Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Techniques for Retraining Your Brain [TTC Video]

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Techniques for Retraining Your Brain [TTC Video]
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Techniques for Retraining Your Brain [TTC Video] by Jason M Satterfield
Course No 9631 | M4V, AVC, 640x360 | AAC, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 11.28GB

Why is it so hard to lose weight, stop smoking, or establish healthy habits? Why do couples argue about the same issues over and over? Why do so many people lie awake at night, stricken with worry and anxiety? Why is it so difficult to come to terms with a loved one’s death, even if it’s after a long illness?

The answers to these questions—and the path to lasting change in your life—lie in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a well-tested collection of practical techniques for managing moods and modifying undesirable behaviors through self-awareness, critical analysis, and taking steps toward gradual, goal-oriented change.

CBT illuminates the links between thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and physical health and uses those connections to develop concrete plans for self-improvement. Built on a solid foundation of neurological and behavioral research, CBT is not simply about treating mental illness. It is an approach almost anyone can use for promoting greater mental health and improving quality of life.

In the 24 engaging half-hour lectures of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Techniques for Retraining Your Brain, you’ll build a robust and effective self-improvement toolkit with the expert guidance of Professor Jason M. Satterfield of the University of California, San Francisco. You will explore CBT’s roots in Socratic and stoic philosophy, build a toolkit of CBT techniques, and review the latest research about its outcomes. Additionally, this intriguing and practical course allows you to take on the roles of medical student, physician, psychologist, and patient.

As a special feature of this course, you’ll observe CBT session scenarios between Professor Satterfield and three “patients”:

  • Maria, 70, is a caretaker for her terminally ill husband. She struggles with depression, anxiety, insomnia, and coming to terms with his death.
  • Carol, 30, is so anxious in everyday social situations that she has trouble developing friendships.
  • Michael, 50, has a temper that can flare up at a moment’s notice. He wishes he could keep his anger under control.

After completing this course, you will be armed with myriad resources to examine your own thoughts, emotions, and behaviors and to set yourself on the path to a better life, all without leaving the comfort of your own home.

The Science of Lasting Change

Everyone has something about their life that they would like to improve. Learning how to assess your situation and select an appropriate tool for change is a vital skill. Cognitive behavioral therapy engages a patient in a very scientific and logical approach to creating lasting change. It is:

  • Collaborative and transparent: The therapist and patient work together as equal partners throughout the treatment process.
  • Empirical: Each session includes homework, such as jotting down notes about behaviors, thoughts, and emotions in a journal. The next steps in the process are based on the evidence of the previous week’s “experiments.”
  • Time-limited: The CBT process is designed for 12-24 sessions. Once a patient understands the process, it becomes easier for them to be their own CBT therapist.
  • Skills-focused: CBT teaches the patient skills to practice in the real world, such as social experiments and somatic quieting techniques.
  • Symptom-focused: While CBT was developed to treat depression, it is also effective for anger, anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, and developing healthier habits.
  • Present-focused: Rather than the bottom-up approach of traditional psychotherapy, CBT works from the top down, starting with the patient’s daily life.

A core assumption behind CBT is that human beings, by nature, aren't particularly rational. In fact, we aren't even mostly rational. We take all sorts of shortcuts in terms of how we think, how we process, and how we make decisions. CBT helps you become aware of your daily thoughts, categorize them as “helpful” or “hurtful” (instead of true or false), and decide how to act on them.

Engineer Your Own Happiness

Throughout the course, you’ll explore issues that cause people to seek out therapy. In some cases, you’ll get to watch Dr. Satterfield working with a patient, and in others, you’ll be delving into the research to see what causes these issues and how CBT helps to resolve them.

