Legacy: One Family, a Cup of Tea and the Company that Took On the World [EPUB]

Legacy: One Family, a Cup of Tea and the Company that Took On the World [EPUB]
Legacy: One Family, a Cup of Tea and the Company that Took On the World by Thomas Harding
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781785150883 | 48.36MB

A panoramic new history of modern Britain, as told through the story of one extraordinary family, and one groundbreaking company.

In the early 1800s Lehmann Gluckstein and his family escaped the pogroms of Eastern Europe and made their way to Whitechapel in the East End of London. There, starting with nothing, they worked tirelessly to pull themselves out of poverty, creating a small tobacco factory that quickly grew to become the largest catering company in the world: J. Lyons.

For over a century, Lyons was everywhere. Its restaurants and corner houses were on every high street, its coffee and tea in every cup, its products in every home. By bringing the world to the British people, the company transformed the way we eat, drink and are entertained – democratising luxury and globalising our tastes. But it was a victory that was not easily won – a story of the virtue of hard work, perseverance and an indomitable spirit in the face of repeated obstacles: poverty, hatred and injustice. It is a tale that is rarely told, of an immigrant family’s journey from rags to riches: the story of the British Dream.

Legacy charts the rise and fall of one of the most influential dynasties in British history through the lives of five astonishing generations, bound together by an unbreakable code. This is a sweeping yet intimate work of history, filled with stories of sacrifice and selflessness, betrayal and personal tragedy, Empire and its cost, and success on an unimaginable scale. It is also an illuminating new exploration of Britain and its place in the world, from the bestselling author of Hanns and Rudolf and The House by the Lake.

Winds of Change: Britain in the Early Sixties [EPUB]

Winds of Change: Britain in the Early Sixties [EPUB]
Winds of Change: Britain in the Early Sixties by Peter Hennessy
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781846141102 | 36.66MB

From the celebrated author of Never Again and Having It So Good, a wonderfully vivid new history of Britain in the early 1960s

Harold Macmillan famously said in 1960 that the wind of change was blowing over Africa and the remaining British Empire. But it was blowing over Britain too - its society; its relationship with Europe; its nuclear and defence policy. And where it was not blowing hard enough - the United Kingdom's economy - great efforts were made to sweep away the cobwebs of old industrial practices and poor labour relations. Life was lived in the knowledge that it could end in a single afternoon of thermonuclear exchange if the uneasy, armed peace of the Cold War tipped into a Third World War.

In Winds of Change we see Macmillan gradually working out his 'grand design' - how to be part of both a tight transatlantic alliance and Europe, dealing with his fellow geostrategists Kennedy and de Gaulle. The centre of the book is 1963 - the year of the Profumo Crisis, the Great Train Robbery, the satire boom, de Gaulle's veto of Britain's first application to join the EEC, the fall of Macmillan and the unexpected succession to the premiership of Alec Douglas-Home. Then, in 1964, the battle of what Hennessy calls the tweedy aristocrat and the tweedy meritocrat - Harold Wilson, who would end 13 years of Conservative rule and usher in a new era.

As in his acclaimed histories of British life in the two previous decades, Never Again and Having it so Good, Peter Hennessy explains the political, economic, cultural and social aspects of a nation with inimitable wit and empathy. No historian knows the by-ways as well the highways of the archives so well, and no one conveys the flavour of the period so engagingly. The early sixties live again in these pages.

The Unsettling of Europe: The Great Migration, 1945 to the Present [EPUB]

The Unsettling of Europe: The Great Migration, 1945 to the Present [EPUB]
The Unsettling of Europe: The Great Migration, 1945 to the Present by Peter Gatrell
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9780241290453 | 9.86MB

Migrants have stood at the heart of modern Europe's experience, whether trying to escape danger, to find a better life or as a result of deliberate policy, whether moving from the countryside to the city, or between countries, or from outside the continent altogether. Peter Gatrell's powerful new book is the first to bring these stories together into one place. He creates a compelling narrative bracketed by two nightmarish periods: the great convulsions following the fall of the Third Reich and the mass attempts in the 2010s by migrants to cross the Mediterranean into Europe.

The Unsettling of Europe is a new history of the continent, charting the ever-changing arguments about the desirability or otherwise of migrants and their central role in Europe's post-1945 prosperity. Gatrell is as fascinating on the giant movements of millions (such as the epic waves of German migration) to that of much smaller groups, such as the Karelians, Armenians, Moluccans or Ugandan Asians. Above all he has written a book that makes the reader deeply aware of the many extraordinary journeys taken by countless individuals in pursuit of work, safety and dignity, all the time.

This is a landmark book on a subject that, decade by decade, will always haunt Europe.

