The Science of Natural Healing [TTC Video]

The Science of Natural Healing [TTC Video]
The Science of Natural Healing [TTC Video] by Professor Mimi Guarneri
Course No 1986 | MP4, MPEG4, 846 kbps, 426x320 | English, AAC, 96 kbps, 2 Ch | 24x30 mins | 4.69 GB

In the 21st century, the Western paradigm for healthcare is changing. Notwithstanding the great strengths of medical science, many people now have concerns about key features of our health-care system—among them, the widespread use of medical drugs and a relative deemphasis on preventive care.

But traditional Western medicine is not the only healing system rooted in science. Medical systems from other cultures, including those of India and China, have used natural treatments for centuries, some of which are now directly influencing our own health-care professions. These approaches not only emphasize healing with natural substances, but devote considerable attention to illness prevention and healthful living by considering the whole person rather than just targeting a condition.

What is the most effective way to nurture your own optimal health? Are there sound alternatives to the drugs so common in our health-care system, which can carry unwanted consequences and side effects? What about the range of natural methods, such as herbal medications, micronutrients, and the use of food itself as medicine? Are these approaches valid? And, if so, can we integrate the best of Western medicine with the best natural treatments to enjoy prime health and longevity?

In The Science of Natural Healing, board-certified cardiologist Dr. Mimi Guarneri, founder of the Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine, leads you in a compelling and practical exploration of holistic approaches to healthcare, introducing you to the many nature-based treatments and methods that are both clinically proven and readily available to you. In 24 incisive and revealing lectures, you look deeply into the science behind natural treatments and preventive healthcare, including how medical conditions ranging from high blood pressure to heart disease and diabetes can be treated naturally with remarkable effectiveness.

You also discover, perhaps surprisingly, that a large number of ailments and illnesses that we usually accept as part of life are in fact directly linked to lifestyle factors—and that positive changes in lifestyle, diet, and physical activity can have a major effect in both preventing and treating illness.

By probing the underlying causes for common medical conditions such as inflammation, high cholesterol, arthritis, and migraines, and the range of natural ways to treat them—including the use of improved nutrition, plant substances, supplements, and stress-reduction techniques—The Science of Natural Healing leaves you with a rich spectrum of choices and possibilities for your own healthcare, as well as practical tools for creating a truly healthful lifestyle.

Healing the Whole Human Being

As a guiding context for your study of natural healing, you learn about a new paradigm for healthcare, as embodied in the field of integrative holistic medicine. (“Holistic” simply means “whole.”) Integrative holistic medicine takes a large view, focusing on the whole person—aiming to prevent and treat illness through a full-spectrum approach that looks deeply at the factors of your genetic makeup, environment, lifestyle, nutrition, physical activity, and psychology.

Integrative holistic medicine is thoroughly grounded in traditional Western medical practice but also incorporates the use of proven natural substances and healing methods, looking for the underlying causes of illness and dedicated to caring for body, mind, and spirit.

The Promise of Nature-Based Healthcare

In this far-ranging inquiry, you delve into core subjects such as these:

  • The power of food in healing: By studying fundamental principles of nutrition, food sensitivity, and the impact of foods on the genome, discover the remarkable ways in which you can both prevent and treat numerous illnesses by what you eat.
  • Micronutrients and natural supplements: Investigate the healing properties of natural substances, including probiotics, selenium, and the hormone vitamin D, and their effectiveness in treating and preventing ulcerative colitis, diarrhea, and cancer.
  • Clinically proven herbal medicines: Study the medicinal uses of aloe, ginger, and licorice for the GI tract, cranberry and saw palmetto for urogenital conditions, and herbal treatments for migraines.
  • Natural treatments for common medical conditions: Apply the integrative treatment model and its many tools to specific conditions, including inflammation, cholesterol abnormalities, high blood pressure, and diabetes.
  • The mind-body connection in healing:

    Review substantial research on the mind’s effect on the body, including an in-depth study of stress, and learn about the use of guided imagery, yoga, meditation, and other mind-body modalities to treat physical illness.
  • Natural approaches to mental and spiritual health: Explore eye-opening data ranging from the effects of micronutrients and herbs on depression to studies showing the correlation between spiritual practices and longevity. Learn practical techniques for deepening an affirmative mental outlook and feeling state.