  • Stress: Humans are unique in that we can stress ourselves out with hypothetical events, things that never happen or might never happen. An individual's appraisals may be out of sync with reality, or out of touch with their actual coping skills. CBT helps to uncover those thoughts and to begin restructuring them.
  • Depression: People who are feeling depressed often engage in maladaptive behaviors, which exacerbate their depressed feelings. For example, in one of the three depressive spirals, a depressed person may engage in less social activity, which makes them more depressed, thus causing them to pull away even more. CBT helps patients reverse the spiral and participate more fully in their lives.
  • Anger: Have you ever had a fight with someone that took place wholly in your mind? The journaling aspect of CBT brings awareness to these hostile fantasies, and the somatic quieting techniques you learn can help you avoid letting your emotions get away from you.

CBT can help you address a variety of common concerns. Some of these issues fall under the traditional rubric of mental health, such as anxiety, depression, and trauma. Others are stressors in that occur in everyone’s life, from everyday challenges like conflicts at work to potentially life-changing events like the loss of a loved one. Even with medical issues, such as insomnia, weight management, and chronic pain, CBT can be a powerful part of better understanding the problem and enhancing the healing process. Unlike other forms of psychotherapy, CBT places the power in the hands of the patient, who learns and practices an explicit skillset that lasts long after therapy might end.

Self-Help for Critical Thinkers

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a thoroughly enjoyable course for the critical thinker who would like to improve their quality of life. Professor Satterfield’s presentation is warm and engaging as he deftly blends history, science, inspirational stories, and case studies in each lecture.

As you progress through the course, you will:

  • gain a comprehensive understanding of the complex relationship between cognitions, emotions, and behavior;
  • see how a very empirical process can be applied to very emotional situations;
  • find success through analyzing situations in which you failed to achieve your goals;
  • ramp up your positive emotions and moderate the negative ones; and
  • understand the full scope of treatment options available.

With the tools in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the desire to improve your situation, you can create lasting change in your life simply with the power of your own mind.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Techniques for Retraining Your Brain [TTC Video]

Machiavelli in Context [TTC Video]

Machiavelli in Context [TTC Video]
Machiavelli in Context [TTC Video] by William R Cook
Course No 4311 | AVI, XviD, 640x432 | MP3, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | 4.19GB

Mentioning the name Niccolò Machiavelli can unleash a powerful response, even among people who have never read a word of his writings. Our language even has a word—Machiavellian—that encapsulates the images those responses conjure up:

  • An indistinct figure quietly making his way through the darkest corridors of power, hatching plots to play one rival against another
  • A cold-blooded political liar, ready to justify any duplicity undertaken in the name of a noble end that will ultimately justify the most malignant means
  • A coolly practical leader—amoral at best—willing to do whatever is necessary in a world governed not by ideas of right or wrong, but by solutions dictated by realpolitik.
  • But does the Machiavelli most of us think we know bear any resemblance to the Machiavelli who lived, pondered, and wrote?

According to Professor William R. Cook, a reading of Machiavelli that considers only those qualities that we today call "Machiavellian" is incomplete, and Machiavelli himself "certainly would not recognize" such sinister interpretations or caricatures of his writings and beliefs. Indeed, The Prince—on the pages of which so much of this image was built—was not even published in his lifetime.

Meet an Extraordinary Student of History

In the 24 lectures that make up Machiavelli in Context, Professor Cook offers the opportunity to meet an extraordinarily thoughtful and sincere student of history and its lessons, and to learn that there is far more to him than can be gleaned from any reading of The Prince, no matter how thorough.

Although The Prince is the work by which most of us think we know Machiavelli, and although some have indeed called it the first and most important book of political science ever written, it was not, according to Professor Cook, either Machiavelli's most important work or the one most representative of his beliefs. Those distinctions belong, instead, to his Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy, a longer work started at about the same time and which would, like The Prince, not be published until well after his death.

"Everyone who has seriously studied the works of Machiavelli agrees that he ... believed in the superiority of a republican form of government, defined as a mixed constitution with elements of monarchy, aristocracy, and democracy.

"Once we recover the context of the writing of The Prince, and analyze it along with the Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy, it will be clear how The Prince can be read as a book designed to guide leaders in the creation—for Machiavelli, restoration—of republican government in Italy.

