How to Draw [TTC Video]

How to Draw [TTC Video]
How to Draw [TTC Video] by David Brody
Course No 7770 | MKV, AVC, 755 kbps, 1024x576 | AAC, 96 kbps, 2 Ch | 36x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 5.31GB

Like reading and writing, drawing is a fundamental life skill. Once an integral part of a traditional education, knowledge of drawing deepens your understanding of the visual world that surrounds you and enhances your ability to interact meaningfully with it. In addition to the many pleasures of drawing, the ability to see as an artist sees brings a new dimension to self-expression and elevates your skill in countless other activities, from photography and design to the deeper appreciation of nature and art.

Professional artists in the West have traditionally studied drawing first, as a primary and foundational skill. And, as you’ll discover in How to Draw, the art of drawing is eminently learnable.

Contrary to what many people think, the ability to draw both accurately and expressively does not depend on innate talent or a unique gift. Think of it like this: Anyone can learn to play a musical instrument, though not everyone can be Mozart. Similarly, though not everyone can be Michelangelo or van Gogh, anyone can learn the skills of drawing and develop the ability to draw what they see from observation and invent whole worlds from their imagination.

In fact, you may be amazed at how well you can learn to draw, even if you believe you have no artistic talent. As this course demonstrates through clear examples, you can learn to apply the same fundamental principles that professional artists routinely use in their drawings. If you follow the professor’s guidance, by the end of the course you’ll understand how to faithfully represent what you see in front of you and in your mind’s eye.

The 36 video lessons of How to Draw offer you dynamic and comprehensive training in the art of drawing. Your teacher, David Brody, Professor of Painting and Drawing at of the University of Washington, brings more than forty years of study, studio work, and dedicated teaching to this course, demonstrating an inspiring teaching style and limitless insight into the learning process.

This brilliantly designed course takes you step by step through all of the key elements that, taken together, form the art of drawing. Through Professor Brody’s presentation and your own studio practice, you’ll study the core principles of drawing, such as line, proportion, composition, value, light and shadow, texture, color, and figure drawing. You’ll also study many of the groundbreaking Renaissance methods used for realistically depicting illusionistic space on a two dimensional surface, including empirical and linear perspective.

In the later lectures, you’ll explore the ways in which Renaissance spatial constructs evolved to include a broader understanding of pictorial space. You will study the essential connection between figuration and abstraction, and the ways in which this opened new possibilities for art that melded abstraction and representation.

Throughout the course, you’ll take lessons and inspiration from dozens of master drawings from history’s greatest draftsmen— artists like Albrecht Dürer, Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Van Gogh, Thomas Eakins, and contemporary masters such as Richard Diebenkorn and Norman Lundin. The result is a richly enjoyable and effective system for learning this remarkable art.

You can use the course material in many ways. How to Draw is a rich and deep resource, offering a wide spectrum of lessons that make the skills of drawing directly accessible.

Learn the Language of Drawing

Start by tracing the fascinating history of drawing, and begin to experiment with the artist’s materials you’ll use throughout the course. From there, you’ll study the underlying “grammar” of drawing, and make drawings that explore elements such as:

  • Line: Learn to use contour and construction line to draw objects and cross-contour line to create volume.
  • Shape: Draw individual objects by constructing them from basic geometric shapes, and discover the elements of positive, negative, and aggregate shape.
  • Composition: Study how to organize the parts of a drawing to create a unified whole within a specific rectangle, using techniques of compositional balance, spatial organization, and the use of focal areas and focal points.
  • Proportion: Use the velo of Alberti, a gridded Renaissance device that allows you to understand how three-dimensional form can be accurately depicted on a flat surface, and learn to control proportion by using a standard unit of measure, level and plumb lines, and quantify difficult angles using the clock hand approach.
  • Illusionistic Space: Study in detail how to create flatness, volume, and space, using such tools as receding diagonals and foreshortened shapes, the relative scale of objects, and atmospheric perspective.

With each new step in the process, you’ll apply your knowledge in drawing projects, which encompass individual objects, still lifes, interiors, and self-portraits.