Teaching of Rare Scope and Vision

Revealing both an extraordinary depth of knowledge and a passionate investigative spirit, Dr. Guarneri points you to numerous empowering avenues and alternatives for healthful living. You study the many benefits of the Mediterranean diet and how to choose specific foods for your own optimal health. You observe the critical importance of exercise in both illness prevention and treatment, and you learn a range of methods (including the use of your own breathing) to disarm stress and deepen the experience of well-being.

Dr. Guarneri enlivens these lectures with unusual and often astonishing facts and stories, inviting you to challenge common assumptions and habitual thinking about health. You learn that

  • 75 to 90 percent of all visits to health-care providers result from stress-related disorders;
  • plant substances such as garlic and wakame seaweed substantially reduce systolic blood pressure; and
  • debilitating conditions such as arthritis and migraines can be triggered by simple sensitivity to foods.

In a penetrating exploration of the mind-body connection, Dr. Guarneri makes it clear that the health of the body is intimately related to the health of the mind and spirit.

  • You review hard-nosed research demonstrating the role of healthy relationships in positive health outcomes.
  • You learn why chronic anger increases the risk of heart attack by 230 percent.
  • You track the medical consequences of depression and hopelessness, and studies linking positive emotions and strong social bonds to markedly lower incidence of illness.

You’ll also see the integrative paradigm in action in real-life case studies, including the profile of a woman with diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis, and depression. Then, observe how an integrative treatment plan for her includes dietary changes, specific micronutrients, exercise, stress-reduction techniques, and renewed social connection.

In presenting the case studies, Dr. Guarneri demonstrates, with great compassion and discernment, how the integrative physician can guide patients through the emotional challenges of difficult illness and recovery so that they retain their spirit and identity.

Your Health: A New Possibility

No matter what kind of life you’re living, optimal health is one of the greatest assets you can have. In The Science of Natural Healing, Dr. Guarneri offers you the opportunity to take a highly proactive and informed role in your own healthcare—to make use of the best of nature-based medicine, to live a truly nurturing lifestyle, and to care for your own well-being in the most comprehensive and far-reaching way. In speaking deeply to a truly integrative approach to healing, these lectures can make a profound difference in your health now and in the future and help you live your life to the absolute fullest.

Lectures:

  1. Shifting the Health-Care Paradigm
  2. Understanding Holistic Integrative Medicine
  3. You Are More Than Your Genes
  4. Food Matters
  5. Not All Foods Are Created Equal
  6. Natural Approaches to Inflammation
  7. Food Sensitivity and the Elimination Diet
  8. Vitamins and Supplements
  9. Herbal Remedies
  10. Lowering Cholesterol Naturally
  11. Treating High Blood Pressure Naturally
  12. Treating Diabetes Naturally
  13. Stress and the Mind-Body Connection
  14. Turning Stress into Strength
  15. Meditation, Yoga, and Guided Imagery
  16. Natural Approaches to Mental Health
  17. Biofield Therapies
  18. The Power of Love
  19. Spirituality in Health
  20. Components of Spiritual Wellness
  21. Applying the Lessons of Natural Healing
  22. Ecology and Health
  23. Healthy People, Healthy Planet
  24. You Are Your Own Best Medicine

Origins and Ideologies of the American Revolution [TTC Video]

Origins and Ideologies of the American Revolution [TTC Video]
Origins and Ideologies of the American Revolution [TTC Video] by Professor Peter C Mancall
Course No 8520 | MKV, x264, 784 kbps, 960x720 | English, AAC, 96 kbps, 2 Ch | 48x30 mins | 9.64GB

The years 1760–1800 rocked the Western world. These were the years when colonists on the eastern fringes of a continent converted Enlightenment thought first into action, then into government. Astonishing the world leaders of the day, they defied and broke away from their mother country, and then fashioned a republic capable of sustaining itself generation after generation.

Why this happened and how the colonists did it is the subject of Professor Peter C. Mancall's 48 lectures. It is a story of immense importance and rich discoveries.

The American Revolution began when British colonists first questioned the intrusions of Great Britain into their economic progress and civil lives. It erupted into armed conflict in 1775, but it did not end with the peace treaty of 1783. The Americans had yet to craft a government that brought into being new ways for citizens to relate to their government and for a government to relate to its nation.