"Ultimately, Machiavelli's goal wasn't much different from ours. It was to live in a free and equal participatory society, because he believed that was the greatest way in which human beings could live and flourish."

In fact, says Professor Cook, "Machiavelli's republican thought influenced the development of institutions and values both in Europe and in America."

Learn Machiavelli's Most Important Ideas

To present a complete and well-rounded picture of Machiavelli's ideas on how human societies should be organized and governed, Professor Cook sets aside much of Machiavelli's written output—which included the political work The Art of War, a biography, many letters, and even some plays—to focus on The Prince, the Discourses, and, more briefly, his Florentine Histories.

In doing so, Professor Cook draws on the same qualities so evident in his previous courses for The Teaching Company: Tocqueville and the American Experience, Dante's Divine Comedy, Francis of Assisi, and St. Augustine's Confessions.

Teaching in the relaxed and informal style of those courses, Professor Cook moves easily among the different disciplines so pertinent to an understanding of Machiavelli's ideas, including history, philosophy, government, and the elements of leadership. He is unfailingly clear, always provides any definitions needed to understand the material at hand, and is always ready with a touch of wit whenever that is appropriate.

Because so much of our contemporary misunderstanding of Machiavelli's ideas comes from a lack of context, Professor Cook carefully sets the stage for a complete perspective of Machiavelli's world.

Long before he turns to the works themselves, you'll have learned about Florence and its political history, both before and during Machiavelli's lifetime; the developing Renaissance culture of Machiavelli's time, especially as it bears on the use of ancient political thought by writers and political leaders; and Machiavelli's own life story, including his education, service to the Florentine Republic, years spent in exile south of Florence, and the ways each period of his life affected his writings.

A Stunning and Original Thinker

The result is a thorough grounding in the information one needs to understand and appreciate this stunningly original thinker.

You'll learn, for example, what Machiavelli means when he discusses the important ideas of virtù and Fortuna.

Though these are today invariably translated as virtue and fortune, Machiavelli's meanings can involve much more. Though he sometimes uses virtù in the sense we would understand today, he often uses the word—which comes from the classical Latin word for Man—as a means of describing the way one practices successful statecraft: aggressively, with no reluctance to use lies, deceit, and cruelty that may be required to maintain power, and hence the stability the people deserve.

In a similar way Machiavelli uses Fortuna in a different sense than might have been used by, say, Dante when he describes the vagaries of fate over which we have no control.

Instead, Machiavelli uses the adage, "Fortune is like a river." Though we cannot control fortune, which may well choose to make the river flood, a good ruler, practicing virtù, can indeed prepare for it, and thus modify its effects.

You'll see how Machiavelli first became exposed to history and one of its earliest great practitioners—the Roman historian, Livy—through his own experience of Fortuna.

Though printed books such as Livy's Early History of Rome were too expensive for a family like the young Machiavelli's in the 15th century, his father did own a copy. He had written the index, and a copy of the book had been part of his payment. Thus Machiavelli grew up with the volumes about which he would one day write his own most important work, Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy.

You'll be introduced to Cesare Borgia, the son of Pope Alexander VI and the man regarded as Machiavelli's model for The Prince, especially in the way his actions embodied the virtù so important to Machiavelli.

Hear a Shocking but Illustrative Story

Professor Cook brings this out in a shocking story of Borgia's use of a tough and merciless Spaniard—Ramiro d'Orco—to impose order and stability on the area of north central Italy known as the Romagna that had come under Borgia's rule and was beset by crime and violence.

D'Orco's brutal methods had the desired effect. And when the job was completed, the local people emerged from their homes one morning to find the two halves of Ramiro d'Orco's body on opposite sides of the town square of Cesana, because d'Orco had been too tough, and Cesare Borgia needed a way to advertise further his concern for the people whose loyalty he wanted.

