Practical Philosophy: The Greco-Roman Moralists [TTC Video]

Practical Philosophy: The Greco-Roman Moralists [TTC Video]
Practical Philosophy: The Greco-Roman Moralists [TTC Video] by Luke Timothy Johnson
Course No 4473 | MP4/AVI, AVC, 600x454/624x480 | AAC/AC3, 96/192 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | 7.06GB

Imagine a course that teaches you not only how to think like the great philsophers, but how to live. Greeks and Romans of the early imperial period are often overlooked in the annals of philosophical study, but provided down-to-earth advice on how to live a solid, happy life. Professor Luke Timothy Johnson returns to The Teaching Company to study these geat thinkers with you.

Classical Greek philosophers such as Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle are fine—if lofty thinking is what you want. But philosophy means love of wisdom, not love of thinking. What about solid advice on how to be a good father or friend; or how to grow old gracefully, or know what true happiness is? Where can you find philosophy that tells you not how to think well, but how to live well? That practical philosophy can be found in the works of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, Dio Chrysostom, and Plutarch of Chaeronea, among others. These Greeks and Romans of the early imperial period—from the 1st century B.C.E. to the 2nd century C.E.—devoted their lives not to metaphysics and epistemology but to the appreciation and practice of morality and virtue, values and character. In Practical Philosophy: The Greco-Roman Moralists, Professor Luke Timothy Johnson introduces you to the sages who, as group, represent the missing page of the history of philosophy. Although their names are sometimes familiar, as in the case of Cicero and Plutarch, their philosophy is not.

Practical Philosophy: The Greco-Roman Moralists [TTC Video]

Nutrition Made Clear [TTC Video]

Nutrition Made Clear [TTC Video]
Nutrition Made Clear [TTC Video] by Roberta H Anding
Course No 1950 | MP4, MPEG4, 640x480 | AAC, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 36x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 7.77GB

Making smart eating choices is essential to living a healthy, happy, and successful life. Yet all too often, we're exposed to information and techniques that promise quick and easy results but can be harmful to your overall health: crash diets, experimental medications, ever-changing studies on what you should eat more or less of, and more. It can be confusing to dig through the mass of hype, myth, and misconceptions about good nutrition habits. So in the face of potentially misleading information and aids, where can you find the key to nutritional success?

The answer: in understanding the concepts, practices, and science behind good nutrition. Once you master the intricate—and undeniably captivating—interaction between what you eat and its effect on your body and mind, you unlock a powerful and scientifically proven tool to use in the quest for maintaining or improving your personal health.

Nutrition Made Clear is your opportunity to finally sort through nutrition misconceptions and replace them with hard science you can understand. In 36 in-depth lectures taught by dietitian and award-winning Professor Roberta H. Anding, you explore the fundamentals of good nutrition and get a practical and personal guide to applying these fundamentals to your unique lifestyle. Designed to appeal to anyone at any age, this course is an invaluable source of medically backed, statistically proven information about the guidelines for healthy eating and living.

Your Prescription for Good Nutrition

As scientific knowledge and technology have rapidly advanced, we now know that everything you eat and drink has an effect on your mind and body. The essential elements and nutrients contained in food help you in a host of ways, including

  • strengthening your immune system,
  • optimizing the function of your brain,
  • protecting you from illness and disease,
  • and much more.

Because of this invaluable knowledge, you now have the ability to achieve lasting personal health and wellness—more so than at any point in history. By eating right, increasing your physical activity, reducing the risk of chronic illness through wise personal choices, and more, you can stay healthy and active throughout the majority of your life.

Nutrition is an applied science, which means that its power lies not just in grasping the concepts behind it, but in applying those concepts to daily living. In the organized lectures of Nutrition Made Clear, you

  • discover the relatively recent history of nutrition science;
  • learn where to find authoritative—and how to avoid unsafe—nutrition information;
  • master the science behind digestion, protein, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, calories, fiber, and other concepts;
  • uncover where you can find nutrients in the foods you eat and the distinct role they play in good health;
  • recognize what your personal daily requirements of each nutrient should be;
  • examine what happens when you get too little—or too much—of a nutrient in your diet; and
  • find out how smarter nutritional choices can radically reduce your risk of developing serious health issues such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, and digestive disorders.

