The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West [EPUB]

The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West [EPUB]
The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West by Peter Cozzens
2016 | EPUB | 81.54MB

Bringing together a pageant of fascinating characters including Custer, Sherman, Grant, and a host of other military and political figures, as well as great native leaders such as Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, and Red Cloud, The Earth is Weeping—lauded by Booklist as “a beautifully written work of understanding and compassion”—is the fullest account to date of how the West was won…and lost.

"Peter Cozzens’s The Earth is Weeping sets a new standard for Western Indian Wars history..." —Stuart Rosebrook, True West Magazine

With the end of the Civil War, the nation recommenced its expansion onto traditional Indian tribal lands, setting off a wide-ranging conflict that would last more than three decades. In an exploration of the wars and negotiations that destroyed tribal ways of life even as they made possible the emergence of the modern United States, Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the encroachment experienced by the tribes and the tribal conflicts over whether to fight or make peace, and explores the squalid lives of soldiers posted to the frontier and the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies.

Dictatorship by Carl Schmitt [EPUB]

Dictatorship by Carl Schmitt [EPUB]
Dictatorship by Carl Schmitt
2014 | EPUB | 0.71MB

Now available in English for the first time, Dictatorship is Carl Schmitt’s most scholarly book and arguably a paradigm for his entire work.

Written shortly after the Russian Revolution and the First World War, Schmitt analyses the problem of the state of emergency and the power of the Reichspräsident in declaring it. Dictatorship, Schmitt argues, is a necessary legal institution in constitutional law and has been wrongly portrayed as just the arbitrary rule of a so-called dictator.

Dictatorship is an essential book for understanding the work of Carl Schmitt and a major contribution to the modern theory of a democratic, constitutional state. And despite being written in the early part of the twentieth century, it speaks with remarkable prescience to our contemporary political concerns.

The Lysenko Affair [EPUB]

The Lysenko Affair [EPUB]
The Lysenko Affair by David Joravsk
2010 | EPUB | 13.78MB

The Lysenko affair was perhaps the most bizarre chapter in the history of modern science. For thirty years, until 1965, Soviet genetics was dominated by a fanatical agronomist who achieved dictatorial power over genetics and plant science as well as agronomy.

"A standard source both for Soviet specialists and for sociologists of science."—American Journal of Sociology

"Joravsky has produced . . . the most detailed and authoritative treatment of Lysenko and his view on genetics."—New York Times Book Review

We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler [EPUB]

We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler [EPUB]
We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler by Russell Freedman
2016 | EPUB | 78.03MB

In his signature eloquent prose, backed up by thorough research, Russell Freedman tells the story of Austrian-born Hans Scholl and his sister Sophie. They belonged to Hitler Youth as young children, but began to doubt the Nazi regime. As older students, the Scholls and a few friends formed the White Rose, a campaign of active resistance to Hitler and the Nazis. Risking imprisonment or even execution, the White Rose members distributed leaflets urging Germans to defy the Nazi government. Their belief that freedom was worth dying for will inspire young readers to stand up for what they believe in.

Hitler's Compromises: Coercion and Consensus in Nazi Germany [EPUB]

Hitler's Compromises: Coercion and Consensus in Nazi Germany [EPUB]
Hitler's Compromises: Coercion and Consensus in Nazi Germany by Nathan Stoltzfus
2016 | EPUB | 3.6MB

History has focused on Hitler’s use of charisma and terror, asserting that the dictator made few concessions to maintain power. Nathan Stoltzfus, the award-winning author of Resistance of Heart: Intermarriage and the Rosenstrasse Protest in Germany, challenges this notion, assessing the surprisingly frequent tactical compromises Hitler made in order to preempt hostility and win the German people’s complete fealty.

As part of his strategy to secure a “1,000-year Reich,” Hitler sought to convince the German people to believe in Nazism so they would perpetuate it permanently and actively shun those who were out of step with society. When widespread public dissent occurred at home—which most often happened when policies conflicted with popular traditions or encroached on private life—Hitler made careful calculations and acted strategically to maintain his popular image. Extending from the 1920s to the regime’s collapse, this revealing history makes a powerful and original argument that will inspire a major rethinking of Hitler’s rule.

The Eichmann Trial [EPUB]

The Eichmann Trial [EPUB]
The Eichmann Trial by Deborah E Lipstadt
2011 | EPUB | 2.05MB

The capture of SS Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann by Israeli agents in Argentina in May of 1960 and his subsequent trial in Jerusalem by an Israeli court electrified the world. The public debate it sparked on where, how, and by whom Nazi war criminals should be brought to justice, and the international media coverage of the trial itself, was a watershed moment in how the civilized world in general and Holocaust survivors in particular found the means to deal with the legacy of genocide on a scale that had never been seen before.