Watch the Rise of Representative Government

Presenting this momentous period is Professor Mancall, professor of history and anthropology at the University of Southern California. Throughout this course Professor Mancall does far more than recount events. He illuminates the words of the very people who struggled with the crosscurrents of those times. Professor Mancall brings to life both the famous and little-remembered colonists who were caught up in the debates over rights and power, liberties and empire. Because he presents original source materials as well as how events were reported and interpreted, we more readily understand the evolution of ideas, the competing pressures, and the misunderstandings.

Professor Mancall lays the foundation of the story by elucidating the roots of English colonization and the successes of the colonies, then introducing the explosive matter of who was to pay for the French and Indian War of 1754–63. He reads from the fiery 1760s arguments of the Boston lawyer James Otis, who wrote, "The very act of taxing exercised over those who are not represented appears to me to be depriving them of one of their most essential rights as freemen."

He reads from the reasoned pamphlets of John Dickinson, who worried "whether Parliament can legally take money out of our pockets without our consent. If they can, our boast of liberty is but ... a sound." He brings us into the life and views of the brilliant Bostonian Mercy Otis Warren, who fashioned one of the first histories of the American Revolution from her own observations.

And of course, he brings us closer to the extraordinary minds leading the colonies throughout the political tumult, including Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton.

In Professor Mancall's lectures you learn the British side as well. You'll hear the opinions of loyalist Massachusetts Governor Thomas Hutchinson. And you'll hear the words of King George III, who declared himself "still hoping that my people in America would have discerned the traitorous views of their leaders and have been convinced that to be a subject of Great Britain, with all its consequences, is to be the freest member of any civil society in the known world."

Professor Mancall shines when revealing how ideas were formed in the minds of those affected by events, and how their ideas inspired so much that is familiar to us today.

Independence Was Just the Beginning

In achieving freedom from Great Britain, the colonists traded one set of problems for another. No country the size of the United States had ever successfully established a republic. Indeed, in the 1780s, the young nation could not pay its debts or craft an effective foreign policy. European monarchies expected imminent collapse. Instead, 55 men wrote a constitution for a national government, then asked for approval from the people. Debate raged, but owing to a pledge to add a list of guaranteed liberties, the United States Constitution became the nation's supreme law.

Still, no one knew whether the new governmental structure would work. It seemed to be an untried collection of compromises, checks, and balances. But the new country began auspiciously, led by the most revered American of the age, George Washington.

With Washington's voluntary exit from the political stage in 1796, political leadership fell to two Revolutionary comrades who developed different views for the young country's proper course. John Adams was devoted to a strong national government—Thomas Jefferson to individual liberties. Each was backed by passionate followers and believed he was working for the principles of 1775–76.

In the end, what may have done most to save the country from catastrophic failure was that Adams, though discouraged and angry after losing in a free election, passed power peaceably to Jefferson who, rather than seek political revenge, carried on much of what had been built up since the Constitution's inception.

The Meaning of the Revolution

The American Revolution was one of the great turning points in Western civilization. Anglo-American colonists, long loyal to the British monarch, thought that governments were meant to serve people rather than the other way around, and they struggled to establish such a government for themselves. They also struggled among themselves over how that government would relate to citizens and to their respective states, and how the government would be both powerful enough to do good for the people yet not so powerful as to abuse natural liberties.

Professor Mancall delves into all this. His course contains separate lectures on how the Revolution affected women, Native Americans, African Americans, and the balance of rich and poor. As Professor Mancall notes, the words, "All men are created equal" set in motion ideas and movements that went beyond the simple thought that a colonist is the equal of a Briton; they kindled a flame that began to light the world.

Why the Revolution Worked

As Professor Mancall makes clear, the success of the Revolution was never assured. The leading resistors were fallible men, and the current of events so swirled about them that it could easily have swept them aside. Yet the Revolution of 1760–1800 did work.

One reason was effective patriot propaganda. Paul Revere deftly crafted an illustration of the Boston Massacre that inflamed Americans against British soldiers. Thomas Paine brilliantly expressed the rationale for independence in his pamphlet Common Sense.

Another reason for American success was the flawed strategy and tactics of the British. During 1776 to 1778, British and Hessian soldiers so plundered families that Americans resolved the more firmly to separate from Britain. Even in the South where slaveholders might have worried over the "equality" language of the Declaration, the British discovered most Americans thought of themselves as American rather than British.