Master the Principles of Linear Perspective

The Renaissance discovery of linear perspective radically changed the way future generations would draw, allowing artists to depict three-dimensional space with astonishing accuracy. In the course, you’ll devote five lectures and numerous drawing projects to a study of this powerful drawing tool.

  • Investigate one-point perspective, and how diagonal lines recede to a “vanishing point” on the horizon, a principle that allows you to create three-dimensional form in space.
  • Learn to draw perspectival grids—used for measuring depth of space in a drawing—and geometric patterns in perspective.
  • Continue with the principles governing inclined planes, the principles of two-point perspective (which depicts planes angled differently from in one-point perspective), and the principles of three-point perspective (which describes what we see when we look up or down).
  • Combine your knowledge of illusionistic space and perspective to draw architectural landscapes, buildings, and room interiors.

Explore the Uses of Value, Texture, and Color

Discover further elements that add depth and dimension to your art. As you go through the course, you’ll build your vocabulary of drawing terms and learn to apply a wide array of new techniques.

  • Investigate the rich possibilities of visual texturein drawing. Practice textural techniques such as hatching, create your own textural marks, and learn to simulate the textures of objects.
  • Study color theory, the spectrum of colors on the color wheel, and how colors function in nature.
  • Choose palettes of colors for your drawings, and learn to use color to create mood, emotion, visual hierarchy, space, and light.
  • Learn how to use value (the relative lightness or darkness of tones) in creating mood, volume, and as a compositional tool in directing the viewer’s attention.
  • Develop the ability to portray light,both natural and artificial, and shadow; learn to draw cast shadows, both outdoors and within interiors.

You’ll also get in-depth instruction on how to draw realistic human figures.

  • Study a canon of human proportions, and draw the figure by building it using measure and component geometric shapes.
  • Delve into the underlying structure of the body, learning about human anatomy like Leonardo and Michelangelo: study the skeleton and muscles, their functions, and how to create naturalistic volume in figure drawing.
  • Do a range of figure-drawing projects, including self-portraits, figures in perspective, and figures in narrative contexts.

Professor Brody’s presentation shows you that in order to portray the visual world naturalistically, you must learn to see analytically and abstractly, as artists see. Among many things, this means learning to understand the underlying architecture of form and developing the ability to visualize the whole before the details.

Forge A Vision for Your Own Work

In the course’s final section, Professor Brody guides you in applying what you’ve learned to discover your own personal creative vision. Here, you’ll encounter concepts and do advanced drawing projects aimed at developing individual source material and subject matter for your own drawings, and you’ll form a clearer idea of the kind of art you want to make.

Throughout the course, Professor Brody illustrates the subject matter with vivid animations, live demonstrations of key principles, and drawings by both celebrated masters and students whose work exemplifies and clarifies the learning process. In addition to the video lectures themselves, Professor Brody has crafted many exercises for you to practice your newly acquired skills.

These 36 in-depth lessons help you build a complete and integrated set of drawing skills in a step-by-step, clear, and detailed manner. How to Draw is your opportunity to understand and master the skills, concepts, and art of drawing, an ability with rewards you will treasure for a lifetime.

How to Draw [TTC Video]

How to Read and Understand Shakespeare [TTC Video]

How to Read and Understand Shakespeare [TTC Video]
How to Read and Understand Shakespeare by Marc C Conner
Course No 2711 | MKV, AVC, 1069 kbps, 960x720 | AAC, 96 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 6.16GB

Shakespeare—perhaps the greatest literary artist in history—presents a fundamental paradox to his audience. No other Western writer is so celebrated and revered. His plays are seen, read, and studied throughout the world as models of high culture and timeless art. His best-known characters have become mythic symbols in our culture. His poetry and turns of phrase permeate our spoken language. Shakespeare enjoys near-universal agreement among scholars as well as the general public that his works are among the greatest of humanity’s cultural expressions, and that we all should know and understand them.

But appreciating this greatest of writers does not come easily. Simply put, Shakespeare is difficult. His language and culture—those of Elizabethan England, 400 years ago—are greatly different from our own, and his poetry, thick with metaphorical imagery and double meanings, can be hard to penetrate. His theater and the tools of stagecraft available to him can seem quite distant to us. The motives of his characters and the meanings of his philosophical reflections on politics, religion, society, and human relationships are often complex and challenging to reckon with.

