How to Disappear

How to Disappear

How to Disappear: Erase Your Digital Footprint, Leave False Trails, and Vanish without a Trace by Frank M Ahearn, Eileen C Horan
2010 | EPUB | 159.65KB

Frank M. Ahearn built his first career by finding people who didn’t want to be found—from philandering celebrities to a certain White House intern (Monica Lewinsky) before anybody had heard of her, as well as countless cheaters, frauds, and bad guys. Using the “skip tracer” techniques he developed in the process, Ahearn embarked on a second career counseling those who wanted not to be found. If you’ve ever fantasized about disappearing—literally dropping out of sight or just eliminating the traceable evidence of your existence—How to Disappear is your guide.

In a world-wise, straight-talking, wryly humorous narrative, Ahearn provides field-tested tips, tools, and techniques for maintaining privacy, as well as strategies for protecting personal information and preventing identity theft. You’ll learn key tactics such as misinformation (destroying all the data known about you), disinformation (creating fake trails), and reformation (getting where you want to be without leaving clues). Throughout, Ahearn shares real-life stories of his fascinating career—from nabbing adulterous celebrities to helping abuse victims find safety.

An indispensable resource not just for those determined to be anonymous, but for almost anyone in the brave new world of online information, How to Disappear sums up Ahearn’s dual philosophy: Don’t break the law, but know how to protect yourself.

The Tinkerers

The Tinkerers

The Tinkerers: The Amateurs, DIYers, and Inventors Who Make America Great by Alec Foege
2013 | EPUB | 316.91KB

From its earliest years, the United States was a nation of tinkerers: men and women who looked at the world around them and were able to create something genuinely new from what they saw. Guided by their innate curiosity, a desire to know how things work, and a belief that anything can be improved, amateurs and professionals from Benjamin Franklin to Thomas Edison came up with the inventions that laid the foundations for America’s economic dominance. Recently, Americans have come to question whether our tinkering spirit has survived the pressures of ruthless corporate organization and bottom-line driven caution. But as Alec Foege shows in The Tinkerers, reports of tinkering’s death have been greatly exaggerated.

Through the stories of great tinkerers and inventions past and present, Foege documents how Franklin and Edison’s modern-day heirs do not allow our cultural obsessions with efficiency and conformity to interfere with their passion and creativity. Tinkering has been the guiding force behind both major corporate-sponsored innovations such as the personal computer and Ethernet, and smaller scale inventions with great potential, such as a machine that can make low-cost eyeglass lenses for people in impoverished countries and a device that uses lasers to shoot malarial mosquitoes out of the sky. Some tinkerers attended the finest engineering schools in the world; some had no formal training in their chosen fields. Some see themselves as solo artists; others emphasize the importance of working in teams. What binds them together is an ability to subvert the old order, to see fresh potential in existing technologies, and to apply technical know-how to the problems of their day.

As anyone who has feared voiding a warranty knows, the complexity of modern systems can be needlessly intimidating. Despite this, tinkerers can – and do – come from anywhere, whether it’s the R&D lab of a major corporation, a hobbyist’s garage, or a summer camp for budding engineers. Through a lively retelling of recent history and captivating interviews with today’s most creative innovators, Foege reveals how the tinkering tradition remains, in new and unexpected forms, at the heart of American society and culture.

Remembering Satan: A Tragic Case of Recovered Memory

Remembering Satan: A Tragic Case of Recovered Memory

Remembering Satan: A Tragic Case of Recovered Memory by Lawrence Wright
2011 | EPUB | 1.8MB

In 1988 Ericka and Julie Ingram began making a series of accusations of sexual abuse against their father, Paul Ingram, who was a respected deputy sheriff in Olympia, Washington. At first the accusations were confined to molestations in their childhood, but they grew to include torture and rape as recently as the month before. At a time when reported incidents of "recovered memories" had become widespread, these accusations were not unusual. What captured national attention in this case is that, under questioning, Ingram appeared to remember participating in bizarre satanic rites involving his whole family and other members of the sheriff's department.

Remembering Satan is a lucid, measured, yet absolutely riveting inquest into a case that destroyed a family, engulfed a small town, and captivated an America obsessed by rumors of a satanic underground. As it follows the increasingly bizarre accusations and confessions, the claims and counterclaims of police, FBI investigators, and mental health professionals. Remembering Satan gives us what is at once a psychological detective story and a domestic tragedy about what happens when modern science is subsumed by our most archaic fears.

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