Then the Americans realized they needed a new constitution and wrote one so well that it has remained virtually intact after 220 years.

The election of 1800 placed a capstone on the success of the Revolution. Against a backdrop a French Revolution sinking into military dictatorship, Adams stepped aside. Jefferson understood the significance of the moment and asserted that despite political differences of party, nothing was more important than the continuation of the Revolutionary ideas of liberty, citizens' rights, and responsible self-government.

Lectures:

  1. Self-Evident Truths
  2. Ideas and Ideologies
  3. Europeans of Colonial America
  4. Natives and Slaves of Colonial America
  5. The Colonies in the Atlantic World, c. 1750
  6. The Seven Years' War
  7. The British Constitution
  8. George III and the Politics of Empire
  9. Politics in British America before 1760
  10. James Otis and the Writs of Assistance Case
  11. The Search for Order and Revenue
  12. The Stamp Act and Rebellion in the Streets
  13. Parliament Digs in Its Heels, 1766–1767
  14. The Crisis of Representation
  15. The Logic of Loyalty and Resistance
  16. Franklin and the Search for Reconciliation
  17. The Boston Massacre
  18. The British Empire and the Tea Act
  19. The Boston Tea Party and the Coercive Acts
  20. The First Continental Congress
  21. Lexington and Concord
  22. Second Continental Congress and Bunker Hill
  23. Thomas Paine and Common Sense
  24. The British Seizure of New York
  25. The Declaration of Independence
  26. The War for New York and New Jersey
  27. Saratoga, Philadelphia, and Valley Forge
  28. The Creation of State Constitutions
  29. Jefferson's Statute for Religious Freedom
  30. Franklin, Paris, and the French Alliance
  31. The Articles of Confederation
  32. Yorktown and the End of the War
  33. The Treaty of Paris of 1783
  34. The Crises of the 1780s
  35. African Americans and the Revolution
  36. The Constitutional Convention
  37. The United States Constitution
  38. The Antifederalist Critique
  39. The Federalists' Response
  40. The Bill of Rights
  41. Politics in the 1790s
  42. The Alien and Sedition Acts
  43. The Election of 1800
  44. Women and the American Revolution
  45. The Revolution and Native Americans
  46. The American Revolution as Social Movement
  47. Reflections by the Revolutionary Generation
  48. The Meaning of the Revolution

Mr. Lincoln: The Life of Abraham Lincoln [TTC Video]

Mr. Lincoln: The Life of Abraham Lincoln [TTC Video]
Mr Lincoln: The Life of Abraham Lincoln [TTC Video] by Professor Allen C Guelzo
Course No 8561 | AVI, H264, 700 kbps, 640x480 | English, MP3, 128 kbps | 12x30 mins | + PDF Guidebook | 2.2GB

John Locke Scripps, who had convinced Lincoln to write his first campaign autobiography, asserted that the 16th president had become "the Great American Man—the grand central figure in American (perhaps the World's) History." Historians still find it hard to quibble with this opinion of Lincoln's place in the story of America. Lincoln was the central figure in the nation's greatest crisis, the Civil War. His achievements in office make as good a case as any that he was the greatest president in U.S. history.

What made Lincoln great? What was it about him that struck those who knew him? This course explores those questions with the help of an authority who, in his own words, has "spent many years trying to get to know this man from afar," and in doing so has become one of the country's most distinguished Lincoln scholars and an award-winning author for his books about Lincoln.

Professor Allen C. Guelzo will lead you on "a great adventure," a tour of Lincoln's life, from his forebears' arrival in America through an evaluation of how his legacy lives on for us today. You will come to know Lincoln through the eyes of those who knew, lived with, and worked with him.

For Lincoln buffs and those simply wishing to know him much better, this course opens a compelling view into his thinking and career.

In addition to asking what it was like to know Lincoln, Professor Guelzo explores three themes:

  • What ideas were at the core of his understanding of American politics?
  • Why did he oppose slavery, and what propelled him, in the 1850s, into the open opposition to slavery that led to his election to the presidency in 1860?
  • What particular gifts equipped Lincoln to lead the nation through the "fiery trial" of the Civil War?

