Introduction to C++: Programming Concepts and Applications [TTC Video]

Introduction to C++: Programming Concepts and Applications [TTC Video]
Introduction to C++: Programming Concepts and Applications [TTC Video] by Professor John Keyser, PhD
Course No 2074 | MP4, AVC, 1372 kbps, 960x540 | AAC, 128 kbps, 2 Ch | 25x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 8.35GB

Considering how many hours we spend with computers—phones, laptops, even “smart” screens on our home appliances—it’s easy to feel like they control us. But, in fact, we control them. Or, we do if we know how to use them.That’s what computer programming gets to the heart of: taking command of the most powerful, versatile, and productive machines ever invented. And among the array of programming languages designed to get computers doing exactly what we want, C++ ranks as one of the most efficient, powerful, and popular.

Introduction to C++: Programming Concepts and Applications is a 24-lecture, step-by-step guide to this celebrated computer language, which is well suited to a multitude of coding projects. Taught by award-winning Professor John Keyser of Texas A&M University, the course quickly moves from basic principles to more advanced concepts in coding. Anyone curious about how software works will find it an accessible path to computer literacy and to understanding how programmers think across a range of programming styles.

In widespread use since the 1990s, C++ has become ubiquitous in business, science, education, and entertainment. The program’s countless applications include:

  • Personal computing and web browsing: C++ underlies key sections of major operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, and Linux. Plus, many popular websites are written at least partly in C++, including YouTube, Facebook, Amazon, PayPal, and Google’s search engine.
  • Embedded control systems: Computer control through C++ is at the heart of a multitude of complex systems—from CT scanners and automobiles to wind turbines, ships, airplanes, and rockets. Even on faraway Mars, NASA rovers guide themselves across the planet with the aid of C++.
  • Games, business transactions, and more: The efficiency of C++ makes it ideal for video games, which require flexible programming and lightning speed. The same qualities apply to any performance-critical code, such as stock trading, telecommunications, and computer-aided design.

Learn to Code

For all of its sophistication, C++ was designed to be straightforward, logical, and adaptable to any programming style. It succeeded beyond its developer’s most optimistic projections, paving the way for coders to work at every level—from manipulating individual computer bits to tackling the heights of abstract programming, where a single concept can apply across a wide range of applications.

Along with Professor Keyser’s detailed, informative instruction, this course also gives you helpful tools like a 20-minute “quick-start” guide, which can help you log on to a web-based programming editor with your computer, or other device. Heavily illustrated, the course features onscreen code that follows Professor Keyser’s many examples, reproducing what you’ll see as you program along with him. Introduction to C++ also includes an extensive guidebook that features dozens of coding problems, a syntax guide, a glossary, and direct links to code files used in the course.

From Loops to Artificial Intelligence

C++ was created to incorporate all of the more "machine level" features of the language C, while also adding more higher-level abilities in all the major programming styles. The name "C++" alludes, playfully, to an incrementing operator “++,” whose effect is to increase a variable by one unit. “C++” therefore signals a program that goes one better than C. Indeed, it goes considerably beyond that. Here are the major programming styles available in C++:

  • Procedural programming: Reflecting one of the earliest styles of programming, this approach gives the computer step-by-step instructions, organized into separate functions. With patience, procedural programming is as easy to grasp as a set of directions to reach a destination—which can be simple or complex, depending on where you are going.
  • Object-oriented programming: This is where C++ makes a giant leap beyond C. Object-oriented programming mirrors the nature of many real problems. For example, if you are designing code for a series of games, it can be very helpful to design the features that all the games have in common (having a board, taking turns, and so on) separately from the rules and other features specific to each game. This is where concepts such as classes, encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism all come to life.
  • Generic programming: Also improving on C is the ability to handle ideas that are so general that they are not confined to a specific type of data. By creating templates that specify different ways of handling information, regardless of what it is, a level of automation is achieved that saves substantial time in coding.