Professor Anding also brings nutrition into your own life and home, with lectures that teach you how to make wise eating choices a daily part of your life and how to ensure lasting health. You learn

  • how to correctly read a food label to make sure you're getting the nutrients you need,
  • how to build your own distinct exercise regimen,
  • how to safely integrate herbal therapies and remedies into your diet, and
  • how to recognize when you should eat organic foods instead of conventional foods.

Nutrition on a Personal Level

Every lecture of Nutrition Made Clear starts with one of Professor Anding's personal anecdotes from more than 25 years of experience as a practicing dietitian. After detailing the science behind the particular topic, she concludes each lecture with a brief Frequently Asked Questions section, in which she addresses practical questions with important bearings on your everyday life, such as:

  • Is drinking tea in the morning better for you than drinking coffee?
  • Which fiber-rich foods can you choose when you're eating in a restaurant?
  • Does taking a Vitamin C supplement affect other medications or supplements you might be taking?
  • Do herbal therapies used to treat medical issues actually work?

Similarly, the course concludes with an entire lecture devoted to answering questions about good nutrition you've always wanted to know but didn't know where to find the answers. Or whom to ask.

Invaluable Tips for Everyday Eating

Even as Professor Anding details the science behind healthy eating and exercise habits, she always makes each lecture of Nutrition Made Clear both practical and personal. As you learn about calories, carbohydrates, and more, you frequently discover a wealth of invaluable—and sometimes even surprising—tips you can easily apply to your own eating habits, including these:

  • Drink your cereal milk: Many of us discard the milk at the bottom of our cereal bowls. However, since many important vitamins and minerals are sprayed on cereal, you miss out on essential nutrients washed off by the milk when you do so.
  • Control your calories: Contrary to popular belief, it is calorie counting and not dieting that is the lifelong solution to losing weight—and maintaining that loss.
  • Watch out for "the shine": When eating out, watch out for salads, pastas, meats, and other dishes that appear to "shine." This usually means the food contains extra—and unnecessary—fats and oils.
  • Pay attention to portion size: When reading nutrition labels, make sure to do so with portion sizes in mind, as what may appear to be low in calories may have an incredibly small serving size.

Professor Anding also teaches you how to calculate your own dietary needs, how to create your own nutrition and exercise plans, how to recognize that a product or service is really a health fraud, and more.

Maintain and Improve Your Well-Being

What makes Nutrition Made Clear so unique is that it recognizes just how personal your own nutritional needs can be, and it outlines direct steps to show you how to customize the lessons you learn in these lectures to your lifestyle. This is due in great part to Professor Anding's wealth of experience as a health educator both inside and outside the academic world.

For more than 25 years, she has educated adults of all ages about the merits of good nutrition in her role as teacher and lecturer at both the Baylor College of Medicine and Rice University. In addition, outside of a university setting, Professor Anding is a registered dietitian in Texas, a registered dietitian with the American Dietetic Association, a certified diabetes educator, a certified specialist in sports dietetics, and the dietitian for the Houston Texans NFL franchise.

Her research and teaching is continually focused on finding ways to improve the health and well-being of Americans, and it is this passion that forms the core of this fascinating course. Crafted with the needs of individual people in mind, Nutrition Made Clear is both a fascinating learning experience and the perfect investment in your personal health—one that will educate you, motivate you, and reward you for the rest of your life.

Nutrition Made Clear [TTC Video]

Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle [TTC Video]

Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle [TTC Video]
Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle [TTC Video] by Robert C Bartlett
Course No 4460 | AVI, XviD, 640x480 | MP3, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 36x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 4.56GB

For more than two millennia, philosophers have grappled with life's most profound issues. It is easy to forget, however, that these "eternal" questions are not eternal at all; rather, they once had to be asked for the first time. It was the Athenian citizen and philosopher Socrates who first asked these questions in the 5th century B.C. "Socrates," notes award-winning Professor Robert C. Bartlett, "was responsible for a fundamentally new way of philosophizing": trying to understand the world by reason.

Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle, a 36-lecture course taught by Professor Bartlett, provides you with a detailed analysis of the golden age of Athenian philosophy and the philosophical consequences that occurred when Socrates—followed first by his student Plato and then by Plato's own student Aristotle—permanently altered our approach to the most important questions humanity can pose.

What Was the "Socratic Turn"?

The Socratic break with earlier philosophy was a shift in thought that led to some of the most important and intellectually exciting concepts in all of philosophy. Socrates' influence on a new generation of philosophers, most importantly, Plato and Aristotle, ensured that his ideas would change the face of philosophy.

