The Flooded Earth: Our Future In a World Without Ice Caps [EPUB]

The Flooded Earth: Our Future In a World Without Ice Caps [EPUB]
The Flooded Earth: Our Future In a World Without Ice Caps by Peter D Ward
2010 | EPUB | 0.7MB

Sea level rise will happen no matter what we do. Even if we stopped all carbon dioxide emissions today, the seas would rise one meter by 2050 and three meters by 2100. This—not drought, species extinction, or excessive heat waves—will be the most catastrophic effect of global warming. And it won’t simply redraw our coastlines—agriculture, electrical and fiber optic systems, and shipping will be changed forever. As icebound regions melt, new sources of oil, gas, minerals, and arable land will be revealed, as will fierce geopolitical battles over who owns the rights to them.

In The Flooded Earth, species extinction expert Peter Ward describes in intricate detail what our world will look like in 2050, 2100, 2300, and beyond—a blueprint for a foreseeable future. Ward also explains what politicians and policymakers around the world should be doing now to head off the worst consequences of an inevitable transformation.

Crusoe, the Celebrity Dachshund: Adventures of the Wiener Dog Extraordinaire [EPUB]

Crusoe, the Celebrity Dachshund: Adventures of the Wiener Dog Extraordinaire [EPUB]
Crusoe, the Celebrity Dachshund: Adventures of the Wiener Dog Extraordinaire by Ryan Beauchesne
2015 | EPUB | 56.3MB

What?! You've never heard of Crusoe the Celebrity Dachshund?! You must be living under a rock!

... Or at least that's what Crusoe thinks. He's the self-proclaimed "wiener dog who thinks he's more of a celebrity than he really is." (until now!) Crusoe is the star of his wildly popular blog of the same name, winner of the 2013 and 2014 Best Pet Blog Award. That's right... two years in a row! Because Crusoe is a talented and ridiculously photogenic miniature dachshund with a big personality, stunning fashion sense, and an insatiable penchant for whimsy. Perhaps you know him better by his infamous alter ego, BATDOG? We thought so.

This is Crusoe's New York Times bestselling book debut, and he's so excited to share it with all of his adoring fans. Now everyone can stare lovingly into his big brown eyes and admire his wit and many costumes any time they choose. Crusoe is certain that his book, featuring hundreds of photos, will make the perfect gift for dog-lovers of all ages. He wants to be accessible to his fans so you can really get to know the mutt behind the mask, the pooch behind that signature sexy pout, the pup with a heart of gold.

Don't miss these amazing photos and stories:

  • The adventures of BATDOG and Robin;
  • Cooking with Crusoe;
  • Dr. Crusoe, the dentist, and malpractice;
  • International travels with the worldliest of adventure dogs;
  • Fishing with Crusoe and twin brother Oakley;
  • Dating advice from the studly pup himself;
  • Walking in a winter wienerland;

...And many more!

The Wild and the Wicked: On Nature and Human Nature [EPUB]

The Wild and the Wicked: On Nature and Human Nature [EPUB]
The Wild and the Wicked: On Nature and Human Nature by Benjamin Hale
2017 | EPUB | 1.05MB

Most of us think that in order to be environmentalists, we have to love nature. Essentially, we should be tree huggers—embracing majestic redwoods, mighty oaks, graceful birches, etc. We ought to eat granola, drive hybrids, cook tofu, and write our appointments in Sierra Club calendars. Nature’s splendor, in other words, justifies our protection of it. But, asks Benjamin Hale in this provocative book, what about tsunamis, earthquakes, cancer, bird flu, killer asteroids? They are nature, too.

For years, environmentalists have insisted that nature is fundamentally good. In The Wild and the Wicked, Benjamin Hale adopts the opposite position—that much of the time nature can be bad—in order to show that even if nature is cruel, we still need to be environmentally conscientious. Hale argues that environmentalists needn’t feel compelled to defend the value of nature, or even to adopt the attitudes of tree-hugging nature lovers. We can acknowledge nature’s indifference and periodic hostility. Deftly weaving anecdote and philosophy, he shows that we don’t need to love nature to be green. What really ought to be driving our environmentalism is our humanity, not nature’s value.

Hale argues that our unique burden as human beings is that we can act for reasons, good or bad. He claims that we should be environmentalists because environmentalism is right, because we humans have the capacity to be better than nature. As humans, we fail to live up to our moral potential if we act as brutally as nature. Hale argues that despite nature’s indifference to the plight of humanity, humanity cannot be indifferent to the plight of nature.

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