With Their Bare Hands: General Pershing, the 79th Division, and the Battle for Montfaucon [EPUB]

With Their Bare Hands: General Pershing, the 79th Division, and the Battle for Montfaucon [EPUB]
With Their Bare Hands: General Pershing, the 79th Division, and the Battle for Montfaucon by Gene Fax
2017 | EPUB | 42.22MB

With Their Bare Hands traces the fate of the US 79th Division-men drafted off the streets of Baltimore, Washington, and Philadelphia-from their training camp in Maryland through the final years of World War I, focusing on their most famous engagement: the attack on Montfaucon, the most heavily fortified part of the German Line, during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in 1918.

Using the 79th as a window onto the American Army as a whole, Gene Fax examines its mistakes and triumphs, the tactics of the AEF commander-in-chief General John J. Pershing, and how the lessons it learned during the Great War helped it to fight World War II. Fax makes some startling judgments, on the role of future Army Chief-of-Staff, Colonel George C. Marshall; whether the Montfaucon battle-had it followed the plan-could have shortened the war; and if Pershing was justified in ordering his troops to attack right up to the moment of the Armistice.

Drawing upon original documents, including orders, field messages, and the letters and memoirs of the soldiers themselves, some of which have never been used before, Fax tells the engrossing story of the 79th Division's bloody involvement in the final months of World War I.

The Murderous History of Bible Translations: Power, Conflict, and the Quest for Meaning [EPUB]

The Murderous History of Bible Translations: Power, Conflict, and the Quest for Meaning [EPUB]
The Murderous History of Bible Translations: Power, Conflict, and the Quest for Meaning by Harry Freedman
2016 | EPUB | 2.13MB

Harry Freedman, author of The Talmud: A Biography, recounts the fascinating and bloody history of the Bible.

In 1535, William Tyndale, the first man to produce an English version of the Bible in print, was captured and imprisoned in Belgium. A year later he was strangled and then burned at the stake. His co-translator was also burned. In that same year the translator of the first Dutch Bible was arrested and beheaded. These were not the first, nor were they the last instances of extreme violence against Bible translators. The Murderous History of Bible Translations tells the remarkable, and bloody, story of those who dared translate the word of God.

The Bible has been translated far more than any other book. To our minds it is self-evident that believers can read their sacred literature in a language they understand. But the history of Bible translations is far more contentious than reason would suggest. Bible translations underlie an astonishing number of religious conflicts that have plagued the world.

Harry Freedman describes brilliantly the passions and strong emotions that arise when deeply held religious convictions are threatened or undermined. He tells of the struggle for authority and orthodoxy in a world where temporal power was always subjugated to the divine, a world in which the idea of a Bible for all was so important that many were willing to give up their time, security, and even their lives.

Strangers Arrive: Emigrés and the Arts in New Zealand, 1930–1980 [EPUB]

Strangers Arrive: Emigrés and the Arts in New Zealand, 1930–1980 [EPUB]
Strangers Arrive: Emigrés and the Arts in New Zealand, 1930–1980 by Leonard Bell
2017 | EPUB | 69.65MB

From the 1930s through the 1950s, a substantial number of forced migrants – refugees from Nazism, displaced people after World War II and escapees from Communist countries – arrived in New Zealand from Europe. Among them were an extraordinary group of artists and writers, photographers and architects whose European modernism radically reshaped the arts in this country. In words and pictures, Strangers Arrive tells their story.