Focusing on these three broad approaches, you cover the full range of techniques in the C++ toolkit, from the basics of sequential programming with loops and conditionals, through procedural programming with functions, through object-oriented programming with classes, and through generic programming and the use of the Standard Template Library (STL). And in the last lecture, you draw on your accumulated knowledge from object-oriented programming and generic algorithms to design a program that can play a game with human-like intelligence—a hallmark of the exciting field of artificial intelligence.

Coding Strategies to the Rescue

In several lectures spread across the course, Professor Keyser also introduces you to strategies that will come to your rescue when the inevitable coding problems arise. A good example is debugging—a crucial step for any program and one avoided, or approached poorly, by many novice programmers. Professor Keyser demonstrates following six steps when you get a dreaded error message: isolate the error, narrow in on the failure point, identify the problem, fix the problem, test the code, and finally consider similar cases where the error you’ve fixed might reappear elsewhere in your program. “There is no shortcut,” he advises. “You’ve got to use your brain”—which is exactly what he teaches you to do throughout this stimulating course.

By the end of Introduction to C++, you will be primed to take your programming skills to the next level in three areas:

  • Master greater programming complexity: Students in university computer science programs usually go here next, learning new approaches to writing algorithms and structuring data—goals that C++ can meet with flexibility to spare.
  • Focus on specific applications: After learning the impressive capabilities of C++, you may want to focus on applications that hold special interest for you, whether it’s computer graphics, games, data analytics, or some other programming field.
  • Branch out to new computer languages: C++ is an ideal foundation for learning almost any other computer language, such as C#, Java, or Javascript. Regardless of what language you turn to next, you will find that knowing C++ gives you a huge head start.

It’s little wonder that C++ is one of the most in-demand programming languages ever developed. And in this superbly taught course, you will find that learning C++ is also an eminently enjoyable adventure.

What’s New about the C++ Guidebook?

Because the Introduction to C++ Programming course is for computer users, we chose to omit the print guidebook and focus instead on creating an enhanced digital guidebook.

Features include:

  • rich, in-depth coverage of lecture content at the level of a companion book
  • code presented in the lecture, in a format that can also be copied directly to your computer
  • four-color layout that enhances readability of code, callouts, diagrams, key terms, and more
  • “landscape” layout with text and code presented on same page
  • many hyperlinks that enhance navigation and ease of use
  • quizzes that include basic interactivity
  • hyperlinked glossary
  • C++ syntax guide

We hope users like this enhanced format and find it MORE helpful than a printed guidebook. For users that prefer printed materials, a printed transcript book of this course is available for purchase. However, most users will be much BETTER served by the enhanced digital guidebook for this course.

Introduction to C++: Programming Concepts and Applications [TTC Video]

Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature [TTC Video]

Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature [TTC Video]
Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature [TTC Video] by Professor Daniel Breyer, PhD
Course No 4189 | MP4, AVC, 1370 kbps, 960x540 | AAC, 126 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 7.79GB

You don’t consider yourself evil, do you? Of course not! No one does. And yet, the world is full of violence and suffering. We hear the stories in the news. We see the images online. We know too well how bad things can be, but if we’re sure of anything, we’re sure that we’re not like those who do evil. But what makes us so sure? It’s an uncomfortable question, but how different are we, really? Is it possible that we actually share something in common with those who’ve done the worst humanity has to offer? After all, we’re all human. Aren’t we?

In the 24 lectures of Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature, Professor Daniel Breyer takes you on a fascinating philosophical journey into some of the deepest—and darkest—questions that have haunted humanity for millennia. In exploring the dark side of human nature, you won’t just explore what it means to be evil; you’ll explore humanity’s fragile underbelly by investigating such topics as our thirst for vengeance, our tendency toward anger, our inability to do what we know is right, and much more. These are difficult topics, to be sure, and at least for some people, it would be easier to look away, rather than investigate them. But the truth is that unless we honestly confront who we are in all its sordid glory, we’ll never fully understand ourselves. We’ll never fully appreciate who we really are—or who we might ultimately become.

