All-Out for Victory: Magazine Advertising and the World War II Home Front [PDF]

All-Out for Victory: Magazine Advertising and the World War II Home Front [PDF]
All-Out for Victory: Magazine Advertising and the World War II Home Front by John Bush Jones
2009 | PDF | ISBN: 9781584657682 | 173.1MB

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor and the entry of the United States into World War II, many commercial advertisers and their Madison Avenue ad agencies instantly switched from selling products and services to selling the home front on ways to support the war. Ads by major manufacturers showcased how their factories had turned to war production, demonstrating their participation in the war and helping people understand, for instance, that they couldn’t buy a new washing machine because the company was making munitions. Other ads helped civilians cope with wartime rationing and shortages by offering advice on how to make leftovers tasty, make shoes last, and keep a car in good working order. Ads also encouraged Victory Gardens, scrap collecting, giving blood, and (most important) buying War Bonds.

In this book, Jones examines hundreds of ads from ten large-circulation news and general-interest magazines of the period. He discusses motivational war ads, ads about industrial and agricultural support of the war, ads directed at uplifting the morale of civilians and GIs, and ads promoting home front efficiency, conservation, and volunteerism. Jones also includes ads praising women in war work and the armed forces and ads aimed at recruiting more women. Taken together, war ads in national magazines did their part to create the most efficient home front possible in order to support the war effort.

We're Going to Run This City: Winnipeg's Political Left after the General Strike [EPUB]

We're Going to Run This City: Winnipeg's Political Left after the General Strike [EPUB]
We're Going to Run This City: Winnipeg's Political Left after the General Strike by Stefan Epp-Koop
2015 | EPUB | ISBN: 9780887557842 | 2.26MB

Stefan Epp-Koop’s We’re Going to Run This City: Winnipeg’s Political Left After the General Strike explores the dynamic political movement that came out of the largest labor protest in Canadian history and the ramifications for Winnipeg throughout the 1920s and 1930s. Few have studied the political Left at the municipal level—even though it was at this grassroots level that many people participated in political activities and it was at this time the struggles between Left and Right were played out.

Winnipeg was divided between the political descendants of the General Strike's Citizen’s Committee of 1000, the conservative business elite who advocated for minimal government and low taxes, and parties on the political left. The Independent Labour Party and the Communist Party of Canada had numerous ties to the 1919 strikers and, although they were often in conflict with each other, both put forward platforms focused on the city’s working class.

The political strength of the Left would ebb and flow throughout the 1920s and 1930s but peaked in the mid-1930s when the ILP’s John Queen became mayor and the two parties on the Left combined to hold a majority of council seats. Astonishingly, Winnipeg was governed by a mayor who had served jail time for his role in the General Strike.

Forgotten Patriots: The Untold Story of American Prisoners During the Revolutionary War [EPUB]

Forgotten Patriots: The Untold Story of American Prisoners During the Revolutionary War [EPUB]
Forgotten Patriots: The Untold Story of American Prisoners During the Revolutionary War by Edwin G Burrows
2008 | EPUB | ISBN: 9780465008353 | 2.68MB

Between 1775 and 1783, some 200,000 Americans took up arms against the British Crown. Just over 6,800 of those men died in battle. About 25,000 became prisoners of war, most of them confined in New York City under conditions so atrocious that they perished by the thousands. Evidence suggests that at least 17,500 Americans may have died in these prisons—more than twice the number to die on the battlefield. It was in New York, not Boston or Philadelphia, where most Americans gave their lives for the cause of independence.

New York City became the jailhouse of the American Revolution because it was the principal base of the Crown's military operations. Beginning with the bumper crop of American captives taken during the 1776 invasion of New York, captured Americans were stuffed into a hastily assembled collection of public buildings, sugar houses, and prison ships. The prisoners were shockingly overcrowded and chronically underfed—those who escaped alive told of comrades so hungry they ate their own clothes and shoes.

Despite the extraordinary number of lives lost, Forgotten Patriots is the first-ever account of what took place in these hell-holes. The result is a unique perspective on the Revolutionary War as well as a sobering commentary on how Americans have remembered our struggle for independence—and how much we have forgotten.

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