Yet, perhaps surprisingly, the keys to understanding Shakespeare are written into the plays themselves. If you can learn to recognize Shakespeare’s own directions to you as a reader and theatergoer—the clues that allow you to engage meaningfully with the playwright’s language, to follow the plot structures and themes that drive his plays, and to track the development of his characters—the plays reveal themselves and become yours for a lifetime of pleasure and meaning.

How, then, do you find these keys to Shakespeare? What are the clues that allow you to truly “get” his great plays—to intimately appreciate their sublime poetry, deeper meanings, and human greatness?

How to Read and Understand Shakespeare, taught by award-winning Professor Marc C. Conner of Washington and Lee University, offers compelling answers to these questions and more, guiding you in an innovative and penetrating exploration of Shakespeare’s plays. He shows you in clear, practical terms how to enter Shakespeare’s dramatic world, to grasp what’s happening in any of his plays, and to enjoy them fully both on the page and the stage.

Interpreting Dramatic Genius

Under Professor Conner’s expert guidance, shaped by decades of studying and performing Shakespeare, you learn a set of interpretive tools, drawn from the texts themselves, that give you direct, immediate insight into Shakespeare’s plays. These guiding principles allow you to follow the narratives of the plays as they unfold, with a clear understanding of how the plays function and fit together. Among them, you learn that Shakespeare’s comedies follow a three-part structure, beginning with a block to love, followed by an escape and a testing of the characters, and ending with a return and reconciliation.

You learn corresponding principles and tools for appreciating his tragedies, histories, and late romances, in an inquiry covering two-thirds of Shakespeare’s dramatic work, including a detailed study of 12 of his greatest plays.

The rewards of the course are both immediate and lifelong—empowering you to grasp the richness and subtlety of Shakespeare’s glorious language, the astounding power of his storytelling, the unforgettable characters that populate the plays, and his visionary insight into the human heart and spirit. These 24 revealing lectures provide the tools that allow you to understand and mine the riches of any Shakespeare play.

Discover the Keys to Shakespeare’s World

Across the span of the lectures, you learn more than 40 interpretive tools that illuminate different aspects of the plays, including these:

  • The Words, Words, Words tool: The most fundamental tool for appreciating Shakespeare. Study the text of Romeo and Juliet, as well as major speeches from many other plays, to uncover and appreciate Shakespeare’s “registers” of language, his use of poetic forms, and his richly metaphorical and symbolic use of English.
  • The Double-Plot tool: In examples ranging from A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Henry IV, Part 1 to The Tempest, see how Shakespeare—in virtually every play—uses the theatrical device of a high (upper-class) plot, contrasted with a low (lower-class) storyline that mirrors or comments on the high plot.
  • The Appearance versus Reality tool: A vital principle for all of Shakespeare’s plays. Highlighting figures including Viola in Twelfth Night, Angelo in Measure for Measure,and Macbeth, Professor Conner shows how Shakespeare’s character-driven narratives hinge on the need to distinguish external appearance from internal reality.
  • The Drama of Ideas tool: Throughout the course, witness how Shakespeare’s plays are filled with serious contemplation of the great questions of philosophy, religion, and politics, as seen in the core theological issues at work in Hamlet, or the ways in which Richard II questions the nature of kingship.
  • The Decisive Third Act tool: As a highly useful structural key, learn to pay close attention to the decisive third act of a Shakespeare play, and see, in The Merchant of Venice, Romeo and Juliet, and others, how the third act functions as a pivot point on which the action shifts decisively and the play’s direction is determined.
  • The Arc of Character tool: Observe how Shakespeare’s main characters, from Portia and Hamlet to Falstaff and Lady Macbeth, follow a line of development over the course of a play, such as a movement from ignorance to knowledge, a psychological rise or fall, or an altering of the character’s external role within the story.