The story also embodies, for Machiavelli, the idea that cruelty can be "well-used," just as being merciful—withholding such cruelty when a leader deems it needed—may be less than merciful in its long-term impact.

Finally, you will get to see, throughout these lectures, the development of Machiavelli's reliance on history for its lessons, his role as a Renaissance Humanist thinker, and the emergence of his republican views, which still have tremendous influence today as we ask how republics start, grow, succeed, or fail.

As Professor Cook notes, we are not going to agree with all of Machiavelli's answers. But his commitment to asking the right questions—to thinking, reflecting, and learning everything history has to teach us about the best ways to govern and safeguard the future—was total.

Machiavelli in Context [TTC Video]

The Science of Integrative Medicine [TTC Video]

The Science of Integrative Medicine [TTC Video]
The Science of Integrative Medicine [TTC Video] by Brent A Bauer
Course No 1948 | M4V, AVC, 854x480 | AAC, 155 kbps, 2 Ch | 12x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 1.27GB

Perhaps you’ve heard rumors about an herbal supplement that acts as the Fountain of Youth, improves your mood, and helps you lose weight. Maybe you’ve considered trying hypnosis to stop smoking, but you’ve heard it might be just a waste of money. You may be curious about how getting stuck with many sharp needles can actually alleviate pain and stress—when it seems like it should do the opposite.

If you’ve ever considered herbal supplements, meditation, acupuncture, yoga, or even a change of diet to promote better health, then you already know that the subject of what’s been called “alternative medicine” is both intriguing, offering help for conditions that might seem hopeless, and controversial, with its effectiveness touted by some and scoffed at by others.

The Science of Integrative Medicine, produced in collaboration with Mayo Clinic—widely regarded as one of the finest health institutions on the planet—provides you with 12 informative lectures on the science-based facts and historical context of commonly used integrative treatments. Delivering a foundational explanation of this wide and diverse new field of medicine, this course is designed to empower you and give you the knowledge you need to explore how to use these techniques to improve your wellness. Taught by Brent Bauer, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, this course provides you with an illuminating exploration of many genuinely beneficial treatments.

In the last two decades, as a wide array of practices have gained greater acceptance as potential forms of treatment and healing, the terms used to describe them have evolved as well. Complementary and alternative medicine, or CAM, was once the common name for therapies once considered “alternative” or “unorthodox.” Today, as physicians integrate more of these treatments into their medical practices, the term CAM has given way to integrative medicine.

Integrative medicine describes the integration of natural or holistic practices into the health-care paradigm to complement conventional Western medicine and promote wellness. Western medicine can accomplish incredible feats of healing, but as advanced as it is, it still doesn’t have cures for everything. Relying solely on conventional Western medicine, people often wait until they have serious health problems before seeking care—but integrative medicine includes many practices that are particularly good for preventing certain conditions and ameliorating the effects of others, making it a valuable adjunct to conventional care.

The therapies discussed in this course have been shown to help people reach health goals such as pre-surgery preparation, post-surgery recovery, and better management—and reduction—of chronic pain. The advent of integrative medicine has been revolutionizing Western medical care as doctors realize that their options for patient care can be expanded to a plethora of complementary practices that directly benefit wellness and can help alleviate, prevent, or remedy issues such as arthritis, chronic back or neck pain, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer’s disease, high blood pressure, stress, heart disease, menopause, and the common cold.

Tour the Most Common Integrative Practices

In The Science of Integrative Medicine, Dr. Bauer, of Mayo Clinic, introduces you to more than a dozen scientifically tested, integrative approaches and explains what they do and do not treat, empowering you to take your health options into your own hands. He leads you through the science and history of some of the most common practices and discusses the pros and cons of each. He also offers suggestions for when and how you might consider talking to your doctor about including these therapies in your wellness plan. Through this course, you’ll learn about:

Treatments by professionals:

  • Acupuncture involves inserting thin needles at strategic points on the body. It is commonly used to treat nausea, fibromyalgia, and many kinds of pain.
  • Hypnosis induces a trance-like state where the mind is more open to suggestion. Hypnosis may be used to help manage pain, anxiety, and tension headaches, as well as to treat addiction and change negative patterns of behavior.
  • Massage can address pain, anxiety, tension, and chronic conditions, as well as aid in pre-surgery preparation and post-surgery healing.
  • Spinal manipulation is practiced by chiropractors and physical therapists. It can be particularly helpful for lower back pain.

