Bitter Victory: The Battle for Sicily, 1943

Bitter Victory: The Battle for Sicily, 1943

Bitter Victory: The Battle for Sicily, 1943 by Carlo D'Este
HarperPerennial | 2008 | ISBN: 0060576502 | EPUB | 18.75MB


Bitter Victory illuminates a chapter of World War II that has lacked a balanced, full-scale treatment until now. In recounting the second-largest amphibious operation in military history, Carlo D'Este for the first time reveals the conflicts in planning and the behind-the-scenes quarrels between top Allied commanders. The book explodes the myth of the Patton-Montgomery rivalry and exposes how Alexander's inept generalship nearly wrecked the campaign. D'Este documents in chilling detail the series of savage battles fought against an overmatched but brilliant foe and how the Germans—against overwhelming odds—carried out one of the greatest strategic withdrawals in history. His controversial narrative depicts for the first time how the Allies bungled their attempt to cut off the Axis retreat from Sicily, turning what ought to have been a great triumph into a bitter victory that later came to haunt the Allies in Italy.


Using a wealth of original sources, D'Este paints an unforgettable portrait of men at war. From the front lines to the councils of the Axis and Allied high commands, Bitter Victory offers penetrating reassessments of the men who masterminded the campaign. Thrilling and authoritative, this is military history on an epic scale.


Amerigo: The Man Who Gave His Name to America

Amerigo: The Man Who Gave His Name to America

Amerigo: The Man Who Gave His Name to America by Felipe Fernández-Armesto
Key Porter Books | 2007 | ISBN: 1552638928 | EPUB | 3.76MB


In 1507, the cartographer Martin Waldseemuller published a world map with a new continent on it which he called "America," after the explorer and navigator Amerigo Vespucci. The map was a phenomenal success and when Mercator`s 1538 world map extended the name to the northern hemisphere of the continent, the new name was secure. But Waldseemuller soon realized he had picked the wrong man.


This is the story of how one side of the world came to be named not after its discoverer Christopher Columbus, but after his friend and rival Amerigo Vespucci. Born in Florence in 1454, Vespucci had spent his youth as a dealer or agent for the great Medici family. Then in 1491, he followed his fellow Italian Columbus to Seville. In Seville, Vespucci continued as a Florentine agent, but also helped Columbus get his ships ready for his second and third voyages. Although Amerigo himself later sailed on at least two voyages of his own and explored the coast of present-day Brazil, he excelled above all at self-invention and self-promotion. He saw himself as an explorer and navigator of genius, and his colourful travel writings sold much better than those of Columbus. He became Pilot Major of Spain in 1508 and died in 1512.


Felipe Fernandez-Armesto brings this adventurous period in world history to life with vivid descriptions of the people and events that shaped North America.


The Genius in the Design

The Genius in the Design

The Genius in the Design: Bernini, Borromini, and the Rivalry That Transformed Rome by Jake Morrissey
HarperPerennial | 2006 | ISBN: 0060525347 | EPUB | 336.76KB


The rivalry between the brilliant seventeenth-century Italian architects Gianlorenzo Bernini and Francesco Borromini is the stuff of legend. Enormously talented and ambitious artists, they met as contemporaries in the building yards of St. Peter's in Rome, became the greatest architects of their era by designing some of the most beautiful buildings in the world, and ended their lives as bitter enemies. Engrossing and impeccably researched, full of dramatic tension and breathtaking insight, The Genius in the Design is the remarkable tale of how two extraordinary visionaries schemed and maneuvered to get the better of each other and, in the process, created the spectacular Roman cityscape of today.