Engage with Shakespeare’s Deepest Meanings

As a core strength of Professor Conner’s approach, the interpretive tools bring you into direct contact with the ultimate ends that the plays serve. Critically, you find that one of Shakespeare’s most seminal, underlying themes is that of self-transformation—that while his great comic characters reveal the capacity to reformulate their identities and to balance extreme desires, his tragic plays concern the failure to achieve balance and wisdom.

Through an in-depth study of Measure for Measure, you contemplate Shakespeare’s “problem plays”—those that seem to be neither comedies nor true tragedies—and the significance of these unusual works in his dramatic cycle. Finally, with The Tempest you discover the world of the playwright’s “late romances,” which poignantly reveal his thematic concern with forgiveness, reconciliation, and regeneration.

Drawing on nearly 20 years of teaching Shakespeare, including both literature and drama courses, as well as extensive experience in directing and acting Shakespeare, Professor Conner also reveals fascinating details of the playwright’s era, which shed further light on the plays and on the way his audiences perceived them—aided by archival illustrations, paintings, and maps of Elizabethan London. You learn about the colorful, raucous world of the theater in Shakespeare’s time, how his contemporaries conceived of history, and about the surprising Elizabethan customs of courtship and marriage that help explain Shakespeare’s comic plots.

Enjoy These Great Plays for a Lifetime

For over 400 years, Shakespeare’s plays have enthralled, moved, and enriched each new generation of readers and theatergoers. How to Read and Understand Shakespeare builds the skills that allow you to reach your own understanding of the plays—to deeply comprehend Shakespeare’s transcendent poetic language, the spellbinding world of his great characters and stories, and his revelatory reflections on human experience. The tools you learn are yours for years of enjoyment of these monumental treasures of our culture.

Analysis and Critique: How to Engage and Write about Anything [TTC Video]

Analysis and Critique: How to Engage and Write about Anything [TTC Video]
Analysis and Critique: How to Engage and Write about Anything by Dorsey Armstrong [TTC Video]
Course No 2133 | AVI, XviD, 986 kbps, 640x480 | MP3, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 5.06GB

For thousands of years, writing has been a powerful way for us to communicate with one another, to share our distinct thoughts and ideas through the power of words. Even in today's technologically saturated 21st century, we still express ourselves in writing almost every single day. And oftentimes, we write to argue our viewpoints, persuade others that we're right, and share our unique experiences and perspectives.

But all writing—whether it's a powerful essay, a persuasive letter, a detailed business report, or an autobiographical story—is at its most effective and memorable when it's built on the fundamental critical and analytical skills that transform your words from "good" writing to "great" writing. Regardless of your subject, your goal, or your occasion, these skills are the heart and soul of engaging and effective writing. They include the ability to

  • organize your thoughts into a coherent piece that never leaves your reader behind;
  • make a persuasive argument rooted in solid facts;
  • draw on the styles and characteristics of various literary genres;
  • make responsible use of research materials and outside resources; and
  • avoid common grammatical errors that could cost you your credibility.

You'll find the secrets to these and other concepts and methods for clear and strong writing in the 24 accessible and practical lectures of Analysis and Critique: How to Engage and Write about Anything. Delivered by Professor Dorsey Armstrong of Purdue University—whose work with students involves the art and craft of analytical and persuasive writing—this course immerses you in the elements of successful writing. With its engaging literary and everyday examples, inspirational prompts, and unforgettable insights, Analysis and Critique makes the perfect reference guide for both professional and casual writers.

Five Literary Genres, Endless Insights

One of the essential keys of effective writing: understanding literary genres and the ways their unique styles and characteristics can shape and inform your own voice. Professor Armstrong spends the first lectures of her course guiding you through the five major literary genres and the ways some of their most enduring examples can show you the path to stronger persuasive and critical writing.