Prior to Socrates' new approach, philosophy was concerned primarily with the project of "natural philosophy": a prescientific study of nature and the physical world. Professor Bartlett begins the course with a discussion of how Socrates came to the "Socratic turn" that veered away from the study of natural science and toward the scrutiny of moral opinion. You recognize how crucial this turn was because it became the fulcrum around which a new era of philosophy turne. Never again could philosophers return to their ancient role of merely attempting to grasp the natural order of a world previously ascribed to the planning or whimsy of the gods.

The new arguments that Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle posed were intended not for other philosophers but for anyone seeking to live a thoughtful and attentive life. Throughout the course, you come to see how their inquiries about the fundamental meanings and implications of ideas like justice, virtue, and happiness pushed their fellow citizens to ponder the roles such ideas played in their daily lives and in society. They even asked their peers to consider whether these and other questions were ones that anyone could hope to answer.

See Socrates through Plato's Eyes

Unfortunately, the thinker who forever altered the course of philosophy never actually wrote down his words. So how can we hope to know what Socrates, whom many believe to be the foundational thinker of Western philosophy, really believed?

The answer, Professor Bartlett shows, lies in the fact that much of Socrates' philosophy is captured in the writings of his contemporaries and followers. As a means of leading you to a sharper picture of the real Socrates, the course introduces you to the writings of three key figures:

  • Xenophon: the great thinker and military commander who wrote a series of Socratic sayings that survives to this day
  • Aristophanes: whose comic play Clouds is both a send-up and a thoughtful critique of Socrates that is crucial to understanding his philosophical evolution
  • Plato: a brilliant young man from a wealthy and politically active family who became Socrates' best student and whose works, written in the form of dialogues between two or more persons, feature Socrates as the protagonist

Plato, in particular, is an essential source of information about Socrates. Over the course of a dozen lectures, you explore the wide variety of Plato's brilliant dialogues and how they reflect the core of Socrates' philosophy of morality and justice:

  • Alcibiades I, which depicts Socrates' reasoning why the young Alcibiades needs him
  • Symposium, in which seven partiers discuss the nature of love
  • Republic, perhaps Plato's best-known work, which focuses on the definition and nature of justice
  • Protagoras, in which Socrates and Protagoras argue whether virtue can be taught
  • Gorgias, which depicts an argument over who is more important, the philosopher or the rhetorician
  • Meno, which seeks to come to a general definition of virtue

Professor Bartlett then turns the discussion to those Platonic dialogues that cover the well-known trial and execution of Socrates at the hands of the Athenian state. By examining Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates, and Crito as a whole, you develop a deeper understanding of the defense strategy Socrates chose, why he chose it, and how it ultimately failed him. You also review whether Plato's sympathetic defense of his teacher was successful in the long run.

Aristotle's Philosophy of Human Affairs

Throughout Masters of Greek Thought, Professor Bartlett guides you deep into nuanced philosophical discussions while keeping the thread of the arguments both clear and exhilarating. This becomes especially important when you focus on the third iconic philosopher this course covers: Aristotle.

A student of Plato's famed Academy, Aristotle did more than anyone to establish a comprehensive system of philosophy in the West. His work encompassed the fields of morality, politics, aesthetics, logic, science, rhetoric, theology, metaphysics, and more. Scholars today believe that only about a third of his work survives.

In keeping with the theme of the course, Professor Bartlett, who has translated selected works by Xenophon and Plato from the original Greek, focuses your attention on Aristotle's work on the philosophy of human affairs. You delve into two of the philosopher's major writings:

  • Nicomachean Ethics, which is a stunning approach to questions of virtue and moral character
  • Politics, which continues the ideas of individual and interpersonal ethics first developed in Nichomachean Ethics and discusses their logical extension into the governance of the city-state

Learn from Socrates and His Heirs

A distinguished teacher and translator and the recipient of numerous teaching awards, including an award for excellence in teaching in the social sciences from Emory University's Center for Teaching and Curriculum, Professor Bartlett keeps his presentation of these three great thinkers not only clear but also accessible, unintimidating, and relevant to each of us today.

The insights Masters of Greek Thought offers into the minds of these three foundational figures of Western philosophy and the care with which Professor Bartlett unpacks their words bring the ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle into sharp focus for you. More than 2,000 years later, you find their questions on the nature of justice, virtue, and happiness pushing you to ponder the roles such ideas play in your daily life and in the life of your society.

Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle [TTC Video]

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