A Cross-Cultural Approach

Thinkers from across the world and in many different eras have considered the dark side of human nature, and that’s why this course will adopt a cross-cultural approach, investigating perspectives from many different traditions—from the Hindu Bhagavad Gita and the Buddhist Way of the Bodhisattva to the Christian Bible and the scholarship of contemporary philosophers and psychologists. In this course, you won’t just find yourself seeking answers to some of life’s biggest questions—you’ll also discover entirely new ideas from traditions you’ve not yet encountered.

This multi-cultural approach will help you see humanity from many perspectives, providing a wider opportunity for you to find your own answers. With Professor Breyer’s expert guidance, you will engage with a wide range of great thinkers, including:

  • Confucian philosopher Mencius;
  • Doaist thinker Zhuangzi;
  • Stoic philosopher Seneca;
  • Christian theologian Augustine of Hippo;
  • Buddhist monk and scholar Shantideva (or Œāntideva);
  • Existentialist thinker Albert Camus;
  • English philosopher Miranda Fricker;
  • American psychologist Paul Bloom; and many more.

Fascinating Questions

This course is fueled by the power of questions, one of philosophy’s most potent tools. Some are questions we have all asked ourselves: Why are people violent? Is anyone just born evil? Why is there so much suffering in the world? We might ask these questions with a certain level of cynicism, or perhaps sadness, not even expecting a real answer, but philosophers have taken these fundamental questions seriously for thousands of years. Mining insights from many different philosophical traditions, Professor Breyer provides some fascinating responses to these and many other dark questions, while offering guidance on how to build flourishing and meaningful lives in the face of darkness.

As you’ll discover, confronting the dark side of human nature is sometimes messy. You won’t find every point of view completely satisfying, and sometimes you won’t even know which arguments to believe, but you will be constantly engaged in an ongoing conversation with an expert guide whose goal is to help you think for yourself and reach your own answers to difficult questions like these:

  • If someone does something evil, does that mean they’re an evil person?
  • What does it say about us if we do something awful in our dreams?
  • Is it rational to fear death?
  • Do we live in a just world, where victims are to blame for their own suffering?
  • Can anything good come from painful emotions like anger and grief?
  • Is there something wired into human nature that drives us to kill others?
  • Is anyone ever beyond redemption or forgiveness?
  • With so much suffering in the world, how can we create meaningful lives?

Exploring the Dark Side through Stories and Thought Experiments

Stories and thought experiments are powerful, and that’s why thinkers from many different traditions have used them to explore difficult questions. In Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature, you will encounter fascinating thought experiments and stories—some fictional, some drawn from the headlines—that concretize abstract ideas and help us find meaning in our own lives.

Among many others, you will explore:

  • Gyges’ Ring. Plato tells of Gyges, a man who found a ring that could make him invisible. With help from this newfound power, he seduced the king’s wife, killed the king, and took over the entire kingdom. If we had a mechanism for escaping punishment, would we honestly live a just life, or one that took us to the dark side?
  • Zen Parable of the Two Brothers. Two brothers were shopping when they noticed an aging woman who needed help. The older brother carried her and her bags to her car. The younger brother was upset the woman hadn’t said, “Thank you,” and he brought that up again and again later in the day. The older brother responded, “Little brother, I set that woman down hours ago. Why are you still carrying her?” Why do we have a craving for things to go a particular way and allow ourselves to be distraught when they don’t?
  • A Mother’s Grief. In a famous Buddhist story, a woman loses her baby and becomes overcome with grief, looking for medicine that could bring him back to life. The Buddha says he will help if she can find a pinch of mustard seed from a household untouched by the suffering of death. She finds the spice easily enough, but every household shares a story about a loved one lost. Is it possible that grief, one of our darkest emotions, is valuable to us, as we learn positive lessons about life and the need for community?
  • The Luck of the Two Partygoers. Two people attend a party, drink beyond the point of legal intoxication, get in their separate cars to drive home, lose control of their cars, and swerve onto the sidewalk. In one case, a man standing on that sidewalk is killed. In the other, the sidewalk was empty. Both partygoers broke the law by driving while intoxicated. Should we judge them the same, or differently? How can we take responsibility for our actions, but recognize the role that luck plays in our lives?