Lincoln as Man and President

"Just think of such a sucker as me as President."
—Abraham Lincoln, commenting to a newspaper editor on his presidential chances

With Professor Guelzo, you will explore Lincoln's pre-presidential life for clues to his most significant personality traits. You will find a man who possessed perhaps the most complex inner life of any American public figure. You will meet a Lincoln who:

  • Was an unusual combination of both introvert and extrovert.
  • Never joined a church, professed no formal religion, and was even known to have been critical of Christianity before he entered politics. Yet he may have been more moral, ethical, and "Christian" than any other U.S. president.
  • Held a profoundly fatalistic view of life, rooted in the Calvinist teaching of his youth, that human will was essentially nothing, and everything was predestined by an immensely powerful God.
  • However, Lincoln was anything but passive in life. Largely self-taught, he was a quietly confident man who, regardless of the task—learning to be a surveyor, a lawyer, or President of the United States—"went at it with good earnest."

This aspect of the course will enable you to connect Lincoln the man with Lincoln the president. How was it that someone with limited prior political experience and no administrative background, who was considered homely, unsophisticated, and self-deprecating, could have achieved such monumental success as the nation's chief executive?

In fact, as you will see, "folksy" Abraham Lincoln was about nothing if not ambition: his own personal burning ambition ("a little engine that knew no rest," his law partner described it) and his firm conviction that the unfettered opportunity to fulfill one's ambitions—"that every man can make himself"—was what made America great.

A House Divided

"A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free... It will become all one thing, or all the other."
—acceptance speech as 1858 Republican nominee for U.S. Senate from Illinois

Professor Guelzo does a remarkable job of shedding light on Lincoln's relationship to the issue that defined his presidency and place in history: slavery.

You will trace the circumstances that spurred Lincoln, in the 1850s, to join the Republican Party and take the stand on slavery that won him prominence as a national politician. These events include the repeal of the Missouri Compromise and the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision, and Lincoln's famous debates with Illinois Senator Stephen A. Douglas.

As part of this discussion, Professor Guelzo covers an aspect of Lincoln's opposition to slavery that is not always emphasized: his pro-business, free-market philosophy. As a Whig Party member of the Illinois legislature, Lincoln had favored projects—the creation of a state bank, sale of public lands, transportation improvements—that promoted business and economic development.

In the 1850s, political and economic trends made it clear that slavery, far from slowly dying out as the Founding Fathers had anticipated, was poised to expand to new U.S. states and territories. This alarmed Lincoln, who viewed an expanding supply of inexpensive slave labor as a dire threat to the survival of the free market.

"The Work We Are In"

"With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan."
—Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address

Lincoln transformed himself from an insecure manager into a confident and competent chief executive. "The old man sits here and wields like a backwoods Jupiter the bolts of war and the machinery of government with a hand equally steady and firm," marveled Lincoln's young secretary, John Hay.

You will consider Lincoln's skill in directing not only the war against the Confederacy, but in dealing with difficult members of his own federal government, including General George McClellan, Secretary of State William Seward, and Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase—each of whom thought he could run the government better than Lincoln—and Supreme Court Justice Roger B. Taney, who tried to issue legal decisions to cripple Lincoln's war effort.

Among the most memorable parts of this course are those in which Professor Guelzo examines Lincoln's nearly unrivaled powers as a writer and communicator. Only Thomas Jefferson spoke and wrote as eloquently and persuasively about American democracy as Lincoln.

The "Great American Man"

"We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."
—Conclusion to the Gettysburg Address

This course is an absorbing opportunity to increase your knowledge of a man whose words and life embodied the nature of democracy.

Abraham Lincoln understood and envisioned the U.S. as a nation of self-governing equals who were wise enough to be guided not just by self-interest or popular enthusiasm, but by an abiding sense of right and wrong. Ultimately, he gave that nation, in his words, "a new birth of freedom."

Lectures:

  1. Young Man Lincoln
  2. Whig Meteor
  3. Lincoln, Law, and Politics
  4. The Mind of Abraham Lincoln
  5. Lincoln and Slavery
  6. The Great Debates
  7. Lincoln and Liberty, Too
  8. The Uncertain President
  9. The Emancipation Moment
  10. Lincoln’s Triumph
  11. The President’s Sword
  12. The Dream of Lincoln
pages: 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118
*100: 100