Blind Bombing: How Microwave Radar Brought the Allies to D-Day and Victory in World War II [EPUB]

Blind Bombing: How Microwave Radar Brought the Allies to D-Day and Victory in World War II [EPUB]
Blind Bombing: How Microwave Radar Brought the Allies to D-Day and Victory in World War II by Norman Fine
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781640122208 | 1.05MB

Late in 1939 Nazi Germany was poised to overrun Europe and extend Adolf Hitler’s fascist control. At the same time, however, two British physicists invented the resonant cavity magnetron. About the size of a hockey puck, it unlocked the enormous potential of radar exclusively for the Allies.

Since the discovery of radar early in the twentieth century, development across most of the world had progressed only incrementally. Germany and Japan had radar as well, but in just three years, the Allies’ new radar, incorporating the top-secret cavity magnetron, turned the tide of war from doubtful to a known conclusion before the enemy even figured out how. The tactical difference between the enemy’s primitive radar and the Allies’ new radar was similar to that between a musket and a rifle. The cavity magnetron proved to be the single most influential new invention contributing to winning the war in Europe.

Norman Fine tells the relatively unknown story of radar’s transformation from a technical curiosity to a previously unimaginable offensive weapon. We meet scientists and warriors critical to the story of radar and its pressure-filled development and implementation. Blind Bombing brings to light two characters who played an integral role in the story as it unfolded: one, a brilliant and opinionated scientist, the other, an easygoing twenty-one-year-old caught up in the peacetime draft.

This unlikely pair and a handful of their cohorts pioneered a revolution in warfare. They formulated new offensive tactics by trying, failing, and persevering, ultimately overcoming the naysayers and obstructionists on their own side and finally the enemy.

Escape from Rome: The Failure of Empire and the Road to Prosperity [EPUB]

Escape from Rome: The Failure of Empire and the Road to Prosperity [EPUB]
Escape from Rome: The Failure of Empire and the Road to Prosperity (The Princeton Economic History of the Western World) by Walter Scheidel
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9780691172187 | 20.82MB

The gripping story of how the end of the Roman Empire was the beginning of the modern world

The fall of the Roman Empire has long been considered one of the greatest disasters in history. But in this groundbreaking book, Walter Scheidel argues that Rome's dramatic collapse was actually the best thing that ever happened, clearing the path for Europe's economic rise and the creation of the modern age. Ranging across the entire premodern world, Escape from Rome offers new answers to some of the biggest questions in history: Why did the Roman Empire appear? Why did nothing like it ever return to Europe? And, above all, why did Europeans come to dominate the world?

In an absorbing narrative that begins with ancient Rome but stretches far beyond it, from Byzantium to China and from Genghis Khan to Napoleon, Scheidel shows how the demise of Rome and the enduring failure of empire-building on European soil ensured competitive fragmentation between and within states. This rich diversity encouraged political, economic, scientific, and technological breakthroughs that allowed Europe to surge ahead while other parts of the world lagged behind, burdened as they were by traditional empires and predatory regimes that lived by conquest. It wasn’t until Europe "escaped" from Rome that it launched an economic transformation that changed the continent and ultimately the world.

What has the Roman Empire ever done for us? Fall and go away.

American Illuminations: Urban Lighting, 1800–1920 [PDF]

American Illuminations: Urban Lighting, 1800–1920 [PDF]
American Illuminations: Urban Lighting, 1800–1920 by David E. Nye
2018 | PDF | ISBN: 9780262037419 | 53.5MB

How Americans adapted European royal illuminations for patriotic celebrations, spectacular expositions, and intensely bright commercial lighting to create the world's most dazzling and glamorous cities.

Illuminated fêtes and civic celebrations began in Renaissance Italy and spread through the courts of Europe. Their fireworks, torches, lamps, and special effects glorified the monarch, marked the birth of a prince, or celebrated military victory. Nineteenth-century Americans rejected such monarchial pomp and adapted spectacular lighting to their democratic, commercial culture. In American Illuminations, David Nye explains how they experimented with gas and electric light to create illuminated cityscapes far brighter and more dynamic than those of Europe, and how these illuminations became symbols of modernity and the conquest of nature.

Americans used gaslight and electricity in parades, expositions, advertising, elections, and political spectacles. In the 1880s, cities erected powerful arc lights on towers to create artificial moonlight. By the 1890s they adopted more intensive, commercial lighting that defined distinct zones of light and glamorized the city's White Ways, skyscrapers, bridges, department stores, theaters, and dance halls. Poor and blighted areas disappeared into the shadows. American illuminations also became integral parts of national political campaigns, presidential inaugurations, and victory celebrations after the Spanish-American War and World War I.

1919: The Year That Changed America [EPUB]

1919: The Year That Changed America [EPUB]
1919: The Year That Changed America by Martin W. Sandler
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781681198019 | 53.49MB

1919 was a world-shaking year. America was recovering from World War I and black soldiers returned to racism so violent that that summer would become known as the Red Summer. The suffrage movement had a long-fought win when women gained the right to vote. Laborers took to the streets to protest working conditions; nationalistic fervor led to a communism scare; and temperance gained such traction that prohibition went into effect. Each of these movements reached a tipping point that year.