Treatments you can do on your own:

  • Meditation involves calming and clearing the mind. It is used to help treat anxiety, stress, high blood pressure, acute or chronic pain, and many other issues.
  • Music therapy can benefit your mental and physical health. It may help people with Alzheimer’s disease and autism, as well as depression.
  • Guided imagery involves bringing to mind a specific image or a series of memories to produce certain responses in the body. It’s used to treat headaches and some forms of pain.
  • Spirituality often involves an individual’s connection to others and a search for meaning and happiness in life. These connections have been shown to help people deal with medical illness and chronic disease.

And physical exercises:

  • Tai chi is a graceful exercise in which you move from pose to pose. It’s been shown to improve balance and flexibility.
  • Yoga often involves a series of physical postures and a focus on breathing. Yoga is commonly practiced to relieve stress, as well as to treat heart disease and depression.

In addition to teaching you about specific practices, Dr. Bauer reveals the key to getting the most out of any form of integrative medicine: a solid foundation of wellness that includes simple lifestyle changes that can lead to significant improvements in your health. For example, you’ll hear about the concept of NESS, which is based on research that demonstrates how a program involving diet, exercise, stress management, and social support can reverse the aging process on a cellular level in a test group.

The Good, The Bad, and the FDA Unapproved

Dr. Bauer provides an in-depth investigation into a number of popular myths about integrative medicine without resorting to oversimplifying or generalizing. He kicks off this exploration with a review of the positive and negative effects of herbal remedies.

A lot of the skepticism about herbal remedies comes from the fact that they are not FDA-approved. On a supplement’s packaging, you may see this: “This statement has not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.” Dr. Bauer sheds light on what this really implies and why it may not always be cause for concern. At the same time, he cautions us against some common herbs, which, at their worst, have been known to cause death. Receiving medical guidance about herbal remedies is vital. Even commonly used herbs, such as chamomile, can cause serious harm to someone with a severe allergy.

The conclusion Dr. Bauer reaches is that when working with a doctor, most herbal supplements can be used effectively. Dr. Bauer helps you do your homework to become a well-informed and wise patient and consumer when it comes to herbal supplements, so that you can make the best decisions for your optimal health.

A Trusted Source of Information

This course is an up-to-date and authoritative exploration of integrative medicine. Dr. Bauer is a Professor of Medicine, and he has been the director of the Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic for 15 years. His main research interest has been the scientific evaluation of complementary therapies, where his work is at the forefront of the emerging field of integrative medicine, combining the best of conventional Western medicine with the best of evidence-based complementary therapies. Dr. Bauer and Mayo Clinic—an indisputably trusted resource for medical facts—provide evidence for the effectiveness, benefits, and drawbacks of integrative therapies in a straightforward, well-organized, and thorough manner, making the benefits of each practice easy to understand and accessible to everyone.

The Science of Integrative Medicine will help you take a proactive approach to your health and wellness. As you delve deeply into integrative practices and learn the science behind how and why they work, you’ll gain a deeper appreciation for why Western doctors are now evaluating and incorporating such practices into an array of tools at their disposal to help you reach and maintain wellness. At the conclusion of the course, you’ll find yourself to be a more informed decision-maker. And you’ll see that by working with your doctor to discuss the scientifically backed practices you feel comfortable with, it is possible to put together an integrative program that can positively affect your health.

The Science of Integrative Medicine [TTC Video]

pages: 055 056 057 058 059 060 061 062 063 064 065
*100: 100