The American Crisis

The American Crisis

The American Crisis by Thomas Paine
Barnes & Noble | 2010 | ISBN: 143512703X | EPUB | 1.71MB
“These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands for it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.” — The American Crisis December 23, 1776

The pen of Thomas Paine was one of the most powerful weapons Americans possessed in their struggle for independence. The American Crisis played a key role in persuading ordinary people to embrace the American Revolution and to remain true to that cause. The pamphlets comprising this volume bluntly denounced Great Britain’s constitution, its monarchy, and its empire and reminded citizens why they were undertaking such an arduous struggle. Our political rhetoric and indeed our political culture still show the imprint of Paine’s galvanizing words.

Triumvirate: The Story of the Unlikely Alliance

Triumvirate: The Story of the Unlikely Alliance

Triumvirate: The Story of the Unlikely Alliance That Saved the Constitution and United the Nation by Bruce Chadwick
Sourcebooks | 2010 | ISBN: 1402239327 | EPUB | 2.25MB

Facing a crumbling union and inevitable anarchy, three men form an unlikely alliance...

When the smoke cleared from Revolutionary War battlefields, independent minded Americans turned against each other. Faced with a sagging economy, a weak central government, and citizens still reeling from British rule, three bold young men could shape a great nation of the chaos-but first they'd have to learn to work together.

July 1914: Countdown to War

July 1914: Countdown to War

July 1914: Countdown to War by Sean McMeekin
Basic Books | 2013 | ISBN: 0465031455 | EPUB | 3.57MB

When a Serbian-backed assassin gunned down Archduke Franz Ferdinand in late June 1914, the world seemed unmoved. Even Ferdinand’s own uncle, Franz Josef I, was notably ambivalent about the death of the Hapsburg heir, saying simply, “It is God’s will.” Certainly, there was nothing to suggest that the episode would lead to conflict—much less a world war of such massive and horrific proportions that it would fundamentally reshape the course of human events.

As acclaimed historian Sean McMeekin reveals in July 1914, World War I might have been avoided entirely had it not been for a small group of statesmen who, in the month after the assassination, plotted to use Ferdinand’s murder as the trigger for a long-awaited showdown in Europe. The primary culprits, moreover, have long escaped blame. While most accounts of the war’s outbreak place the bulk of responsibility on German and Austro-Hungarian militarism, McMeekin draws on surprising new evidence from archives across Europe to show that the worst offenders were actually to be found in Russia and France, whose belligerence and duplicity ensured that war was inevitable.

Whether they plotted for war or rode the whirlwind nearly blind, each of the men involved—from Austrian Foreign Minister Leopold von Berchtold and German Chancellor Bethmann Hollweg to Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Sazonov and French president Raymond Poincaré—sought to capitalize on the fallout from Ferdinand’s murder, unwittingly leading Europe toward the greatest cataclysm it had ever seen.

A revolutionary account of the genesis of World War I, July 1914 tells the gripping story of Europe’s countdown to war from the bloody opening act on June 28th to Britain’s final plunge on August 4th, showing how a single month—and a handful of men—changed the course of the twentieth century.

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