kleptocracies, governments run by corrupt leaders who prosper at the expense of their people, are on the rise.

Once upon a time, if an official stole money, there wasn't much he could do with it. He could buy himself a new car or build himself a nice house or give it to his friends and family, but that was about it. If he kept stealing, the money would just pile up in his house until he had no rooms left to put it in, or it was eaten by mice.

And then some bankers had a bright idea.

Join the investigative journalist Oliver Bullough on a journey into Moneyland - the secret country of the lawless, stateless super-rich.

Learn how the institutions of Europe and the US have become money-laundering operations, attacking the foundations of many of the world's most stable countries. Meet the kleptocrats. Meet their awful children. And find out how heroic activists around the world are fighting back.

This is the story of wealth and power in the 21st century. It isn't too late to change it.

The Robots Are Coming!: The Future of Jobs in the Age of Automation [Audiobook]

The Robots Are Coming!: The Future of Jobs in the Age of Automation [Audiobook]
The Robots Are Coming: The Future of Jobs in the Age of Automation [Audiobook] by Andres Oppenheimer, read by Henry Levya
2019 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 12h 45m | 350.69/1.18MB

Staying true to his trademark journalistic approach, Andrés Oppenheimer takes his listeners on yet another journey, this time across the globe, in a thought-provoking search to understand what the future holds for today's jobs in the foreseeable age of automation.

The Robots Are Coming! centers around the issue of jobs and their future in the context of rapid automation and the growth of online products and services. As two of Oppenheimer's interviewees - both experts in technology and economics from Oxford University - indicate, 47 percent of existing jobs are at risk of becoming automated or rendered obsolete by other technological changes in the next 20 years. Oppenheimer examines current changes in several fields, including the food business, legal work, banking, and medicine, speaking with experts in the field and citing articles and literature on automation in various areas of the workforce. He contrasts the perspectives of "techno-optimists" with those of "techno-negativists" and generally attempts to find a middle ground between an alarmist vision of the future and one that is too uncritical. A self-described "cautious optimist", Oppenheimer believes that technology will not create massive unemployment but rather will drastically change what work looks like.

The Dinosaur Artist: Obsession, Betrayal, and the Quest for Earth's Ultimate Trophy [Audiobook]

The Dinosaur Artist: Obsession, Betrayal, and the Quest for Earth's Ultimate Trophy [Audiobook]
The Dinosaur Artist: Obsession, Betrayal, and the Quest for Earth's Ultimate Trophy [Audiobook] by Paige Williams, read by Ellen Archer
2018 | MP3@64 kbps + EPUB | 12 hours and 26 minutes | 341.65MB

New Yorker magazine staff writer Paige Williams explores the riveting and perilous world of fossil collectors in this "tremendous" (David Grann) true tale of one Florida man's attempt to sell a dinosaur skeleton from Mongolia - "a triumphant book" (Publishers Weekly) that is "steeped in natural history, human nature, commerce, crime, science, and politics" (Rebecca Skloot).

In 2012, a New York auction catalog boasted an unusual offering: "[A] superb Tyrannosaurus skeleton." In fact, Lot 49135 consisted of a nearly complete T. bataar, a close cousin to the most famous animal that ever lived. The fossils now on display in a Manhattan event space had been unearthed in Mongolia, more than 6,000 miles away. At eight feet high and 24 feet long, the specimen was spectacular, and when the gavel sounded, the winning bid was over one million dollars.

Eric Prokopi, a 38-year-old Floridian, was the man who had brought this extraordinary skeleton to market. A onetime swimmer who spent his teenage years diving for shark teeth, Prokopi's singular obsession with fossils fueled a thriving business hunting, preparing, and selling specimens to clients ranging from natural history museums to avid private collectors like actor Leonardo DiCaprio.

But there was a problem. This time, facing financial strain, had Prokopi gone too far? As the T. bataar went to auction, a network of paleontologists alerted the government of Mongolia to the eye-catching lot. As an international custody battle ensued, Prokopi watched as his own world unraveled.

In the tradition of The Orchid Thief, The Dinosaur Artist is a stunning work of narrative journalism about humans' relationship with natural history and a seemingly intractable conflict between science and commerce. A story that stretches from Florida's Land O' Lakes to the Gobi Desert, The Dinosaur Artist illuminates the history of fossil collecting - a murky, sometimes risky business populated by eccentrics and obsessives, where the lines between poacher and hunter, collector and smuggler, enthusiast and opportunist, can easily blur.

In her first audiobook, Paige Williams has given listeners an irresistible story that spans continents, cultures, and millennia as she examines the question of who, ultimately, owns the past.

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