  • Fiction: By learning how to actively read a range of short stories and novels by authors including Jane Austen, Ernest Hemingway, Edgar Allan Poe, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, you'll strengthen your ability to understand how a writer creates his or her "voice," and how a writer conveys particular information to his or her audience.
  • Essay: Of all the literary genres, the essay is the richest resource for studying the characteristics of a powerfully written argument. You'll discover how essays such as Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" and Henry David Thoreau's "Walden" demonstrate effective strategies for starting, organizing, supporting, and concluding your arguments.
  • Poetry: Somewhat surprisingly, poetry has much to offer nonpoetic writers looking to strengthen their craft—especially its command and flexibility. In examining the work of poets such as William Carlos Williams, John Donne, and e. e. cummings, you'll learn how to tap into the power of figurative language, careful word choices, and dramatic word ordering.
  • Drama: Speeches, conference papers, and other writing intended for oral presentation offer their own set of challenges to everyday writers. By using selected excerpts by William Shakespeare, history's greatest playwright, Professor Armstrong gives you invaluable tips for mastering the art of tone, timing, and delivery of writing meant to be spoken out loud.
  • Autobiography: Writing that draws on your life to achieve a goal or enhance your credibility isn't as daunting as it may seem. Detailed looks at excerpts from autobiographies by Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, and others offer helpful hints about how much personal information to include, how to take the most effective approach, and more.

Frequently, the lectures are enhanced with writing prompts and practice examples—such as rewriting a passage in five different styles or writing an idea from different narrative perspectives—designed to help you better understand how to use and apply the insights found in these five genres.

Explore the Fundamentals of Rhetoric

From there, Analysis and Critique turns to a series of lectures that focus on the art of rhetoric (the foundation of argumentation) and the ways it can help you adapt your writing to a variety of different situations. And make the most of them.

Rhetorical ideas are so deeply woven into the fabric of Western culture that it's easy to miss out on opportunities to maximize their benefits in your writing. Knowing this, Professor Armstrong not only explains them thoroughly but also shows you how to use them regularly and systematically to make your writing stronger and more persuasive. Some of the most applicable rhetorical concepts you explore in this part of the course include

  • deductive reasoning, a form of reasoning that moves from the knowledge you already have to the knowledge that has yet to be discovered and articulated;
  • commonplaces, which are well-known words and phrases that can easily communicate your theme or topic to your audience; and
  • pathos, which works to inspire emotion in your readers (particularly feelings of sympathy).

The increased awareness of classical rhetoric you gain from these particular lectures will go a long way to helping you become a stronger writer by calling your attention to the basics of compelling analytical writing. You may never use terms like "commonplaces" and "pathos" in your actual writing—but understanding how they work will enhance the importance of what you write and the way you write it.

Get a Step-by-Step Guide to the Writing Process

What about the act of writing itself, which can often be daunting to the most seasoned writer? You can be drafting a work presentation, a cover letter for a job application, an editorial for your local newspaper, or a persuasive letter for a public official—in any case, knowing how to approach the act itself can reap many rewards.

The final section of Analysis and Critique is a fascinating, step-by-step guide through the writing process. With her keen eye for providing helpful strategies and using real-world examples, Professor Armstrong provides answers to frequently asked questions about each of writing's four major stages:

  • Researching: How do you determine what your research goals are? Where should you look for reliable sources of information? How do you narrow your research focus?
  • Writing a First Draft: How long does a productive brainstorming session last? Why is it OK to write a deliberately bad first draft? What are good ways to conquer writer's block?
  • Editing: How long should you wait before you start editing your writing? How can you tell when you've used too many quotations? What grammatical errors should you watch out for?
  • Rewriting: What makes a rewrite different from an edit? What specifics should you pay attention to in rewriting? How do you recast supporting points to better fit your argument?

Writing Made Effective—and Fun

As a university professor with years of experience, the instructor of a general education writing course at Purdue University, and a distinguished editor, Professor Armstrong spends nearly every day in the company of writing—both good and bad. She knows which techniques work and which do not. She knows the common pitfalls, concerns, and fears that most writers have. And she knows just how important effective writing skills are in expressing yourself successfully to others.

But even more important than her experience working with writers and her knowledge of the craft is the way Professor Armstrong makes writing feel like a fun process of self-discovery. Her lectures are always engaging, always accessible, and always filled with information and takeaways that you can use any time you need to write.

So tap into the power of effective writing with Analysis and Critique, and learn what it's like to have a masterful and supportive instructor standing right by your side as you learn the ways to write about practically anything.

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