These memorable thought experiments and stories, along with many others, will help you wrestle with big ideas and dark questions by grounding them in everyday experience and making them vividly real.

If we really want to understand ourselves and the world around us, we must confront humanity’s dark side. In Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature, you’ll do just that, while being guided by thinkers from across the world, with whom you’ll engage in a great conversation, as you attempt to find your own answers to life’s biggest—and darkest—questions. What will you do to confront your own dark side? How will you choose to live in this troubled world?

Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature [TTC Video]

Warriors, Queens, and Intellectuals: 36 Great Women before 1400 [TTC Video]

Warriors, Queens, and Intellectuals: 36 Great Women before 1400 [TTC Video]
Warriors, Queens, and Intellectuals: 36 Great Women before 1400 [TTC Video] by Joyce E Salisbury, PhD
Course No 3815 | .MP4, AVC, 1250 kbps, 854x480 | AAC, 192 kbps, 2 Ch | 36x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 10.96GB

Throughout history, women have played integral roles in family, society, religion, government, war—in short, in all aspects of human civilization. Powerful women have shaped laws, led rebellions, and played key roles in dynastic struggles. Some were caught up in forces beyond their control, while others manipulated and murdered their way to the top. However, unearthing their stories from the historical record has been a challenge, with the ordinary difficulties of preserving information across the generations increased by centuries of historical bias and gendered expectations. Women, when they were mentioned at all, often filled the role of virtuous maiden, self-effacing mother, or seductive villain. Imagine what you are missing when only half the story is being told.

In Warriors, Queens, and Intellectuals: 36 Great Women before 1400, taught by Professor Emerita of Humanistic Studies Joyce E. Salisbury, you will experience another side of history, one that has often been overlooked. In these 36 lectures, women step out from the footnotes and sidebars of traditional history and into the spotlight, illuminating the dark corners of the pre-modern world along the way. From thwarted daughters and ambitious wives to fearless revolutionaries and brilliant philosophers, you will see how women have played diverse roles throughout history and why their influence is so vital to a fuller understanding of the world we live in today. Beginning at the start of the Roman Empire and carrying you through to the end of the Middle Ages, Professor Salisbury will introduce you to dozens of influential women from all across the globe.

As you will see, there are many ways to wield power. Some women worked within the rules and expectations that bound them, using their unique influence as wives and mothers to shape politics, religion, and more. Meanwhile, others defied restrictions imposed on them, occupying places of leadership and power that changed the world. With this course, you will get the unique opportunity to explore their contributions to our history, and see major turning points and ideas through new perspectives.

Rebels and Rulers

From Rome and China to Persia and Byzantium, the world before 1400 saw the foundation and expansion of immense imperial powers. These powers were often hierarchical and rigidly patriarchal, and their presence imposed new systems of religion, tradition, and governance that forever altered the places they touched, often to the detriment of women who had held a certain level of power and respect within tribal communities before their arrival.

Striving to survive under these new conditions, some women took on the mantle of warrior and revolutionary, fighting for the good of their people in times of crisis. Their rebellions often failed in the face of insurmountable odds, yet their power as symbols of freedom (and cautionary tales) has lived on. In the case of the Trung sisters of Vietnam, their unsuccessful attempt to wrest their homeland from the hands of imperial invaders made them symbols of patriotism and resistance that survive in Vietnamese culture to this very day. Another famous rebel leader, the Celtic warrior queen, Boudicca, also ultimately failed in her attempt to defeat Rome. Her legend lives on, however, thanks to a revival led by one of the most powerful female leaders of the modern era, Queen Victoria.

There were those who fought against imperial powers, and then there were those who wielded power within those sprawling empires. Though few have heard her name, some modern scholars believe Sorkhakhtani was one of the most influential women in history, wielding immense authority in the Mongol empire at the height of its power. Plotina, Julia Maesa, Pulcheria, Wu Zetian, and Razia are just a few of the women you will encounter from all over the globe who achieved power, either through their own rule or that of their families. Some were benevolent and some were ruthless—often many of them were both—but they all left a mark on the world.

