The Missing JFK Assassination Film [EPUB]

The Missing JFK Assassination Film [EPUB]
The Missing JFK Assassination Film: The Mystery Surrounding the Orville Nix Home Movie of November 22, 1963 by Gayle Nix Jackson
2016 | EPUB | 2.85MB

Orville Nix is not the typical JFK assassination book. This book does not attempt to answer the question of who killed John F. Kennedy; instead, it addresses why we should question the actions of those involved and why the truth was withheld from the people. Though copies of Orville Nix’s film exist, the original film is missing. Why? The FBI confiscated Orville’s camera for several months, then returned it in pieces. Were these actions sinister or were they just examples of governmental incompetence? Orville Nix exposes information about the House Select Committee staff’s involvement in the missing film. Author Gayle Nix Jackson’s interviews with people who were close to Orville and the film will shed light on the government’s involvement with the filmmaker.

Gayle Nix Jackson is the granddaughter of Orville Nix. As his eldest granddaughter, Nix Jackson shares experiences growing up with her beloved grandfather and on how his views changed after that fatal day. Hearing his story precipitated the quest Jackson is still on to find the film. Her grandfather was there that day for a reason, and if the original Nix film could be located, modern-day technology could determine if there was indeed another person behind the stockade fence or not. Questions still abound today as to whether or not the film was altered. Finding the original Nix film would answer one of the most enduring questions related to this horrific event: Was there a conspiracy to kill John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963?

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race [EPUB]

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race [EPUB]
Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly
2016 | EPUB | 0.84MB

The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner.

Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.

Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.

Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.

The Cowshed: Memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution [EPUB]

The Cowshed: Memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution [EPUB]
The Cowshed: Memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution by Ji Xianlin, translated by Chenxin Jiang
2016 | EPUB | 1.83MB

The Chinese Cultural Revolution began in 1966 and led to a ten-year-long reign of Maoist terror throughout China, in which millions died or were sent to labor camps in the country or subjected to other forms of extreme discipline and humiliation. Ji Xianlin was one of them. The Cowshed is Ji’s harrowing account of his imprisonment in 1968 on the campus of Peking University and his subsequent disillusionment with the cult of Mao. As the campus spirals into a political frenzy, Ji, a professor of Eastern languages, is persecuted by lecturers and students from his own department. His home is raided, his most treasured possessions are destroyed, and Ji himself must endure hours of humiliation at brutal “struggle sessions.” He is forced to construct a cowshed (a makeshift prison for intellectuals who were labeled class enemies) in which he is then housed with other former colleagues. His eyewitness account of this excruciating experience is full of sharp irony, empathy, and remarkable insights into a central event in Chinese history.

In contemporary China, the Cultural Revolution remains a delicate topic, little discussed, but if a Chinese citizen has read one book on the subject, it is likely to be Ji’s memoir. When The Cowshed was published in China in 1998, it quickly became a bestseller. The Cultural Revolution had nearly disappeared from the collective memory. Prominent intellectuals rarely spoke openly about the revolution, and books on the subject were almost nonexistent. By the time of Ji’s death in 2009, little had changed, and despite its popularity, The Cowshed remains one of the only testimonies of its kind. As Zha Jianying writes in the introduction, “The book has sold well and stayed in print. But authorities also quietly took steps to restrict public discussion of the memoir, as its subject continues to be treated as sensitive. The present English edition, skillfully translated by Chenxin Jiang, is hence a welcome, valuable addition to the small body of work in this genre. It makes an important contribution to our understanding of that period.”