Revolutionary Yiddishland: A History of Jewish Radicalism [EPUB]

Revolutionary Yiddishland: A History of Jewish Radicalism [EPUB]
Revolutionary Yiddishland: A History of Jewish Radicalism by Alain Brossat, Sylvie Klingberg
2016 | EPUB | 0.5MB

Recovering the history of the revolutionary Jewish tradition

Jewish radicals manned the barricades on the avenues of Petrograd and the alleys of the Warsaw ghetto; they were in the vanguard of those resisting Franco and the Nazis. They originated in Yiddishland, a vast expanse of Eastern Europe that, before the Holocaust, ran from the Baltic Sea to the western edge of Russia and incorporated hundreds of Jewish communities with a combined population of some 11 million people. Within this territory, revolutionaries arose from the Jewish misery of Eastern and Central Europe; they were raised in the fear of God and taught to respect religious tradition, but were caught up in the great current of revolutionary utopian thinking. Socialists, Communists, Bundists, Zionists, Trotskyists, manual workers and intellectuals, they embodied the multifarious activity and radicalism of a Jewish working class that glimpsed the Messiah in the folds of the red flag.

Today, the world from which they came has disappeared, dismantled and destroyed by the Nazi genocide. After this irremediable break, there remain only survivors, and the work of memory for red Yiddishland. This book traces the struggles of these militants, their singular trajectories, their oscillation between great hope and doubt, their lost illusions—a red and Jewish gaze on the history of the twentieth century.

The Thieves of Threadneedle Street [EPUB]

The Thieves of Threadneedle Street [EPUB]
The Thieves of Threadneedle Street: The Incredible True Story of the American Forgers Who Nearly Broke the Bank of England by Nicholas Booth
2016 | EPUB | 3.11MB

The greatest untold crime saga of the Victorian Era: the extraordinary true story of four American forgers who tried to steal five million dollars from the Bank of England.

In the summer of 1873, four American forgers went on trial at the Old Bailey ― London’s iconic law court ― for the greatest fraud the world had ever seen. The attempted crime: stealing five million dollars from the Bank of England from under the noses of its unsuspecting officials. In The Thieves of Threadneedle Street, Nicholas Booth tells the extraordinary true story of the forgers' earliest escapades in Chicago, Louisville, and Manhattan, culminating with the heist at the world’s leading financial institution, the Bank of England. At the heart of the story is the charming criminal genius Austin Bidwell who, on the brink of escaping with his fortune, saw his luck finally run out.

They were apprehended after a manhunt across three continents. There were double crosses and miraculous escapes. There were chases across rural Ireland, through Scottish cities, across the Atlantic on ships heading toward Manhattan and ― most exotic of all ― Cuba, where the most elusive thief would eventually be captured, only to escape again. Hot on their trail was William Pinkerton, “the greatest detective in America,” scion of the famous detective agency.

With its cast of improbable villains, curious coincidences, and extraordinary adventures, it is an astounding international caper with twists and turns that often defy belief. It includes a colorful cast of supporting characters ― crooked policemen, corrupt officials, bribable warders, and love interests of varying hues of respectability: femme fatales, innocent lovers, hookers, and dupes. With access to previously unopened archives, Nicholas Booth has unearthed the greatest untold crime saga of the Victorian Era.

Operation Market Garden: The Legend of the Waal Crossing [EPUB]

Operation Market Garden: The Legend of the Waal Crossing [EPUB]
Operation Market Garden: The Legend of the Waal Crossing by Tim Lynch
2011 | EPUB | 9.26MB

A new interpretation of the wider military context of the doomed operation features previously unpublished photographs and documents

Using first hand accounts and official records, this history examines the legend of the Waal Crossing and the truth behind it, revealing how a culture of elitism mixed with national and personal rivalries led to arguably the greatest Allied defeat of the war. On September 20, 1944, U.S. paratroopers launched a desperate, near suicidal river-crossing in an effort to reach their airborne brethren trapped at Arnhem, only to see their efforts squandered by British tank crews who, instead of racing ahead, sat down to drink tea. The story of the Waal crossing—as told by American veterans of the operation—has become a part of the Arnhem legend, a legend of airborne heroism set against the timidity of the armored forces sent to relieve them; of American professionalism wasted by British incompetence. This history investigates what really happened, and why the operation was even necessary?