Now, one hundred years later, these same social issues are more relevant than ever. Sandler traces the momentum and setbacks of these movements through this last century, showing that progress isn’t always a straight line and offering a unique lens through which we can understand history and the change many still seek.

The Apple of His Eye: Converts from Islam in the Reign of Louis IX [EPUB/PDF]

The Apple of His Eye: Converts from Islam in the Reign of Louis IX [EPUB/PDF]
The Apple of His Eye: Converts from Islam in the Reign of Louis IX (Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the Ancient to the Modern World) by William Chester Jordan
2019 | EPUB/PDF | ISBN: 9780691190112 | 3.93/7.1MB

The thirteenth century brought new urgency to Catholic efforts to convert non-Christians, and no Catholic ruler was more dedicated to this undertaking than King Louis IX of France. His military expeditions against Islam are well documented, but there was also a peaceful side to his encounter with the Muslim world, one that has received little attention until now. This splendid book shines new light on the king’s program to induce Muslims―the “apple of his eye”―to voluntarily convert to Christianity and resettle in France. It recovers a forgotten but important episode in the history of the Crusades while providing a rare window into the fraught experiences of the converts themselves.

William Chester Jordan transforms our understanding of medieval Christian-Muslim relations by telling the stories of the Muslims who came to France to live as Christians. Under what circumstances did they willingly convert? How successfully did they assimilate into French society? What forms of resistance did they employ? In examining questions like these, Jordan weaves a richly detailed portrait of a dazzling yet violent age whose lessons still resonate today.

Until now, scholars have dismissed historical accounts of the king’s peaceful conversion of Muslims as hagiographical and therefore untrustworthy. Jordan takes these narratives seriously―and uncovers archival evidence to back them up. He brings his findings marvelously to life in this succinct and compelling book, setting them in the context of the Seventh Crusade and the universalizing Catholic impulse to convert the world.

Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul [EPUB]

Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul [EPUB]
Ottoman Baroque: The Architectural Refashioning of Eighteenth-Century Istanbul by Unver Rustem
2019 | EPUB/PDF | ISBN: 9780691181875 | 203/467.05MB

A new approach to late Ottoman visual culture and its place in the world

With its idiosyncratic yet unmistakable adaptation of European Baroque models, the eighteenth-century architecture of Istanbul has frequently been dismissed by modern observers as inauthentic and derivative, a view reflecting broader unease with notions of Western influence on Islamic cultures. In Ottoman Baroque―the first English-language book on the topic―Ünver Rüstem provides a compelling reassessment of this building style and shows how between 1740 and 1800 the Ottomans consciously coopted European forms to craft a new, politically charged, and globally resonant image for their empire’s capital.

Rüstem reclaims the label “Ottoman Baroque” as a productive framework for exploring the connectedness of Istanbul’s eighteenth-century buildings to other traditions of the period. Using a wealth of primary sources, he demonstrates that this architecture was in its own day lauded by Ottomans and foreigners alike for its fresh, cosmopolitan effect. Purposefully and creatively assimilated, the style’s cross-cultural borrowings were combined with Byzantine references that asserted the Ottomans’ entitlement to the Classical artistic heritage of Europe. Such aesthetic rebranding was part of a larger endeavor to reaffirm the empire’s power at a time of intensified East-West contact, taking its boldest shape in a series of imperial mosques built across the city as landmarks of a state-sponsored idiom.

Copiously illustrated and drawing on previously unpublished documents, Ottoman Baroque breaks new ground in our understanding of Islamic visual culture in the modern era and offers a persuasive counterpoint to Eurocentric accounts of global art history.

Attlee and Churchill: Allies in War, Adversaries in Peace [EPUB]

Attlee and Churchill: Allies in War, Adversaries in Peace [EPUB]
Attlee and Churchill: Allies in War, Adversaries in Peace by Leo McKinstry
2019 | EPUB | ISBN: 9781848876606 | 6.46MB

Throughout history there have been many long-running rivalries between party leaders, but there has never been a connection like that between Churchill and Attlee. Brought together in the epoch-making circumstances of the Second World War, they forged a partnership that transcended party lines for five years.

If Churchill was the giant of the war, Attlee was the hero of the peace. In a sense the two men represented different sides of the best of the English character: Churchill, quivering with martial spirit, showed that spirit of courageous determination which had led to the triumphs of Agincourt and the creation of the largest empire the world had ever seen; Attlee, on the other hand, embodied that quintessentially English decency, stoicism, fair play and dislike of showiness.

In this ground-breaking book, Leo McKinstry provides a host of new insights into the two most compelling leaders of the mid-twentieth century, and creates a gripping narrative that tells anew the story of one of the most vibrant, traumatic and inspiring eras in modern British history.

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