Saints and Sinners

Everyone loves a hero, but history is not painted in stark contrasts of black and white—and neither are the women whose stories you will uncover. As Professor Salisbury demonstrates, for every Vibia Perpetua or Joan of Arc who was martyred for a cause greater than themselves, there are many others who could certainly be considered selfish, amoral, or even villainous. (And many who were painted as weak or nefarious by historians with their own agendas.) This is one of the many important reasons historians work so hard to uncover the stories of overlooked and forgotten women: to reveal their many complex dimensions as people who were important to history, for both good and ill.

While many women throughout history were driven to act by a desire to protect themselves or their families, or to achieve greater freedom and control over their own lives, others had less laudable—but no less human—desires, such as:

  • Ambition. While Victorian-era artists and poets immortalized the death of John the Baptist as the cold-hearted request of the teenaged Salome, it was in fact her ambitious mother Herodias who requested the preacher’s head. Her unending hunger for status and wealth eventually led to exile—and dragged her daughter’s name through the historical mud in the process.
  • Power. In the quest for power, women have often proved themselves to be as ruthless as men. Some sources suggest that Zenobia, the queen of Palmyra, had her husband and step-son assassinated so she could rule as regent for her young son. Though she is remembered as a dynamic leader in the struggle against Roman rule and a mighty would-be empress, her path was fraught with moral compromise.
  • Vengeance. Freydis, the sister of Leif Eriksson, was a formidable Viking woman with a nasty temper. When she felt her claim to her brother’s property in the New World was under threat, she wasn’t afraid to manipulate those around her—and commit a few murders—to avenge an insult and protect what she believed was rightfully hers.

And some women gained fame not because they chose to rebel or seek great fortune, but because they were lucky—or unlucky—enough to be caught in the right place at the right time. Whether swept up in a tide of religious persecution or kidnapped by an invading army, you will meet many women who found ways to make their own mark on history and turn misfortune to their advantage.

Belles Lettres

Power isn’t always about wealth and political clout. Sometimes, it can come from something as simple as the ability to read and write. For centuries of human history, women were often denied access to literacy and education. Since most would live out their lives as the keepers of hearth and home, education for women was often considered unnecessary—or even morally dangerous. Despite these fears and the limitations they imposed, we know that some women were able to pursue knowledge and deeply influence fields such as:

  • Religion: The writings of Christian martyr Perpetua became so influential after her death that church leaders warned others not to treat them as scripture.
  • History: Byzantine princess Anna Comnena is credited with writing one of history’s greatest chronicles of the First Crusade.
  • Mathematics: Lubna of Córdoba was an astonishing mathematician who became an intellectual leader in a time and place where women were rarely accepted as public figures.
  • Literature: Lady Murasaki of Japan wrote what is now considered to be the first prose novel, hundreds of years before the novel would become a definitive literary form in Europe.
  • Philosophy: Perhaps best remembered for her love affair with Abelard, Heloise made her own mark on the world through her writings on philosophy and religion.
  • Medicine: The German Benedictine abbess Hildegard revolutionized the medical field with her writings that blended the science of the day with more traditionally feminine knowledge of herbs and food.

The contributions of women to intellectual fields like literature and science, as well as the power they wielded through religion, rebellions, and dynasties, have been invaluable. But even those who left only personal writings like diaries and letters, or whose stories became footnotes in larger struggles, have given us astonishing resources to understand the world they lived in and how history is made every day. With her great passion for these stories and their importance in our collective history, Professor Salisbury will show you contributions great and small, ordinary and astonishing. You will see how many of these women never intended to do more than live their lives in peaceful obscurity, while others wanted to—and often did—change the world.

In unearthing these stories, we are not only able to rediscover the contributions of women— often lost to time and whose stories were written to fit prevailing prejudices—but we are also able to see our own history in new, more nuanced ways. Beyond battles and dates and the names of great men, there are other stories that can give us a richer understanding of the past and how it has shaped the world we live in today.

Warriors, Queens, and Intellectuals: 36 Great Women before 1400 [TTC Video]

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