Award-winning historian Deborah E. Lipstadt gives us an overview of the trial and analyzes the dramatic effect that the survivors’ courtroom testimony—which was itself not without controversy—had on a world that had until then regularly commemorated the Holocaust but never fully understood what the millions who died and the hundreds of thousands who managed to survive had actually experienced.

As the world continues to confront the ongoing reality of genocide and ponder the fate of those who survive it, this trial of the century, which has become a touchstone for judicial proceedings throughout the world, offers a legal, moral, and political framework for coming to terms with unfathomable evil. Lipstadt infuses a gripping narrative with historical perspective and contemporary urgency.

Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory [EPUB]

Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory [EPUB]
Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory by Deborah E Lipstadt
2012 | EPUB | 3.77MB

The denial of the Holocaust has no more credibility than the assertion that the earth is flat. Yet there are those who insist that the death of six million Jews in Nazi concentration camps is nothing but a hoax perpetrated by a powerful Zionist conspiracy. Sixty years ago, such notions were the province of pseudohistorians who argued that Hitler never meant to kill the Jews, and that only a few hundred thousand died in the camps from disease; they also argued that the Allied bombings of Dresden and other cities were worse than any Nazi offense, and that the Germans were the “true victims” of World War II.

For years, those who made such claims were dismissed as harmless cranks operating on the lunatic fringe. But as time goes on, they have begun to gain a hearing in respectable arenas, and now, in the first full-scale history of Holocaust denial, Deborah Lipstadt shows how—despite tens of thousands of living witnesses and vast amounts of documentary evidence—this irrational idea not only has continued to gain adherents but has become an international movement, with organized chapters, “independent” research centers, and official publications that promote a “revisionist” view of recent history.

Lipstadt shows how Holocaust denial thrives in the current atmosphere of value-relativism, and argues that this chilling attack on the factual record not only threatens Jews but undermines the very tenets of objective scholarship that support our faith in historical knowledge. Thus the movement has an unsuspected power to dramatically alter the way that truth and meaning are transmitted from one generation to another.

The Struggle For Europe [EPUB]

The Struggle For Europe [EPUB]
The Struggle For Europe by Chester Wilmot
2015 | EPUB | 26.77MB

Chester Wilmot's The Struggle for Europe is the most highly regarded single-volume history of the Second World War in Europe. First published in 1952, the book has the advantage of the author's extensive interviews with participants from all sides of the conflict, when recollections of the war were still painfully fresh.

The pattern of post-war Europe, he maintains, was determined during the fighting; he sees the shaping events through a study of wartime diplomacy and strategy and of the impact on wartime policies of the personalities of the statesmen and generals with whom the decisions lay.

Throughout Wilmot hews to one guiding principle: To concern ourselves solely with the course of military events would be to tell only half the story and to see only half its significance. It is the political outcome that counts, and in this book the two are closely related at every stage.

The History of Medicine: A Beginner's Guide [EPUB]

The History of Medicine: A Beginner's Guide [EPUB]
The History of Medicine: A Beginner's Guide by Mark Jackson
2014 | EPUB | 3.04MB

In a world burdened by chronic conditions and mutating viruses, with a health service strained to its limits, the history of medicine challenges our understanding of what it means to be healthy. By illuminating the ailments and methods of the past, our own dilemmas about medical practice and policy can be put into a new perspective. Esteemed historian Mark Jackson takes us from the dawn of medicine in the ancient world to the most recent developments pioneered in the 21st century’s hospitals. On the way, Jackson explores Indian and Chinese traditions, as well as the origins of today’s so-called alternative therapies, offering piercing insight into how medicine has reflected and shaped society throughout the ages.

The Crusades: A Beginner's Guide [EPUB]

The Crusades: A Beginner's Guide [EPUB]
The Crusades: A Beginner's Guide by Andrew Jotischky
2015 | EPUB | 5.81MB

In 1095 Pope Urban II launched the First Crusade to recover Jerusalem from the Seljuq Turks. Tens of thousands of people joined his cause, making it the single largest event of the Middle Ages. The conflict would rage for over 200 years, poisoning Christian and Islamic relations forever. In this new introduction to the Crusades, Andrew Jotischky takes readers through the key events, focusing on the experience of crusading, from both sides, and asking crucial questions. What were the motivations of the crusaders? What was it like to be a crusader or live in a crusading society? How do these events, nearly a thousand years ago, still shape the politics of today?

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